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QGIS Planet

How to use Print Composer templates

In the previous post, Mickael shared a great map design. The download includes a print composer template, that you can use to recreate the design in a few simple steps:

1. Create a new composition based on a template

Open the Composer manager and configure it to use a specific template. Then you can select the .qpt template file and press the Add button to create a new composition based on the template.

2. Update image item paths

If the template uses images, the paths to the images most likely need to be fixed since the .qpt file stores absolute file paths instead of relative ones.

update_image_paths

With these steps, you’re now ready to use the design for your own maps. Happy QGISing!


Material design map tutorial for QGIS Composer

This is a guest post by Mickael HOARAU @Oneil974

For those wishing to get a stylized map on QGIS composer, I’ve been working on a tutorial to share with you a project I’m working on. Fan of web design and GIS user since few years, I wanted to merge Material Design Style with Map composer. Here is a tutorial to show you how to make simply a Material Design Map style on QGIS.

Click to view slideshow.

You can download tutorial here:

Tutorial Material Design Map

And sources here:

Sources Material Design Map

An Atlas Powered version is coming soon!


The EuroLST seamless and gap-free daily European maps of land surface temperatures

The EuroLST dataset is seamless and gap-free with a temporal resolution of four records per day and enhanced spatial resolution of 250 m. This newly developed reconstruction method (Metz et al, 2014) has been applied to Europe and neighbouring countries, resulting in complete daily coverage from 2001 onwards. To our knowledge, this new reconstructed LST time series exceeds the level of detail of comparable reconstructed LST datasets by several orders of magnitude. Studies on emerging diseases, parasite risk assessment and temperature anomalies can now be performed on the continental scale, maintaining high spatial and temporal detail. In their paper, the authors provide examples for implications and applications of the new LST dataset, such as disease risk assessment, epidemiology, environmental monitoring, and temperature anomalies.

Reconstructed MODIS Land Surface Temperature Dataset, at 250m pixel resolution (click figure to enlarge):
MODIS lst time series reconstructed

Section 1. Article and data citation:

EuroLST has been produced by the former PGIS group at Fondazione Edmund Mach, DBEM based on daily MODIS LST (Product of NASA) maps.

Metz, M.; Rocchini, D.; Neteler, M. 2014: Surface temperatures at the continental scale: Tracking changes with remote sensing at unprecedented detail. Remote Sensing. 2014, 6(5): 3822-3840 (DOI | HTML | PDF)

Section 2. Used software

Open Source commands used in processing (GRASS GIS 7):
links to the related manual pages involved in the data preparation

  • i.pca: Principal Components Analysis (PCA) for image processing.
  • r.regression.multi: it calculates multiple linear regression from raster maps
  • v.surf.bspline: it performs bicubic or bilinear spline interpolation with Tykhonov regularization.

Furthermore:

  • r.bioclim: calculates various bioclimatic indices from monthly temperature and optional precipitation time series (install in GRASS GIS 7 with “g.extention r.bioclim”)
  • pyModis: Free and Open Source Python based library to work with MODIS data

Section 3. Metadata

Map projection: EPSG 3035, prj file
PROJCS["Lambert Azimuthal Equal Area",
    GEOGCS["grs80",
        DATUM["European_Terrestrial_Reference_System_1989",
            SPHEROID["Geodetic_Reference_System_1980",6378137,298.257222101]],
        PRIMEM["Greenwich",0],
        UNIT["degree",0.0174532925199433]],
    PROJECTION["Lambert_Azimuthal_Equal_Area"],
    PARAMETER["latitude_of_center",52],
    PARAMETER["longitude_of_center",10],
    PARAMETER["false_easting",4321000],
    PARAMETER["false_northing",3210000],
    UNIT["Meter",1]]

1. Selected open data derived from EuroLST

Section 1. BIOCLIM derived from reconstructed MODIS LST at 250m pixel resolution

BIO1: Annual mean temperature (°C*10) BIO2: Mean diurnal range (Mean monthly (max - min tem)) BIO3: Isothermality ((bio2/bio7)*100) BIO4: Temperature seasonality (standard deviation * 100) BIO5: Maximum temperature of the warmest month (°C*10) BIO6: Minimum temperature of the coldest month (°C*10) BIO7: Temperature annual range (bio5 - bio6) (°C*10) BIO10: Mean temperature of the warmest quarter (°C*10) BIO11: Mean temperature of the coldest quarter (°C*10)

BIOCLIM-like European LST maps following the “Bioclim” definition (Hutchinson et al., 2009) – derived from 10 years of reconstructed MODIS LST (download to be completed) as GeoTIFF files, 250m pixel resolution, in EU LAEA projection:

Each ZIP file contains the respective GeoTIFF file (for cell value units, see below), the color table as separate ASCII file and a README.txt with details.

Section 2. WMS/WCS Server

Using this URL, you can read the EuroLST BIOCLIM data directly via OGC WMS and WCS protocol:

http://geodati.fmach.it/production/ows_europe_lst

Section 3. OpenData License

The data published in this page are open data and released under the ODbL (Open Database License).

The full EuroLST dataset is not released online as open data (size: 18TB), please ask Luca Delucchi or Roberto Zorer for more info


2. Acknowledgments

The MOD11A1.005, MYD11A1.005 were retrieved from the online web site, courtesy of the NASA EOSDIS Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC), USGS/Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, http://e4ftl01.cr.usgs.gov/

The post The EuroLST seamless and gap-free daily European maps of land surface temperatures appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

Updating PyQt signals that use lambda in QGIS with 2to3

Just for the sake of documenting things, when running qgis 2to3 on a plugin I encountered a tricky situation regarding signals. [crayon-5875c6932af60703569495/] The original code: [crayon-5875c6932af6e568651885/] The generated code: [crayon-5875c6932af76250321562/] so in do_load_project we get False instead of “my test

Using threads in QGIS python plugins

Here an example on how to work with threads in a consistent and clean manner in QGIS python plugins

Point cluster renderer crowdfunding – successful!

Great news! Thanks in part to some generous last minute pledges, our QGIS Point Cluster Renderer campaign has successfully reached its target. This means that QGIS 3.0 will now include a full feature and flexible cluster renderer.

In the meantime, we’d like to extend our warmest thanks to the following generous contributors, whose pledges have made this work possible:

  • Andreas Neumann
  • Qtibia Engineering (Tudor Barascu)
  • Karl-Magnus Jönsson
  • Geonesia (Nicolas Ponzo)

Plus numerous additional anonymous backers whose generous contributions are also highly valued. If you run into any of these funders at a QGIS user group or conference, make sure you treat them like the GIS rock-stars they are!

Keep an eye out on our social media accounts as we’ll be posting more video demonstrations of this work as it lands in the QGIS codebase.

BOTH

Editing Raster Cell Values in QGIS Using Serval Plugin

Users can directly edit raster cell values using Serval plugin in QGIS.

Read more for how to use this plugin…

How to use Serval

Serval is available from QGIS plugin repository. Note that you will need to restart QGIS if you upgrade Serval from an earlier version.

Once installed, Serval functions and settings will be available from the toolbar.

Serval Toolbar in QGIS

Serval supports Undo/Redo for editing values of raster. But it is recommended to make a copy of your raster.

Currently, the following functionalities are available:

  • Probe mode Displays raster bands values in boxes.
  • Draw mode Draw/Edit mode: bands values can be modified in the boxes and written to the current raster cell by hitting the Enter key. In this mode the values will be also assigned to any other raster cell clicked by user.
  • Write nodata To replace a cell value with the NODATA value.
  • Define nodata To define or replace the NODATA value.
  • Color picker To pick a color using QGIS color picker (3-bands rasters only).
  • Undo Redo To Undo/Redo the cell edit. Edits history is saved separately for each raster, that is, undo/redo is always done for current raster layer.

Future developments

We’d like to add support to edit values using spatial and expression selection tools.

For any problems or feedback, please consider to file a ticket here.

Reporting back from Bonn & Oslo

Over the last two weeks, I had the pleasure to attend both the international FOSS4G conference in Bonn, Germany, as well as the regional FOSS4G-NOR in Oslo, Norway. Both events were superbly organized and provided tons of possibilities to share experiences and find new inspiration.

Talks at both conferences have been recorded and can be watched online: Bonn / Oslo

I enjoyed having the opportunity to give two very different talks. In Bonn, I presented work on pedestrian routing and navigation, which was developed within the PERRON project:

It was particularly nice that we had plenty of time for Q&A after this presentation since only two talks were scheduled for this session rather than the usual three. I’d also like to thank everyone for the great feedback – both in person and on Twitter!

In Oslo, I had the honor to give the opening keynote on OpenSource in general and the QGIS project in particular:

2 – Anita Graser – QGIS – A Community-powered GIS Project from krokskogstrollet on Vimeo.

Both conferences were packed with great sessions and talks. If I had to pick favorites from last week’s presentations, I would have to opt for Iván Sánchez presenting his latest projects, including what3fucks and geohaiku:

6 – Iván Sánchez Ortega, Mazemap – Addressing NSFW Geodesic Grids from krokskogstrollet on Vimeo.

Followed closely by the impressive project presentations of the student organizers of FOSS4G-NOR:

10 – Program Committee – What are the results when students use Open Source? from krokskogstrollet on Vimeo.

All three projects: OPPTUR, GISTYLE, and the flexible traffic web viewer were great demos of what can be achieved with open source tools. Mathilde’s GISTYLE project is also available on Github.

An inspiring GISummer comes to an end, but with so many videos to watch and workshop materials to explore, I’m convinced that the autumn will be no less exciting.


GRASS GIS PSC election 2016 results

The new GRASS GIS Project Steering Committee (PSC) is composed of the following nine members (ranking, name, votes):

1 Markus Neteler 62
2 Helena Mitasova 53
3 Martin Landa 52
4 Anna Petrasova 45
5 Moritz Lennert 41
6 Margherita Di Leo 39
7 Michael Barton 35
8 Peter Löwe 33
9 Vaclav Petras 31

More details in earlier announcement sent to the “grass-psc” mailing list:
https://lists.osgeo.org/pipermail/grass-psc/2016-August/001571.html.

For completeness, all relevant candidacy communications, as well as details about the voting process, are published at
https://trac.osgeo.org/grass/wiki/PSC/Election2016

Cited from the original announcement email:
https://lists.osgeo.org/pipermail/grass-announce/2016-September/000119.html

The post GRASS GIS PSC election 2016 results appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

Point cluster renderer crowdfunding – the final countdown!

At North Road we are currently running a crowdfunding campaign to sponsor work on a new “Point Cluster Renderer” for QGIS. This is a really exciting new feature which would help make possible some neat styling effects which just aren’t possible in QGIS at the moment. The campaign is now in its final hours and we’ve still got some way to go to reach the campaign goals. If you’re interested in seeing this feature happen, now’s the time to jump onboard and contribute to the campaign!

Before time runs out we’d like to share some more details on how the cluster renderer can be enhanced through the use of data defined symbol overrides. Data defined overrides are where a huge part of QGIS’ symbology power resides. If you’re not familiar with them, we’d suggest grabbing a copy of Anita Graser and Gretchen Peterson’s reference “QGIS Map Design” (seriously – buy this book. You won’t regret it!). Basically, data defined properties allow you to set rules in place which control exactly how each individual feature in a layer is rendered. So, for instance, you can create an override which makes just a single feature render in a different color, or with a larger label, or so that all features with a value over 100 render with a bold label.

We’ve designed the point cluster renderer to take full advantage of QGIS data defined symbology. What this means is that the cluster symbol (ie, the marker which is rendered when 2 or more points are sufficiently close together) will respect any data defined overrides you set for this symbol, and each individual cluster symbol can have a different appearance as a result.

To make this even more flexible, the clusterer will also provide two additional new variables which can be used in data defined overrides for the symbol. The first of these, @cluster_size, will be preset to equal the number of features which have been clustered together at that point. Eg, if the cluster consists of 4 individual neighbouring features, then @cluster_size will be 4 when the cluster symbol is rendered. This can be used to alter the appearance of the cluster symbol based on the number of associated points. The mockup below shows how this could be used to scale the cluster symbol size so that clusters with more points are rendered larger than clusters with less points:

symbol_sizeIn this mockup we’ve also used a font marker symbol layer to render the actual cluster size inside the symbol too. Of course, because almost every property of symbols in QGIS can be data defined there’s almost no limit how @cluster_size could be used – you could use it to change the symbol color by pairing it with QGIS’ ramp_color function, or alter the symbol opacity, or the outline width… basically anything!

The second new expression variable which would be introduced with the cluster renderer is @cluster_color. This variable allows you to access the color of the points contained within each cluster. Since the cluster renderer is built “on top” of an existing renderer, any point which is NOT contained within a cluster is rendered using the specified renderer. For example, if you use a categorized symbol renderer then all points which aren’t in clusters will be drawn using these categorized classes. In this case isolated points will be drawn using different colors to match the predefined classes.

When multiple points are clustered together, @cluster_color will be set to match the color of any contained points. The points must all have the same color, if they differ then @cluster_color will be null. It’s easiest to illustrate this concept! In the below mockup, we’ve used a categorized render to shade points by an attribute (in this case rail line segment name), and used an uninspiring dark grey circle for the cluster markers:

clusters_categorized

Using @cluster_color together with a data defined color override, we can force these cluster markers to retain the colors from the points within each cluster:

clusters_categorized2

Much nicer! You’ll note that a single dark grey point remains, which is where the cluster consists of stations from multiple different line segments. In this case @cluster_color is null, so the data defined override is not applied and the marker falls back to the dark grey color.

Of course, both @cluster_size and @cluster_color can be combined to create some very nice results:

BOTH

So there we have it – using data defined overrides with the cluster marker renderer allows for extremely flexible, powerful cartography!

Now’s the time to get involved… if you’re wanting to see this feature in QGIS, head over to the crowd funding page to find out how YOU can contribute!

 

OSGeo Code Sprint in Bonn

It’s been a great week in Bonn! I joined the other members of the QGIS project at the pre-FOSS4G code sprint at the Basecamp, the weirdest location we’ve had for a developer meeting so far. We used this opportunity to have a face-to-face meeting of the QGIS PSC  with special guests Matthias Kuhn (on QGIS 3.0 and bug tracker discussions) and Lene Fischer (on community team issues)  – notes here.

picture by Tim Sutton

QGIS PSC meeting in action (from left to right: Otto Dassau, Paolo Cavallini, Anita Graser, Andreas Neumann, Jürgen E. Fischer), picture by Tim Sutton

I also finally took the time to compile a blog post on the results of the QGIS user survey 2015.

The code sprint was also a great opportunity to present the results of Akbar Gumbira’s Google Summer of Code project: the QGIS Resource Sharing plugin. This plugin makes it possible to easily share resources (such as SVG icons, symbol definitions, QGIS styles, and Processing scripts) with other QGIS users through an interface that closely resembles the well-known QGIS Plugin Manager. Akbar has also prepared great presentation with background info and screencasts showcasing his project.

QGIS Resource Sharing presentation, picture by @foss4g

QGIS Resource Sharing presentation, picture by @foss4g

The plugin is now available in the Plugin Repository and we have created the official QGIS Resources repository on Github. If you have symbols or styles that you want to share with the community, please create a resource collection and send us a pull request to add it to the official list.

Thanks to all the organizers who worked hard to make this one of the most well-organized and enjoyable code sprints I’ve ever been to. You are awesome!


What are trusted plugins?

The core team of QGIS strives hard to provide the most advanced and user friendly GIS for free use by everyone. In the core QGIS project, every line of code that gets committed is subject to peer review when contributed by a non core developer. This gives us an opportunity to identify and correct inadvertent (or intentional) security issues that a developer may introduce into the code base. By contrast, all of the plugins that are published via the QGIS plugin repository are reviewed by the plugin developers themselves and we don’t have good insight into how much due diligence is applied to plugin code management.

The vast majority of our plugins (listed in http://plugins.qgis.org/ and inside your copy of QGIS) are developed by third parties, either individuals, companies, and institutions. As such, they are outside our direct control and the developers often relatively unknown to the QGIS community. We view this as a potential security risk. We are convinced the risk is small, because of many factors including the “many eyes” principle (the code is visible to everybody, and in use by thousands of people), but cannot exclude the possibility that someone tries to inject malicious code into a plugin.

In order to address this situation, we looked into the opportunity of implementing automatic tools to scan plugins, before their publication, and spot potential problems. Our research indicated that this approach would be difficult and costly, and easy to circumvent.

We (the PSC) therefore decided to implement a simple yet robust approach to security, based on the ‘web of trust’ principle: we trust people we know well in the community. You will see on the http://plugins.qgis.org web site that there is a ‘Trusted Author’ tag has been applied to plugins created by those members of the community that we know and trust.

The criteria for ‘Trusted Authors’ includes those community members that regularly meet at our QGIS developer meetings, and and those that are in almost daily contact with the core team via our developer mailing lists or background project discussions. The remaining plugins (and there are wonderful, reliable, robust, and useful plugins in the list) have not been given the ‘trusted’ label.

We would be delighted if a side effect of this choice would be to stimulate more active and direct involvement of plugin developers in the QGIS community. All plugin developers are therefore invited to join us at one of the next developer meetings (AKA HackFest), or otherwise become a recognized, active member of the community, so they can be integrated as ‘trusted’ plugin developers.


Results of the QGIS user survey 2015

In autumn last year, we ran a rather large-scale user survey, which was translated into many languages and advertised here on this blog. The final reports can be found here:

(Let me know if you have links to other language versions which were not sent to the mailing list.)

Looking at the English report, most responses were filed by regular (49.7%) and advanced users (35.9%) who use QGIS at least several times per week. One interesting result is that responders feel that the project should still prioritise new features when spending funds:

Top 3 “highest priority for spending QGIS funds”

  1. Important features that are missing (50%)
  2. More bugfixing (24.1%)
  3. Improved user documentation (12.4%)

This is also confirmed by the free comments section were roughly 23% of responders were asking for new features, 19% called for more stability (fewer releases and new features), and 9% for better documentation.

Documentation improvements were followed closely by calls for a more structured approach to plugins (making it easier to find the right tool for the job), stricter plugin documentation requirements, consolidation of plugins with similar functionality, and integration of key plugins into core.

When interpreting these results, it’s important to keep in mind that responses are skewed towards experienced users, who are more likely to require specialist functionality. Beginners on the other hand might rank stability, ease of use of core functionality, and good documentation higher.


City flows unfolding with the other Processing

A previous version of this post has been published in German on Die bemerkenswerte Karte.

Visualizations of mobility data such as taxi or bike sharing trips have become very popular. One of the best most recent examples is cf. city flows developed by Till Nagel and Christopher Pietsch at the FH Potsdam. cf. city flows visualizes the rides in bike sharing systems in New York, Berlin and London at different levels of detail, from overviews of the whole city to detailed comparisons of individual stations:

The visualizations were developed using Unfolding, a library to create interactive maps and geovisualizations in Processing (the other Processing … not the QGIS Processing toolbox) and Java. (I tinkered with the Python port of Processing in 2012, but this is certainly on a completely different level.)

The insights into the design process, which are granted in the methodology section section of the project website are particularly interesting. Various approaches for presenting traffic flows between the stations were tested. Building on initial simple maps, where stations were connected by straight lines, consecutive design decisions are described in detail:

The results are impressive. Particularly the animated trips convey the dynamics of urban mobility very well:

However, a weak point of this (and many similar projects) is the underlying data. This is also addressed directly by the project website:

Lacking actual GPS tracks, the trip trajectories are rendered as smooth paths of the calculated optimal bike routes

This means that the actual route between start and drop off location is not known. The authors therefore estimated the routes using HERE’s routing service. The visualization therefore only shows one of many possible routes. However, cyclists don’t necessarily choose the “best” route as determined by an algorithm – be it the most direct or otherwise preferred. The visualization does not account for this uncertainty in the route selection. Rather, it gives the impression that the cyclist actually traveled on a certain route. It would therefore be undue to use this visualization to derive information about the popularity of certain routes (for example, for urban planning). Moreover, the data only contains information about the fulfilled demand, since only trips that were really performed are recorded. Demand for trips which could not take place due to lack of bicycles or stations, is therefore missing.

As always: exercise some caution when interpreting statistics or visualizations and then sit back and enjoy the animations.

If you want to read more about GIS and transportation modelling, check out
Loidl, M.; Wallentin, G.; Cyganski, R.; Graser, A.; Scholz, J.; Haslauer, E. GIS and Transport Modeling—Strengthening the Spatial Perspective. ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2016, 5, 84. (It’s open access.)


Special FOSS4G offer: 25% off QGIS Map Design

FOSS4G2016 is drawing closer quickly. To get in the mood for a week full of of geogeekery, Locate Press is offering a special FOSS4G discount for QGIS Map Design.

Use the code foss4gbonn to get 25% off your copy.

QGIS Map Design is the reference book to get if you want to bring your mapping skills up to speed. The book comes with a download for all our example map projects:

qmd114 qmd132 qmd140 qmd128 qmd174 qmd58 qmd152 qmd158 qmd64 qmd46 qmd146 qmd188 qmd164 qmd20 qmd90 qmd78 qmd84 qmd108 qmd184 qmd34 qmd180 qmd120 qmd26 qmd104 qmd168 qmd100 qmd52

Looking forward to meeting you in Bonn!


How to effectively get things changed in QGIS – a follow up

Last week I posted regarding some thoughts I’ve had recently concerning what I perceive as a general confusion about how QGIS is developed and how users can successfully get things to change in the project. The post certainly started a lot of conversation! However, based on feedback received I realise some parts of the posts were being misinterpreted and some clarification is needed. So here we go…

1. Please keep filing bug reports/feature requests

I don’t think I was very clear about this – but my original post wasn’t meant to be a discouragement from filing bug reports or feature requests. The truth is that there is a LOT of value in these reports, and if you don’t file a report then the QGIS team will never be aware of the bug or your feature idea. Here’s some reasons why you SHOULD file a report:

  • QGIS developers are a conscientious mob, and generally take responsibility for any regressions they’ve caused by changes they’ve made. In other words, there’s very much an attitude of “I-broke-it, I’ll-fix-it” in the project. So, if a new feature is buggy or has broken something else then filing bugs ASAP is the best way to make the developer aware of these issues. In my experience they’ll usually be addressed rapidly.
  • As mentioned in the original post – there’s always a pre-release bug fix sprint, so filing a bug (especially if it’s a critical one) may mean that it’s addressed during this sprint.
  • Filing feature requests can gain traction if your idea is innovative, novel, or interesting enough to grab a developer’s attention!

Speaking for myself, I regularly check new incoming tickets (at least once a day), and I know I’m not the only one. So filing a report WILL bring your issue to developer’s attention. Which leads to…

2. Frustration is understandable!

I can honestly understand why people get frustrated and resort to an aggressive “why hasn’t this been fixed yet?!” style reply. I believe that these complaints are caused because people have the misunderstanding that filing a bug report is the ONLY thing they can do to get an issue fixed. If filing a report IS the only avenue you have to get something fixed/implemented, then it’s totally understandable to be annoyed when your ticket gets no results. This is a failing on behalf of the project though – we need to be clearly communicating that filing a report is the LEAST you can do. It’s a good first step, but on its own it’s just the beginning and needs to be followed up by one of the methods I described in the initial post.

3. It applies to more than just code

When I wrote the original piece I focused on just the code aspect of the QGIS project. That’s only because I’m a developer and it’s the area I know best. But it applies equally across the whole project, including documentation, translations, infrastructure, websites, packaging QGIS releases, etc. In fact, some of these non-code areas are the best entry points into the project as they don’t require a development background, and eg the documentation and translation teams have done a great job making it easy to submit contributions. Find something missing in the QGIS documentation? Add it yourself! Missing a translation of the website which prevents QGIS adoption within your community? Why not sponsor a translator to tackle this task?!

4. It applies to more than just QGIS!

Again, I wrote the original piece focusing on QGIS because that’s the project I’m most familiar with. You could just as easily substitute GDAL, GEOS, OpenLayers, PostGIS, Geoserver, R, D3, etc… in and it would be equally valid!

Hopefully that helps clarify some of the points raised by the earlier article. Let’s keep the discussion flowing – I’d love to hear if you have any other suggestions or questions raised by this topic.

 

 

 

 

Exploring variables in QGIS pt 3: layer level variables

In part 3 of my exploration of variables in QGIS 2.12, I’m going to dig into how variables are scoped in QGIS and what layer level variables are available (you can read parts 1 and 2 for a general introduction to variables).

Some background

Before we get to the good stuff, a bit of background in how variables work behind-the-scenes is important. Whenever an expression is evaluated in QGIS the context of the expression is considered. The context is built up from a set of scopes, which are all stacked on top of each other in order from least-specific to most-specific. It’s easier to explain with an example. Let’s take an expression used to set the source of a picture in a map composer. When this expression is evaluated, the context will consist of:

  1. The global scope, consisting of variables set in the QGIS options dialog, and other installation-wide properties
  2. The project scope, which includes variables set in the Project Properties dialog and the auto-generated project variables like @project_path, @project_title (you can read more about this in part 2)
  3. composer scope, with any variables set for the current composer, plus variables for @layout_pagewidth, @layout_pageheight, @layout_numpages, etc.
  4. composer item scope for the picture, with item-specific variables including @item_id

The more specific scopes will override any existing clashing variables from less specific scopes. So a global @my_var variable will be overridden by an @my_var variable set for the composer:

overridden

Another example. Let’s consider now an expression set for a data-defined label size. When this expression is evaluated the context will depend on where the map is being rendered. If it’s in the main map canvas then the context will be:

  1. The global scope
  2. The project scope
  3. map settings scope, with variables relating to how the map is being rendered. Eg @map_rotation, @map_scale, etc
  4. layer scope. More on this later, but the layer scope includes layer-level variables plus preset variables for @layer_name and @layer_id

If instead the map is being rendered inside a map item in a map composer, the context will be:

  1. The global scope
  2. The project scope
  3. The composer scope
  4. An atlas scope, if atlas is enabled. This contains variables like @atlas_pagename, @atlas_feature, @atlas_totalfeatures.
  5. composer item scope for the map item
  6. map settings scope (with scale and rotation determined by the map item’s settings)
  7. The layer scope

Using layer level variables

Ok, enough with the details. The reason I’ve explained all this is to help explain when layer level variables come into play. Basically, they’ll be available whenever an expression is evaluated inside of a particular layer. This includes data defined symbology and labeling, field calculator, and diagrams. You can’t use a layer-level variable inside a composer label, because there’s no layer scope used when evaluating this. Make sense? Great! To set a layer level variable, you use the Variables section in the Layer Properties dialog:

Setting a layer variablee
Setting a layer variable

Any layer level variables you set will be saved inside your current project, i.e. layer variables are per-layer and per-project. You can also see in the above screenshot that as well as the layer level variables QGIS also lists the existing variables from the Project and Global scopes. This helps show exactly what variables are accessible by the layer and whether they’ve been overridden by any scopes. You can also see that there’s two automatic variables, @layer_id and @layer_name, which contain the unique layer ID and user-set layer name too.

Potential use cases for layer-level variables

In the screenshot above I’ve set two variables, @class1_threshold and @class2_threshold. I’m going to use these to sync up some manual class breaks between rule based symbology and rule based labeling. Here’s how I’ve set up the rule-based symbols for the layer:

Rule based symbology using layer level variables
Rule based symbology using layer level variables

In a similar way, I’ve also created matching rule-based labeling (another new feature in QGIS 2.12):

Matching rule-based labels
Matching rule-based labels

Here’s what my map looks like now, with label and symbol colors matched:

*Map for illustrative purposes only... not for cartographic/visual design excellence!
*Map for illustrative purposes only… not for cartographic/visual design excellence!

If I’d hard-coded the manual class breaks, it would be a pain to keep the labeling and symbology in sync. I’d have to make sure that the breaks are updated everywhere I’ve used them in both the symbology and labeling settings. Aside from being boring, tedious work, this would also prevent immediate before/after comparisons. Using variables instead means that I can update the break value in a single place (the variables panel) and have all my labeling and symbols immediately reflect this change when I hit apply!

Another recent use case I had was teaming layer-level variables along with Time Manager. I wanted my points to falloff in both transparency and size with age, and this involved data defined symbol settings scattered all throughout my layer symbology. By storing the decay fall-off rate in a variable, I could again tweak this falloff by changing the value in a single place and immediately see the result. It also helps with readability of the data defined expressions. Instead of trying to decipher a random, hard-coded value, it’s instead immediately obvious that this value relates to a decay fall-off rate. Much nicer!

I’m sure there’s going to be hundreds of novel uses of layer-level variables which I never planned for when adding this feature. I’d love to hear about them though – leave a comment if you’d like to share your ideas!

One last thing – the new “layer_property” function

This isn’t strictly related to variables, but another new feature which was introduced in QGIS 2.12 was a new “layer_property” expression function. This function allows you to retrieve any one of a bunch of properties relating to a specific map layer, including the layer CRS, metadata, source path, etc.

This function can be used anywhere in QGIS. For instance, it allows you to insert dynamic metadata about layers into a print composer layout. In the screenshot below I’ve used expressions like layer_property(‘patron’,’crs’) and layer_property(‘patron’,’source’) to insert the CRS and source path of the “patron” layer into the label. If either the CRS or the file path ever changes, this label will be automatically updated to reflect the new values.

Inserting dynamic layer properties into a composer label
Inserting dynamic layer properties into a composer label

 

So there you go – layer level variables and the layer_property function – here in QGIS 2.12 and making your workflow in QGIS easier. In the final part of this series, we’ll explore the magical @value variable. Trust me, I’ve saved the best for last!

Recent labelling improvements in QGIS master

If you’re not like me and don’t keep a constant eye over at QGIS development change log (be careful – it’s addictive!), then you’re probably not aware of a bunch of labelling improvements which recently landed in QGIS master version. I’ve been working recently on a large project which involves a lot (>300) of atlas map outputs, and due to the size of this project it’s not feasible to manually tweak placements of labels. So, I’ve been totally at the mercy of QGIS’ labelling engine for automatic label placements. Generally it’s quite good but there were a few things missing which would help this project. Fortunately, due to the open-source nature of QGIS, I’ve been able to dig in and enhance the label engine to handle these requirements (insert rhetoric about beauty of open source here!). Let’s take a look at them one-by-one:

Data defined quadrant in “Around Point” placement mode

First up, it’s now possible to specify a data defined quadrant when a point label is set to the Around Point placement mode. In the past, you had a choice of either Around Point mode, in which QGIS automatically places labels around point features in order to maximise the number of labels shown, or the Offset from Point mode, in which all labels are placed at a specified position relative to the points (eg top-left). In Offset from Point mode you could use data defined properties to force labels for a feature to be placed at a specific relative position by binding the quadrant to a field in your data. This allowed you to manually tweak the placement for individual labels, but at the cost of every other label being forced to the same relative position. Now, you’ve also got the option to data define the relative position when in Around Point mode, so that the rest of the labels will fall back to being automatically placed. Here’s a quick example – I’ll start with a layer with labels in Around Point mode:

Around Point placement mode
Around Point placement mode

You can see that some labels are sitting to the top right of the points, others to the bottom right, and some in the top middle, in order to fit all the labels for these points. With this new option, I can setup a data defined quadrant for the labels, and then force the ‘Tottenham’ label (top left of the map) to display below and to the left of the point:

Setting a data-defined quadrant
Setting a data-defined quadrant

Here’s what the result looks like:

Manually setting the quadrant for the Tottenham label
Manually setting the quadrant for the Tottenham label

The majority of the labels are still auto-placed, but Tottenham is now force to the lower left corner.

Data defined label priority

Another often-requested feature which landed recently is the ability to set the priority for individual labels. QGIS has long had the ability to set the priority for an entire labelling layer, but you couldn’t control the priority of features within a layer. That would lead to situations like that shown below, where the most important central station (the green point) hasn’t been labelled:

What... no label for the largest station in Melbourne?
What… no label for the largest station in Melbourne?

By setting a data defined priority for labels, I can set the priority either via values manually entered in a field or by taking advantage of an existing “number of passengers” field present in my data. End result is that this central station is now prioritised over any others:

Much better! (in case you're wondering... I've manually forced some other non-optimal placement settings for illustrative purposes!)
Much better! (in case you’re wondering… I’ve manually forced some other non-optimal placement settings for illustrative purposes!)

Obstacle only layers

The third new labelling feature is the option for “Obstacle only” layers. What this option does is allow a non-labelled layer to act as an obstacle for the labels in other layers, so they will be discouraged from drawing labels over the features in the obstacle layer. Again, it’s best demonstrated with an example. Here’s my stations layer with labels placed automatically – you can see that some labels are placed right over the features in the rail lines layer:

Labels over rail lines...
Labels over rail lines…

Now, let’s set the rail lines layer to act as an obstacle for other labels:

... setting the layer as an obstacle...
… setting the layer as an obstacle…

The result is that labels will be placed so that they don’t cover the rail lines anymore! (Unless there’s no other choice). Much nicer.

No more clashing labels!
No more clashing labels!

Control over how polygons act as obstacles for labels

This change is something I’m really pleased about. It’s only applicable for certain situations, but when it works the improvements are dramatic.

Let’s start with my labelled stations map, this time with an administrative boundary layer in the background:

Stations with administrative boundaries
Stations with administrative boundaries

Notice anything wrong with this map? If you’re like me, you won’t be able to look past those labels which cross over the admin borders. Yuck. What’s happening here is that although my administrative regions layer is set to discourage labels being placed over features, there’s actually nowhere that labels can possibly be placed which will avoid this. The admin layer covers the entire map, so regardless of where the labels are placed they will always cover an administrative polygon feature. This is where the new option to control how polygon layers act as obstacles comes to the rescue:

...change a quick setting...
…change a quick setting…

Now, I can set the administrative layer to only avoid placing labels over feature’s boundaries! I don’t care that they’ll still be placed inside the features (since we have no choice!), but I don’t want them sitting on top of these boundaries. The result is a big improvement:

Much better!
Much better!

Now, QGIS has avoided placing labels over the boundaries between regions. Better auto-placement of labels like this means much less time required manually tweaking their positioning, and that’s always a good thing!

Draw only labels which fit inside a polygon

The last change is fairly self explanatory, so no nice screenshots here. QGIS now has the ability to prevent drawing labels which are too large to fit inside their corresponding polygon features. Again, in certain circumstances this can make a huge cartographic improvement to your map.

So there you go. Lots of new labelling goodies to look forward to when QGIS 2.12 rolls around.

 

Point cluster renderer crowdfund launched!

We’ve just launched a new crowd funding campaign to implement a live point cluster renderer within QGIS. Full details are available on the campaign page.

clusterer

This is a really exciting new feature which would help make possible some neat styling effects which just aren’t possible in QGIS at the moment. To make it possible we need 2300€ pledged before 31 August. You can help make this a reality by supporting the campaign or by sharing the page and increasing exposure to the campaign. Updates to follow!

The road to QGIS 3.0 – part 1

qgis_icon.svgAs we discussed in QGIS 3 is under way, the QGIS project is working toward the next major version of the application and these developments have major impact on any custom scripts or plugins you’ve developed for QGIS.

We’re now just over a week into this work, and already there’s been tons of API breaking changes landing the code base. In this post we’ll explore some of these changes, what’s motivated them, and what they mean for your scripts.

The best source for keeping track of these breaking changes is to watch the API break documentation on GitHub. This file is updated whenever a change lands which potentially breaks plugins/scripts, and will eventually become a low-level guide to porting plugins to QGIS 3.0.

API clean-ups

So far, lots of the changes which have landed have related to cleaning up the existing API. These include:

Removal of deprecated API calls

The API has been frozen since QGIS 2.0 was released in 2013, and in the years since then many things have changed. As a result, different parts of the API were deprecated along the way as newer, better ways of doing things were introduced. The deprecated code was left intact so that QGIS 2.x plugins would still all function correctly. By removing these older, deprecated code paths it enables the QGIS developers to streamline the code, remove hacky workarounds, untested methods, and just generally “clean things up”. As an example, the older labelling system which pre-dates QGIS 2.0 (it had no collision detection, no curved labels, no fancy data defined properties or rule based labelling!) was still floating around just in case someone tried to open a QGIS 1.8 project. That’s all gone now, culling over 5000 lines of outdated, unmaintained code. Chances are this won’t affect your plugins in the slightest. Other removals, like the removal of QgsMapRenderer (the renderer used before multi-threaded rendering was introduced) likely have a much larger impact, as many scripts and plugins were still using QgsMapRenderer classes and calls. These all need to be migrated to the new QgsMapRendererJob and QgsMapSettings classes.

Renaming things for consistency

Consistent naming helps keep the API predictable and more user friendly. Lots of changes have landed so far to make the naming of classes and methods more consistent. These include things like:

  • Making sure names use consistent capitalization. Eg, there was previously methods named “writeXML” and “writeXml”. These have all been renamed to consistently use camel case, including for acronyms. (In case you’re wondering – this convention is used to follow the Qt library conventions).
  • Consistent use of terms. The API previously used a mix of “CRS” and “SRS” for similar purposes – it now consistently uses “CRS” for a coordinate reference system.
  • Removal of abbreviations. Lots of abbreviated words have been removed from the names, eg “destCrs” has become “destinationCrs”. The API wasn’t consistently using the same abbreviations (ie “dest”/”dst”/”destination”), so it was decided to remove all use of abbreviated words and replace them with the full word. This helps keep things predictable, and is also a bit friendlier for non-native English speakers.

The naming changes all need to be addressed to make existing scripts and plugins compatible with QGIS 3.0. It’s potentially quite a lot of work for plugin developers, but in the long term it will make the API easier to use.

Changes to return and argument types

There’s also been lots of changes relating to the types of objects returned by functions, or the types of objects used as function arguments. Most of these involve changing the c++ types from pointers to references, or from references to copies. These changes are being made to strengthen the API and avoid potential crashes. In most cases they don’t have any affect on PyQGIS code, with some exceptions:

  • Don’t pass Python “None” objects as QgsCoordinateReferenceSystems or as QgsCoordinateTransforms. In QGIS 3.0 you must pass invalid QgsCoordinateReferenceSystem objects (“QgsCoordinateReferenceSystem()”) or invalid QgsCoordinateTransform (“QgsCoordinateTransform()”) objects instead.

Transparent caching of CRS creation

The existing QgsCRSCache class has been removed. This class was used to cache the expensive results of initializing a QgsCoordinateReferenceSystem object, so that creating the same CRS could be done instantly and avoid slow databases lookups. In QGIS 3.0 this caching is now handled transparently, so there is no longer a need for the separate QgsCRSCache and it has been removed. If you were using QgsCRSCache in your PyQGIS code, it will need to be removed and replaced with the standard QgsCoordinateReferenceSystem constructors.

This change has the benefit that many existing plugins which were not explicitly using QgsCRSCache will now gain the benefits of the faster caching mechanism – potentially this could dramatically speed up existing plugin algorithms.

In summary

The QGIS developers have been busy fixing, improving and cleaning up the PyQGIS API. We recognise that these changes result in significant work for plugin and script developers, so we’re committed to providing quality documentation for how to adapt your code for these changes, and we will also investigate the use of automated tools to help ease your code transition to QGIS 3.0. We aren’t making changes lightly, but instead are carefully refining the API to make it more predictable, streamlined and stable.

If you’d like assistance with (or to outsource) the transition of your existing QGIS scripts and plugins to QGIS 3.0, just contact us at North Road to discuss. Every day we’re directly involved in the changes moving to QGIS 3.0, so we’re ideally placed to make this transition painless for you!

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