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Wed Feb 20 12:30:12 2019

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Call for testing: GRASS GIS with Python 3

Please help us testing the Python3 support in the yet unreleased GRASS GIS trunk (i.e., version “grass77” which will be released as “grass78” in the near future).

1. Why Python 3?

Python 2 is end-of-life (EOL); the current Python 2.7 will retire in 11 months from today (see https://pythonclock.org). We want to follow the “Moving to require Python 3” and complete the change to Python 3. And we need a broader community testing.

2. Download and test!

Packages are available at time:

3. Instructions for testing

4. Problems found? Please report them to us

Problems and bugs can be reported in the GRASS GIS trac. Code changes are welcome!

Thanks for testing grass77!

The post Call for testing: GRASS GIS with Python 3 appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS and OSGeo News.

Dealing with delayed measurements in (Geo)Pandas

Yesterday, I learned about a cool use case in data-driven agriculture that requires dealing with delayed measurements. As Bert mentions, for example, potatoes end up in the machines and are counted a few seconds after they’re actually taken out of the ground:

Therefore, in order to accurately map yield, we need to take this temporal offset into account.

We need to make sure that time and location stay untouched, but need to shift the potato count value. To support this use case, I’ve implemented apply_offset_seconds() for trajectories in movingpandas:

    def apply_offset_seconds(self, column, offset):
        self.df[column] = self.df[column].shift(offset, freq='1s')

The following test illustrates its use: you can see how the value column is shifted by 120 second. Geometry and time remain unchanged but the value column is shifted accordingly. In this test, we look at the row with index 2 which we access using iloc[2]:

    def test_offset_seconds(self):
        df = pd.DataFrame([
            {'geometry': Point(0, 0), 't': datetime(2018, 1, 1, 12, 0, 0), 'value': 1},
            {'geometry': Point(-6, 10), 't': datetime(2018, 1, 1, 12, 1, 0), 'value': 2},
            {'geometry': Point(6, 6), 't': datetime(2018, 1, 1, 12, 2, 0), 'value': 3},
            {'geometry': Point(6, 12), 't': datetime(2018, 1, 1, 12, 3, 0), 'value':4},
            {'geometry': Point(6, 18), 't': datetime(2018, 1, 1, 12, 4, 0), 'value':5}
        ]).set_index('t')
        geo_df = GeoDataFrame(df, crs={'init': '31256'})
        traj = Trajectory(1, geo_df)
        traj.apply_offset_seconds('value', -120)
        self.assertEqual(traj.df.iloc[2].value, 5)
        self.assertEqual(traj.df.iloc[2].geometry, Point(6, 6))

Movement data in GIS #19: splitting trajectories by date

Many current movement data sources provide more or less continuous streams of object locations. For example, the AIS system provides continuous locations of vessels (mostly ships). This continuous stream of locations – let’s call it track – starts when we first record the vessel and ends with the last record. This start and end does not necessarily coincide with the start or end of a vessel voyage from one port to another. The stream start and end do not have any particular meaning. Instead, if we want to see what’s going on, we need to split the track into meaningful segments. One such segmentation – albeit a simple one – is to split tracks by day. This segmentation assumes that day/night changes affect the movement of our observed object. For many types of objects – those who mostly stay still during the night – this will work reasonably well.

For example, the following screenshot shows raw data of one particular vessel in the Boston region. By default, QGIS provides a Points to Path to convert points to lines. This tool takes one “group by” and one “order by” field. Therefore, if we want one trajectory per ship per day, we’d first have to create a new field that combines ship ID and day so that we can use this combination as a “group by” field. Additionally, the resulting lines loose all temporal information.

To simplify this workflow, Trajectools now provides a new algorithm that creates day trajectories and outputs LinestringM features. Using the Day trajectories from point layer tool, we can immediately see that our vessel of interest has been active for three consecutive days: entering our observation area on Nov 5th, moving to Boston where it stayed over night, then moving south to Weymouth on the next day, and leaving on the 7th.

Since the resulting trajectories are LinestringM features with time information stored in the M value, we can also visualize the speed of movement (as discussed in part #2 of this series):

Two Weeks of Leaflet - Day 1

Background We at Locate Press have been working on a new book: Leaflet Cookbook, by Numa Gremling. The book is chock-full of over 300 pages of recipes and information to get the most of your web maps. The book is content complete and available as a preview. I’ve dabbled in Leaflet in the past, but only scratched the surface. So, I’ve decided to spend two weeks starting from the ground up and create a decent web map.

Two Weeks of Leaflet - Day 1

Background We at Locate Press have been working on a new book: Leaflet Cookbook, by Numa Gremling. The book is chock-full of over 300 pages of recipes and information to get the most of your web maps. The book is content complete and available as a preview. I’ve dabbled in Leaflet in the past, but only scratched the surface. So, I’ve decided to spend two weeks starting from the ground up and create a decent web map.

From CSV to GeoDataFrame in two lines

Pandas is great for data munging and with the help of GeoPandas, these capabilities expand into the spatial realm.

With just two lines, it’s quick and easy to transform a plain headerless CSV file into a GeoDataFrame. (If your CSV is nice and already contains a header, you can skip the header=None and names=FILE_HEADER parameters.)

usecols=USE_COLS is also optional and allows us to specify that we only want to use a subset of the columns available in the CSV.

After the obligatory imports and setting of variables, all we need to do is read the CSV into a regular DataFrame and then construct a GeoDataFrame.

import pandas as pd
from geopandas import GeoDataFrame
from shapely.geometry import Point

FILE_NAME = "/temp/your.csv"
FILE_HEADER = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'x', 'y']
USE_COLS = ['a', 'x', 'y']

df = pd.read_csv(
    FILE_NAME, delimiter=";", header=None,
    names=FILE_HEADER, usecols=USE_COLS)
gdf = GeoDataFrame(
    df.drop(['x', 'y'], axis=1),
    crs={'init': 'epsg:4326'},
    geometry=[Point(xy) for xy in zip(df.x, df.y)])

It’s also possible to create the point objects using a lambda function as shown by weiji14 on GIS.SE.

GRASS GIS 7.6.0 released

We are pleased to announce the GRASS GIS 7.6.0 release

What’s new in a nutshell

After almost 1 year of development the new stable release GRASS GIS 7.6.0 is available. Efforts have concentrated on making the user experience even better, providing many new useful additional functionalities to modules and further improving the graphical user interface. Furthermore, ZSTD has been added a new raster compression method which is an improvement over ZLIB’s deflate method, providing both faster and higher compression than ZLIB. Also a new raster map type has been added: GRASS virtual raster (VRT) which is a virtual mosaic of the list of input raster maps. In addition, support for PROJ v. 5 has been implemented. An overview of the new features in the 7.6 release series is available at new features in GRASS GIS 7.6.

Binaries/Installer download:

Source code download:

More details:

See also our detailed announcement:

First time users may explore the first steps tutorial after installation.

About GRASS GIS

The Geographic Resources Analysis Support System (https://grass.osgeo.org/), commonly referred to as GRASS GIS, is an Open Source Geographic Information System providing powerful raster, vector and geospatial processing capabilities in a single integrated software suite. GRASS GIS includes tools for spatial modeling, visualization of raster and vector data, management and analysis of geospatial data, and the processing of satellite and aerial imagery. It also provides the capability to produce sophisticated presentation graphics and hardcopy maps. GRASS GIS has been translated into about twenty languages and supports a huge array of data formats. It can be used either as a stand-alone application or as backend for other software packages such as QGIS and R geostatistics. It is distributed freely under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL). GRASS GIS is a founding member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo).

The GRASS Development Team, January 2019

The post GRASS GIS 7.6.0 released appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS and OSGeo News.

WCS QGIS and PDOK

Rant? This WCS investigation started off because my PDOKServicesPlugin was not working for the PDOK WCS services anymore. I wanted to see all fired network requests, so am creating a future plugin for that: https://github.com/rduivenvoorde/qgisnetworklogger. But I hit all kind of issues when trying out the service(s). This is some write up of my findings … Continue reading WCS QGIS and PDOK

On custom layout checks in QGIS 3.6, and how they can do your work for you!

Recently, we had the opportunity to implement an exciting new feature within QGIS. An enterprise with a large number of QGIS installs was looking for a way to control the outputs which staff were creating from the software, and enforce a set of predefined policies. The policies were designed to ensure that maps created in QGIS’ print layout designer would meet a set of minimum standards, e.g.:

  • Layouts must include a “Copyright 2019 by XXX” label somewhere on the page
  • All maps must have a linked scale bar
  • No layers from certain blacklisted sources (e.g. Google Maps tiles) are permitted
  • Required attribution text for other layers must be included somewhere on the layout

Instead of just making a set of written policies and hoping that staff correctly follow them, it was instead decided that the checks should be performed automatically by QGIS itself. If any of the checks failed (indicating that the map wasn’t complying to the policies), the layout export would be blocked and the user would be advised what they needed to change in their map to make it compliant.

The result of this work is a brand new API for implementing custom “validity checks” within QGIS. Out of the box, QGIS 3.6 ships with two in-built validity checks. These are:

  • A check to warn users when a layout includes a scale bar which isn’t linked to a map
  • A check to warn users if a map overview in a layout isn’t linked to a map (e.g. if the linked map has been deleted)

All QGIS 3.6 users will see a friendly warning if either of these conditions are met, advising them of the potential issue.

 

The exciting stuff comes in custom, in-house checks. These are written in PyQGIS, so they can be deployed through in-house plugins or startup scripts. Let’s explore some examples to see how these work.

A basic check looks something like this:

from qgis.core import check

@check.register(type=QgsAbstractValidityCheck.TypeLayoutCheck)
def my_layout_check(context, feedback):
  results = ...
  return results

Checks are created using the @check.register decorator. This takes a single argument, the check type. For now, only layout checks are implemented, so this should be set to QgsAbstractValidityCheck.TypeLayoutCheck. The check function is given two arguments, a QgsValidityCheckContext argument, and a feedback argument. We can safely ignore the feedback option for now, but the context argument is important. This context contains information useful for the check to run — in the case of layout checks, the context contains a reference to the layout being checked. The check function should return a list of QgsValidityCheckResult objects, or an empty list if the check was passed successfully with no warnings or errors.

Here’s a more complete example. This one throws a warning whenever a layout map item is set to the web mercator (EPSG:3875) projection:

@check.register(type=QgsAbstractValidityCheck.TypeLayoutCheck)
def layout_map_crs_choice_check(context, feedback):
  layout = context.layout
  results = []
  for i in layout.items():
    if isinstance(i, QgsLayoutItemMap) and i.crs().authid() == 'EPSG:3857':
      res = QgsValidityCheckResult()
      res.type = QgsValidityCheckResult.Warning
      res.title='Map projection is misleading'
      res.detailedDescription='The projection for the map item {} is set to Web Mercator (EPSG:3857) which misrepresents areas and shapes. Consider using an appropriate local projection instead.'.format(i.displayName())
      results.append(res)

  return results

Here, our check loops through all the items in the layout being tested, looking for QgsLayoutItemMap instances. It then checks the CRS for each map, and if that CRS is ‘EPSG:3857’, a warning result is returned. The warning includes a friendly message for users advising them why the check failed.

In this example our check is returning results with a QgsValidityCheckResult.Warning type. Warning results are shown to users, but they don’t prevent users from proceeding and continuing to export their layout.

Checks can also return “critical” results. If any critical results are obtained, then the actual export itself is blocked. The user is still shown the messages generated by the check so that they know how to resolve the issue, but they can’t proceed with the export until they’ve fixed their layout. Here’s an example of a check which returns critical results, preventing layout export if there’s no “Copyright 2019 North Road” labels included on their layout:

@check.register(type=QgsAbstractValidityCheck.TypeLayoutCheck)
def layout_map_crs_choice_check(context, feedback):
  layout = context.layout
  for i in layout.items():
    if isinstance(i, QgsLayoutItemLabel) and 'Copyright 2019 North Road' in i.currentText():
      return

  # did not find copyright text, block layout export
  res = QgsValidityCheckResult()
  res.type = QgsValidityCheckResult.Critical
  res.title = 'Missing copyright label'
  res.detailedDescription = 'Layout has no "Copyright" label. Please add a label containing the text "Copyright 2019 North Road".'
  return [res]

If we try to export a layout with the copyright notice, we now get this error:

Notice how the OK button is disabled, and users are forced to fix the error before they can export their layouts.

Here’s a final example. This one runs through all the layers included within maps in the layout, and if any of them come from a “blacklisted” source, the user is not permitted to proceed with the export:

@check.register(type=QgsAbstractValidityCheck.TypeLayoutCheck)
def layout_map_crs_choice_check(context, feedback):
  layout = context.layout
  for i in layout.items():
    if isinstance(i, QgsLayoutItemMap):
      for l in i.layersToRender():
        # check if layer source is blacklisted
        if 'mt1.google.com' in l.source():
          res = QgsValidityCheckResult()
          res.type = QgsValidityCheckResult.Critical
          res.title = 'Blacklisted layer source'
          res.detailedDescription = 'This layout includes a Google maps layer ("{}"), which is in violation of their Terms of Service.'.format(l.name())
          return [res]

Of course, all checks are run each time — so if a layout fails multiple checks, the user will see a summary of ALL failed checks, and can click on each in turn to see the detailed description of the failure.

So there we go — when QGIS 3.6 is released in late February 2019, you’ll  have access to this API and can start making QGIS automatically enforce your organisation policies for you! The really neat thing is that this doesn’t only apply to large organisations. Even if you’re a one-person shop using QGIS, you could write your own checks to  make QGIS “remind” you when you’ve forgotten to include something in your products. It’d even be possible to hook into one of the available Python spell checking libraries to write a spelling check! With any luck, this should lead to better quality outputs and less back and forth with your clients.

North Road are leading experts in customising the QGIS application for enterprise installs. If you’d like to discuss how you can deploy in-house customisation like this within your organisation, contact us for further details!

GRASS GIS 7.4.4 released: QGIS friendship release

We are pleased to announce the GRASS GIS 7.4.4 release

What’s new in a nutshell

The new update release GRASS GIS 7.4.4 is release with a few bugfixes and the addition of r.mapcalc.simple esp. for QGIS integration. An overview of the new features in the 7.4 release series is available at New Features in GRASS GIS 7.4.

As a stable release series, 7.4.x enjoys long-term support.

Binaries/Installer download:

Source code download:

More details:

See also our detailed announcement:

About GRASS GIS

The Geographic Resources Analysis Support System (https://grass.osgeo.org/), commonly referred to as GRASS GIS, is an Open Source Geographic Information System providing powerful raster, vector and geospatial processing capabilities in a single integrated software suite. GRASS GIS includes tools for spatial modeling, visualization of raster and vector data, management and analysis of geospatial data, and the processing of satellite and aerial imagery. It also provides the capability to produce sophisticated presentation graphics and hardcopy maps. GRASS GIS has been translated into about twenty languages and supports a huge array of data formats. It can be used either as a stand-alone application or as backend for other software packages such as QGIS and R geostatistics. It is distributed freely under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL). GRASS GIS is a founding member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo).

The GRASS Development Team, January 2019

The post GRASS GIS 7.4.4 released: QGIS friendship release appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS and OSGeo News.

New Year’s present – QField 1.0 RC1

It was a long and winding road but we are very excited to announce the general availability of QField 1.0 Release Candidate 1.

Packed with loads of useful features like online and offline features digitizing, geometry and attributes editing, attribute search, powerful forms, theme switching, GPS support, camera integration and much more, QField is the powerful tool for those who need to edit on the go and would like to avoid standing in the swamp with a laptop or paper charts.

With a slick user interface, QField allows using QGIS projects on tablets and mobile devices. Thanks to the QGIS rendering engine, the map-results are identical and come with the full range of styling possibilities available on the desktop.

We ask you to help us test as much as possible this Release Candidate so that we can iron out as many bugs as possible before the final release of QField 1.0.

You can easily install QField using the playstore (http://qfield.org/get), find out more on the documentation site (http://qfield.org) and report problems to our issues tracking system (http://qfield.org/issues)

QField, like QGIS, is an open source project. Everyone is welcome to contribute to make the product even better – whether it is with financial support, enthusiastic programming, translation and documentation work or visionary ideas.

If you want to help us build a better QField or QGIS, or need any services related to the whole QGIS stack don’t hesitate to contact us.

User question of the Month – Jan19 & answers from Dec

In December, we wanted to know what QGIS.ORG should focus on in 2019.

Portuguese 

selection_002

Based on these results, in today’s PSC meeting, we’ve decided that the 2019 grant programme will be focusing on bug fixing and polishing existing features. So thanks to everyone who provided feedback!

New question

This month, we’d like to know if you have ever contributed to improving QGIS and – if yes – how. As you’ll see, there are many different ways to contribute to QGIS, so please go ahead and take the survey.

The survey is available in English, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Italian, Ukrainian, and Danish. If you want to help us translate user questions in more languages, please get in touch!

PyQGIS101 part 10 published!

PyQGIS 101: Introduction to QGIS Python programming for non-programmers has now reached the part 10 milestone!

Beyond the obligatory Hello world! example, the contents so far include:

If you’ve been thinking about learning Python programming, but never got around to actually start doing it, give PyQGIS101 a try.

I’d like to thank everyone who has already provided feedback to the exercises. Every comment is important to help me understand the pain points of learning Python for QGIS.

I recently read an article – unfortunately I forgot to bookmark it and cannot locate it anymore – that described the problems with learning to program very well: in the beginning, it’s rather slow going, you don’t know the right terminology and therefore don’t know what to google for when you run into issues. But there comes this point, when you finally get it, when the terminology becomes clearer, when you start thinking “that might work” and it actually does! I hope that PyQGIS101 will be a help along the way.

QGIS and Call Before You Dig

Just released a new version of the KLIC viewer plugin for QGIS. This was neccesary because the format of the information received has changed a lot! Before it only included the information on pipelines in raster format. Now the information on pipelines delivered in XML can include information in vector format . The KLIC viewer … Continue reading QGIS and Call Before You Dig

Plugin Builder 3.1

We’ve released version 3.1 of the Plugin Builder for QGIS 3.x. This version contains a number of bug fixes and performance enhancements. Here are some of the changes included since version 3.0.3: Fix issue with reload on generated plugins Move dialog creation to run method to improve startup performance Move help file generation files to proper method Include missing tags file Attempt to compile resources.qrc when plugin is generated (requires pyrcc5 in path) Set deployment directory in Makefile based on user OS (pb_tool is recommended over make) Check for valid URL format for tracker and repository Compiling Resource File If you have the resource compiler pyrcc5 in your path, the resource file will be compiled automatically when you generate your new plugin.

QGIS Back in the Day

Do you remember this? If so, you’ve been using QGIS a long time… OGR and PostGIS support No raster support Three widgets on the Symbology tab No symbology in the legend But you could use it handily on a 640x480 display.

Plugin Builder 2.8.1

This minor update to the Plugin Builder allows you to choose where your plugin menu will be located. Previously your menu was placed under the Plugins menu. At version 2.8.1 you can choose from the following main menu locations: Plugins Database Raster Vector Web Plugins is the default choice when you open Plugin Builder. The value you choose is also written to the category field in your metadata.txt file.

QGIS Gains a Gold Sponsor

The Quantum GIS (QGIS) project is happy to announce that the Asia Air Survey Co., Ltd (AAS), a Japanese international consulting company, has become a Gold Sponsor. AAS has committed to providing 9,000 EUR (~$11,000 US) each of three years, beginning in November 2012. The AAS sponsorship is yet another indication that QGIS is a mature and stable project which continues to provide innovative open source GIS software. The QGIS Project Steering Committee (PSC) wishes to thank AAS for their continuing commitment.

Quick Guide to Getting Started with PyQGIS 3 on Windows

Getting started with Python and QGIS 3 can be a bit overwhelming. In this post we give you a quick start to get you up and running and maybe make your PyQGIS life a little easier. There are likely many ways to setup a working PyQGIS development environment—this one works pretty well. Contents Requirements Installing OSGeo4W Setting the Environment pb_tool Working on the Command Line IDE Example Workflow Creating a New Plugin Working with Existing Plugin Code Troubleshooting

QGIS Plugin of the Week: qNote

This week we look at a newly arrived plugin named qNote. This plugin allows you to create a note and store it in a QGIS project file. When the project is loaded, the note is restored and can be viewed in the qNote panel. This little plugin provides a way to attach metadata to a project. Things you might want to include in a note are: Content of the project Purpose Area of interest Where the data came from Who created the project This information can be helpful when sharing a project or when you forget what you did six months after the fact.

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