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Mon Jun 26 09:00:12 2017

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QGIS Planet

QGIS Layout and Reporting Engine Campaign – a success!

Thanks to the tireless efforts and incredible generosity of the QGIS user community, our crowdfunded QGIS Layout and Reporting Engine campaign was a tremendous success! We’ve reached the funding goal for this project, and as a result QGIS 3.0 will include a more powerful print composer with a reworked code base. You can read more about what we have planned at the campaign page.

We’d like to take this opportunity to extend our heartfelt thanks to all the backers who have pledged to support this project:

We’ve also received numerous anonymous contributions in addition to these – please know that the QGIS community extends their gratitude for your contributions too! This campaign was also successful thanks to The Agency for Data Supply and Efficiency, Denmark, who stepped up and have funded an initial component of this project directly.

We’d also like to thank every member of the QGIS community who assisted with promoting this campaign and bringing it to the attention of these backers. Without your efforts we would not have been able to reach these backers and the campaign would not have been successful.

We’ll be posting more updates as this work progresses. Stay tuned…

 

About label halos

A lot of cartographers have a love/hate relationship with label halos. On one hand they can be an essential technique for improving label readability, especially against complex background layers. On the other hand they tend to dominate maps and draw unwanted attention to the map labels.

In this post I’m going to share my preferred techniques for using label halos. I personally find this technique is a good approach which minimises the negative effects of halos, while still providing a good boost to label readability. (I’m also going to share some related QGIS 3.0 news at the end of this post!)

Let’s start with some simple white labels over an aerial image:

These labels aren’t very effective. The complex background makes them hard to read, especially the “Winton Shire” label at the bottom of the image. A quick and nasty way to improve readability is to add a black halo around the labels:

Sure, it’s easy to read the labels now, but they stand out way too much and it’s difficult to see anything here except the labels!

We can improve this somewhat through a better choice of halo colour:

This is much better. We’ve got readable labels which aren’t too domineering. Unfortunately the halo effect is still very prominent, especially where the background image varies a lot. In this case it works well for the labels toward the middle of the map, but not so well for the labels at the top and bottom.

A good way to improve this is to take advantage of blending (or “composition”) modes (which QGIS has native support for). The white labels will be most readable when there’s a good contrast with the background map, i.e. when the background map is dark. That’s why we choose a halo colour which is darker than the text colour (or vice versa if you’ve got dark coloured labels). Unfortunately, by choosing the mid-toned brown colour to make the halos blend in more, we are actually lightening up parts of this background layer and both reducing the contrast with the label and also making the halo more visible. By using the “darken” blend mode, the brown halo will only be drawn for pixels were the brown is darker then the existing background. It will darken light areas of the image, but avoid lightening pixels which are already dark and providing good contrast. Here’s what this looks like:

The most noticeable differences are the labels shown above darker areas – the “Winton Shire” label at the bottom and the “Etheridge Shire” at the top. For both these labels the halo is almost imperceptible whilst still subtly doing it’s part to make the label readable. (If you had dark label text with a lighter halo color, you can use the “lighten” blend mode for the same result).

The only issue with this map is that the halo is still very obvious around “Shire” in “Richmond Shire” and “McKinlay” on the left of the map. This can be reduced by applying a light blur to the halo:

There’s almost no loss of readability by applying this blur, but it’s made those last prominent halos disappear into the map. At first glance you probably wouldn’t even notice that there’s any halos being used here. But if we compare back against the original map (which used no halos) we can see the huge difference in readability:

Compare especially the Winton Shire label at the bottom, and the Richmond Shire label in the middle. These are much clearer on our tweaked map versus the above image.

Now for the good news… when QGIS 3.0 is released you’ll no longer have to rely on an external illustration/editing application to get this effect with your maps. In fact, QGIS 3.0 is bringing native support for applying many types of live layer effects to label buffers and background shapes, including blur. This means it will be possible to reproduce this technique directly inside your GIS, no external editing or tweaking required!

New map coloring algorithms in QGIS 3.0

It’s been a long time since I last blogged here. Let’s just blame that on the amount of changes going into QGIS 3.0 and move on…

One new feature which landed in QGIS 3.0 today is a processing algorithm for automatic coloring of a map in such a way that adjoining polygons are all assigned different color indexes. Astute readers may be aware that this was possible in earlier versions of QGIS through the use of either the (QGIS 1.x only!) Topocolor plugin, or the Coloring a map plugin (2.x).

What’s interesting about this new processing algorithm is that it introduces several refinements for cartographically optimising the coloring. The earlier plugins both operated by pure “graph” coloring techniques. What this means is that first a graph consisting of each set of adjoining features is generated. Then, based purely on this abstract graph, the coloring algorithms are applied to optimise the solution so that connected graph nodes are assigned different colors, whilst keeping the total number of colors required minimised.

The new QGIS algorithm works in a different way. Whilst the first step is still calculating the graph of adjoining features (now super-fast due to use of spatial indexes and prepared geometry intersection tests!), the colors for the graph are assigned while considering the spatial arrangement of all features. It’s gone from a purely abstract mathematical solution to a context-sensitive cartographic solution.

The “Topological coloring” processing algorithm

Let’s explore the differences. First up, the algorithm has an option for the “minimum distance between features”. It’s often the case that features aren’t really touching, but are instead just very close to each other. Even though they aren’t touching, we still don’t want these features to be assigned the same color. This option allows you to control the minimum distance which two features can be to each other before they can be assigned the same color.

The biggest change comes in the “balancing” techniques available in the new algorithm. By default, the algorithm now tries to assign colors in such a way that the total number of features assigned each color is equalised. This avoids having a color which is only assigned to a couple of features in a large dataset, resulting in an odd looking map coloration.

Balancing color assignment by count – notice how each class has a (almost!) equal count

Another available balancing technique is to balance the color assignment by total area. This technique assigns colors so that the total area of the features assigned to each color is balanced. This mode can be useful to help avoid large features resulting in one of the colors appearing more dominant on a colored map.

Balancing assignment by area – note how only one large feature is assigned the red color

The final technique, and my personal preference, is to balance colors by distance between colors. This mode will assign colors in order to maximize the distance between features of the same color. Maximising the distance helps to create a more uniform distribution of colors across a map, and avoids certain colors clustering in a particular area of the map. It’s my preference as it creates a really nice balanced map – at a glance the colors look “randomly” assigned with no discernible pattern to the arrangement.

Balancing colors by distance

As these examples show, considering the geographic arrangement of features while coloring allows us to optimise the assigned colors for cartographic output.

The other nice thing about having this feature implemented as a processing algorithm is that unlike standalone plugins, processing algorithms can be incorporated as just one step of a larger model (and also reused by other plugins!).

QGIS 3.0 has tons of great new features, speed boosts and stability bumps. This is just a tiny taste of the handy new features which will be available when 3.0 is released!

Point cluster renderer crowdfunding – successful!

Great news! Thanks in part to some generous last minute pledges, our QGIS Point Cluster Renderer campaign has successfully reached its target. This means that QGIS 3.0 will now include a full feature and flexible cluster renderer.

In the meantime, we’d like to extend our warmest thanks to the following generous contributors, whose pledges have made this work possible:

  • Andreas Neumann
  • Qtibia Engineering (Tudor Barascu)
  • Karl-Magnus Jönsson
  • Geonesia (Nicolas Ponzo)

Plus numerous additional anonymous backers whose generous contributions are also highly valued. If you run into any of these funders at a QGIS user group or conference, make sure you treat them like the GIS rock-stars they are!

Keep an eye out on our social media accounts as we’ll be posting more video demonstrations of this work as it lands in the QGIS codebase.

BOTH

The road to QGIS 3.0 – part 1

qgis_icon.svgAs we discussed in QGIS 3 is under way, the QGIS project is working toward the next major version of the application and these developments have major impact on any custom scripts or plugins you’ve developed for QGIS.

We’re now just over a week into this work, and already there’s been tons of API breaking changes landing the code base. In this post we’ll explore some of these changes, what’s motivated them, and what they mean for your scripts.

The best source for keeping track of these breaking changes is to watch the API break documentation on GitHub. This file is updated whenever a change lands which potentially breaks plugins/scripts, and will eventually become a low-level guide to porting plugins to QGIS 3.0.

API clean-ups

So far, lots of the changes which have landed have related to cleaning up the existing API. These include:

Removal of deprecated API calls

The API has been frozen since QGIS 2.0 was released in 2013, and in the years since then many things have changed. As a result, different parts of the API were deprecated along the way as newer, better ways of doing things were introduced. The deprecated code was left intact so that QGIS 2.x plugins would still all function correctly. By removing these older, deprecated code paths it enables the QGIS developers to streamline the code, remove hacky workarounds, untested methods, and just generally “clean things up”. As an example, the older labelling system which pre-dates QGIS 2.0 (it had no collision detection, no curved labels, no fancy data defined properties or rule based labelling!) was still floating around just in case someone tried to open a QGIS 1.8 project. That’s all gone now, culling over 5000 lines of outdated, unmaintained code. Chances are this won’t affect your plugins in the slightest. Other removals, like the removal of QgsMapRenderer (the renderer used before multi-threaded rendering was introduced) likely have a much larger impact, as many scripts and plugins were still using QgsMapRenderer classes and calls. These all need to be migrated to the new QgsMapRendererJob and QgsMapSettings classes.

Renaming things for consistency

Consistent naming helps keep the API predictable and more user friendly. Lots of changes have landed so far to make the naming of classes and methods more consistent. These include things like:

  • Making sure names use consistent capitalization. Eg, there was previously methods named “writeXML” and “writeXml”. These have all been renamed to consistently use camel case, including for acronyms. (In case you’re wondering – this convention is used to follow the Qt library conventions).
  • Consistent use of terms. The API previously used a mix of “CRS” and “SRS” for similar purposes – it now consistently uses “CRS” for a coordinate reference system.
  • Removal of abbreviations. Lots of abbreviated words have been removed from the names, eg “destCrs” has become “destinationCrs”. The API wasn’t consistently using the same abbreviations (ie “dest”/”dst”/”destination”), so it was decided to remove all use of abbreviated words and replace them with the full word. This helps keep things predictable, and is also a bit friendlier for non-native English speakers.

The naming changes all need to be addressed to make existing scripts and plugins compatible with QGIS 3.0. It’s potentially quite a lot of work for plugin developers, but in the long term it will make the API easier to use.

Changes to return and argument types

There’s also been lots of changes relating to the types of objects returned by functions, or the types of objects used as function arguments. Most of these involve changing the c++ types from pointers to references, or from references to copies. These changes are being made to strengthen the API and avoid potential crashes. In most cases they don’t have any affect on PyQGIS code, with some exceptions:

  • Don’t pass Python “None” objects as QgsCoordinateReferenceSystems or as QgsCoordinateTransforms. In QGIS 3.0 you must pass invalid QgsCoordinateReferenceSystem objects (“QgsCoordinateReferenceSystem()”) or invalid QgsCoordinateTransform (“QgsCoordinateTransform()”) objects instead.

Transparent caching of CRS creation

The existing QgsCRSCache class has been removed. This class was used to cache the expensive results of initializing a QgsCoordinateReferenceSystem object, so that creating the same CRS could be done instantly and avoid slow databases lookups. In QGIS 3.0 this caching is now handled transparently, so there is no longer a need for the separate QgsCRSCache and it has been removed. If you were using QgsCRSCache in your PyQGIS code, it will need to be removed and replaced with the standard QgsCoordinateReferenceSystem constructors.

This change has the benefit that many existing plugins which were not explicitly using QgsCRSCache will now gain the benefits of the faster caching mechanism – potentially this could dramatically speed up existing plugin algorithms.

In summary

The QGIS developers have been busy fixing, improving and cleaning up the PyQGIS API. We recognise that these changes result in significant work for plugin and script developers, so we’re committed to providing quality documentation for how to adapt your code for these changes, and we will also investigate the use of automated tools to help ease your code transition to QGIS 3.0. We aren’t making changes lightly, but instead are carefully refining the API to make it more predictable, streamlined and stable.

If you’d like assistance with (or to outsource) the transition of your existing QGIS scripts and plugins to QGIS 3.0, just contact us at North Road to discuss. Every day we’re directly involved in the changes moving to QGIS 3.0, so we’re ideally placed to make this transition painless for you!

QGIS 3 is underway – what does it mean for your plugins and scripts?

With the imminent release of QGIS 2.16, the development attention has now shifted to the next scheduled release – QGIS 3.0! If you haven’t been following the discussion surrounding this I’m going to try and summarise what exactly 3.0 means and how it will impact any scripts or plugins you’ve developed for QGIS.

qgis_icon.svgQGIS 3.0 is the first major QGIS release since 2.0 was released way back in September 2013. Since that release so much has changed in QGIS… a quick glance over the release notes for 2.14 shows that even for this single point release there’s been hundreds of changes. Despite this, for all 2.x releases the PyQGIS API has remained stable, and a plugin or script which was developed for use in QGIS 2.0 will still work in QGIS 2.16.

Version 3.0 will introduce the first PyQGIS API break since 2013. An API break like this is required to move QGIS to newer libraries such as Qt 5 and Python 3, and allows the development team the flexibility to tackle long-standing issues and limitations which cannot be fixed using the 2.x API. Unfortunately, the side effect of this API break is that the scripts and plugins which you use in QGIS 2.x will no longer work when QGIS 3.0 is released!

Numerous API breaking changes have already started to flow into QGIS, and 2.16 isn’t even yet publicly available. The best way to track these changes is to keep an eye on the “API changes” documentation.  This document describes all the changes which are flowing in which affect PyQGIS code, and describe how best they should be addressed by plugin and script maintainers. Some changes are quite trivial and easy to update code for, others are more extreme (such as changes surrounding moving to PyQt5 and Python 3) and may require significant time to adapt for.

I’d encourage all plugin and script developers to keep watching the API break documentation, and subscribe to the developers list for additional information about required changes as they are introduced.

If you’re looking for assistance or to outsource adaptation of your plugins and scripts to QGIS 3.0 – the team at North Road are ideally placed to assist! Our team includes some of the most experienced QGIS developers who are directly involved with the development of QGIS 3.0, so you can be confident knowing that your code is in good hands. Just contact us to discuss your QGIS development requirements.

You can read more about QGIS 3.0 API changes in The road to QGIS 3.0 – part 1.

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