Page 1 of 9 (162 posts)

  • talks about »
  • gis


Last update:
Fri Nov 27 09:20:15 2015

A Django site.

QGIS Planet

A new QGIS plugin allows dynamic filtering of values in forms



This plugin has been partially funded (50%) by ARPA Piemonte.


This is a core-enhancement QGIS plugin that makes the implementation of complex dynamic filters in QGIS attribute forms an easy task. For example, this widget can be used to implement drill-down forms, where the values available in one field depend on the values of other fields.


The plugin is available on the official QGIS Python Plugin Repository and the source code is on GitHub QGIS Form Value Relation plugin repository


The new “Form Value Relation” widget is essentially a clone of the core “Value Relation” widget with some important differences:

When the widget is created:

  • the whole unfiltered features of the related layer are loaded and cached
  • the form values of all the attributes are added to the context (see below)
  • the filtering against the expression happens every time the widget is refreshed
  • a signal is bound to the form changes and if the changed field is present in
    the filter expression, the features are filtered against the expression and
    the widget is refreshed

Using form values in the expression

A new expression function is available (in the “Custom” section):


This function returns the current value of a field in the editor form.


  1. This function can only be used inside forms and it’s particularly useful when used together with the custom widget `Form Value Relation`
  2. If the field does not exists the function returns an empty string.

Visual guide

This is the new widget in action: changing the field FK_PROV, the ISTAT values are filtered according to the filter expression.

The new widget in action

The new widget drill-down in action


Choosing the new widget

Configuring the widget

Configuring the widget

Configuring the expression

Configuring the expression to read FK_PROV value from the form

News from QGIS HackFest in Las Palmas

First I wish to thank Pablo & friends for the amazing organization, unfortunately I couldn’t spend more than two full days there, but those two days have been memorable!

Here is a picture of one of the most interesting discussions (photo: courtesy of Pablo).

QGIS discussion at the developer meeting in Las Palmas

An hack fest is an event for writing good code but what it’s really good at is to establish and cultivate relations with other coders, to exchange opinions and ideas and last but not least to have some fun and make new friends.


This time, we have had many interesting presentations and a couple of meetings where we spoke about technical aspects of the project management and infrastructure and about some important challenges, both in terms of code size and economical implications for who relies on it, that a growing project must face.


The latter was something I’ve also been considering for a while: now that pull requests (PR) for new features are coming down the pipeline, we must find a better way to manage their queue by giving a clear and transparent approval path and deadline. This management and approval process cannot rely entirely on volunteer work, the main reason being that most of the times the PR proposers have been paid for that PR and it’s not fair (nor reliable) that the (sometimes hard) job of doing a code review is not rewarded. On the other end, an investor cannot waste its time and money on a project without having a reasonable good chance to see its work eventually land into the core of QGIS.


Hugo (thanks for that!) organized a meeting to discuss this topic, that crosses personal business interests, ethical considerations and personal beliefs to a point that it’s not really easy to discuss in a calm and objective way, despite the premises, the discussion was very interesting and constructive and a QEP that tries to address at least some of this problems is open for discussion right now:


Another topic we’ve been discussing was how to manage python plugin dependencies, we’ve decided to start by adding a new metadata tag called external_deps that’s supposed to contain the PIP install string for the required packages, since PIP will be a builtin in python 3.4, that will probably solve most of our problems when we’ll integrate that into the plugin manager. At the moment the metadata is not documented nor required, but it’s there to allow for experiments.


We didn’t miss the occasion to talk about the ugly bug that affects fTools, not something I’m going to dig into in this post though.


Of course an hack fest is still a good opportunity for squashing bugs and implement new cool features, I’ve been busy mainly on the following topics:

  1. HiDPI screen support for web view widgets (help and plugin manager/installer)
  2. Form relations editing longstanding bugs
  3. New feature to optionally enter, edit and store Python form init code into the project (and DB), see the picture below
  4. Plugins website maintenance (added new metadata and fixed a few bugs, added an RPC call to export author email for admins)
New QGIS feature to store form init code


Thanks to all participants, to the organizers and to all QGIS sponsors and donors that made this possible!


Quick webmaps with qgis2web

In Publishing interactive web maps using QGIS, I presented two plugins for exporting web maps from QGIS. Today, I want to add an new member to this family: the qgis2web plugin is the successor of qgis-ol3 and combines exports to both OpenLayers3 as well as Leaflet.

The plugin is under active development and currently not all features are supported for both OpenLayers3 and Leaflet, but it’s a very convenient way to kick-off a quick webmapping project.

Here’s an example of an OpenLayers3 preview with enabled popups:

OpenLayers3 preview

OpenLayers3 preview

And here is the same map in Leaflet with the added bonus of a nice address search bar which can be added automatically as well:

Leaflet preview

Leaflet preview

The workflow is really straight forward: select the desired layers and popup settings, pick some appearance extras, and then don’t forget to hit the Update preview button otherwise you might be wondering why nothing happens ;)

I’ll continue testing these plugins and am looking forward to seeing what features the future will bring.

What went on at FOSS4G 2015?

Granted, I could only follow FOSS4G 2015 remotely on social media but what I saw was quite impressive and will keep me busy exploring for quite a while. Here’s my personal pick of this year’s highlights which I’d like to share with you:


Marco Hugentobler at FOSS4G 2015 (Photo by Jody Garnett)

Marco Hugentobler at FOSS4G 2015 (Photo by Jody Garnett)

The Sourcepole team has been particularly busy with four presentations which you can find on their blog.

Marco Hugentobler’s keynote is just great, summing up the history of the QGIS project and discussing success factor for open source projects.

Marco also gave a second presentation on new QGIS features for power users, including live layer effects, new geometry support (curves!), and geometry checker.

There has also been an update to QTiles plugin by NextGIS this week.

If you’re a bit more into webmapping, Victor Olaya presented the Web App Builder he’s been developing at Boundless. Web App Builder should appear in the official plugin repo soon.

Preview of Web App Builder from Victors presentation

Preview of Web App Builder from Victors presentation


If you work with messy, real-world data, you’ve most certainly been fighting with geocoding services, trying to make the best of a bunch of address lists. The Python Geocoder library promises to make dealing with geocoding services such as Google, Bing, OSM & many easier than ever before.

Let me know if you tried it.

Mobmap Visualizations

Mobmap – or more specifically Mobmap2 – is an extension for Chrome which offers visualization and analysis capabilities for trajectory data. I haven’t tried it yet but their presentation certainly looks very interesting:

FOSS4G specials at Packt and Locate Press

We are celebrating FOSS4G 2015 in Seoul with great open source GIS book discounts at both Packt and Locate Press. So if you don’t have a copy of “Learning QGIS”, “The PyQGIS Programmer’s Guide”, or “Geospatial Power Tools” yet, check out the following sites:


Using TimeManager for WMS-T layers

This is a guest post by Karolina Alexiou (aka carolinux), Anita’s collaborator on the Time Manager plugin.

As of version 2.1.5, TimeManager provides some support for stepping through WMS-T layers, a format about which Anita has written  in the past.  From the official definition, the OpenGIS® Web Map Service Interface Standard (WMS) provides a simple HTTP interface for requesting geo-registered map images from one or more distributed geospatial databases. A WMS request defines the geographic layer(s) and area of interest to be processed. The response to the request is one or more geo-registered map images (returned as JPEG, PNG, etc) that can be displayed in a browser application. QGIS can display those images as a raster layer. The WMS-T standard allows the user of the service to set a time boundary in addition to a geographical boundary with their HTTP request.

We are going to add the following url as the web map provider service:

From QGIS, go to Layer>Add Layer>Add WMS/WMST Layer and add a new server and connect to it. For the service we have chosen, we only need to specify a name and the url.

Select the top level layer, in our case named nexrad_base_reflect and click Add. Now you have added the layer to your QGIS project.

To add it to TimeManager as well, add it as a raster with the settings from the screenshot below. Start time and end time have the values 2005-08-29:03:10:00Z and 2005-08-30:03:10:00Z respectively, which is a period which overlaps with hurricane Katrina. Now, the WMS-T standard uses a handful of different time formats, and at this time, the plugin requires you to know this format and input the start and end values in this format. If there’s interest to sponsor this feature, in the future we may get the format directly from the web service description. The web service description is an XML document (see here for an example) which, among other information, contains a section that defines the format, default time and granularity of the time dimension.


If we set the time step to 2 hours and click play, we will see that TimeManager renders each interval by querying the web map service for it, as you can see in this short video.

Querying the web service and waiting for the response takes some time. So, the plugin requires some patience for looking at this particular layer format in interactive mode. If we export the frames, however, we can get a nice result. This is an animation showing hurricane Katrina progressing over a 30 minute interval.


If you want to sponsor further development of the Time Manager plugin, you can arrange a session with me – Karolina Alexiou – via Codementor.

GRASS GIS 7.0.1 released – 32 years of GRASS GIS

What’s new in a nutshellgrass7_logo_500px

This release addresses some minor issues found in the first GRASS GIS 7.0.0 release published earlier this year. The new release provides a series of stability fixes in the core system and the graphical user interface, PyGRASS improvements, some manual enhancements, and a few language translations.

This release is the 32nd birthday release of GRASS GIS.

New in GRASS GIS 7: Its new graphical user interface supports the user in making complex GIS operations as simple as possible. A new Python interface to the C library permits users to create new GRASS GIS-Python modules in a simple way while yet obtaining powerful and fast modules. Furthermore, the libraries were significantly improved for speed and efficiency, along with support for huge files. A lot of effort has been invested to standardize parameter and flag names. Finally, GRASS GIS 7 comes with a series of new modules to analyse raster and vector data, along with a full temporal framework. For a detailed overview, see the list of new features. As a stable release 7.0 enjoys long-term support.

Source code download:

Binaries download:

More details:

See also our detailed announcement: (overview of new stable release series)First time users may explore the first steps tutorial after installation.


The Geographic Resources Analysis Support System (, commonly referred to as GRASS GIS, is an Open Source Geographic Information System providing powerful raster, vector and geospatial processing capabilities in a single integrated software suite. GRASS GIS includes tools for spatial modeling, visualization of raster and vector data, management and analysis of geospatial data, and the processing of satellite and aerial imagery. It also provides the capability to produce sophisticated presentation graphics and hardcopy maps. GRASS GIS has been translated into about twenty languages and supports a huge array of data formats. It can be used either as a stand-alone application or as backend for other software packages such as QGIS and R geostatistics. It is distributed freely under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL). GRASS GIS is a founding member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo).

The GRASS Development Team, July 2015

The post GRASS GIS 7.0.1 released – 32 years of GRASS GIS appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

A Processing model for Tanaka contours

If you follow my blog, you’ve most certainly seen the post How to create illuminated contours, Tanaka-style from earlier this year. As Victor Olaya noted correctly in the comments, the workflow to create this effect lends itself perfectly to being automated with a Processing model.

The model needs only two inputs: the digital elevation model raster and the interval at which we want the contours to be created:

Screenshot 2015-07-05 18.59.34

The model steps are straightforward: the contours are generated and split into short segments before the segment orientation is computed using the following code in the Advanced Python Field Calculator:

p1 = $geom.asPolyline()[0]
p2 = $geom.asPolyline()[-1]
a = p1.azimuth(p2)
if a < 0:
   a += 360
value = a

Screenshot 2015-07-05 18.53.26

You can find the finished model on Github. Happy QGISing!

AGIT & GI_Forum 2015 wrap-up

It’s my pleasure to report back from this year’s AGIT and GI_Forum conference (German and English speaking respectively). It was great to meet the gathered GIS crowd! If you missed it, don’t despair: I’ve compiled a personal summary on Storify, and papers (German, English) and posters are available online. Here’s a pick of my favorite posters:

I also had the pleasure to be involved in multiple presentations this year:

QGIS at the OSGeo Day

As part of the OSGeo Day, I had the chance to present the latest and greatest QGIS features for map design in front of a full house:

Routing with OSM

On a slightly different note, my colleague Markus Straub and I presented an introduction to routing with OpenStreetMap covering which kind of routing-related information is available in OSM as well as a selection of different tools to perform routing on OSM.

Solving the “unnamed link” problem

In this talk, I presented approaches to solving issues with route descriptions that contain unnamed pedestrian or cycle paths.

Here you can find the full open access paper: Graser, A., & Straub, M. (2015). Improving Navigation: Automated Name Extraction for Separately Mapped Pedestrian and Cycle Links. GI_Forum ‒ Journal for Geographic Information Science, 1-2015, 546-556, doi:10.1553/giscience2015s546.

Inferring road popularity from GPS trajectories

In this talk, my colleague Markus Straub presented our new approach to computing how popular a certain road is. The resulting popularity value can be used for planning as well as routing.

Here you can find the full open access paper: Straub, M., & Graser, A. (2015). Learning from Experts: Inferring Road Popularity from GPS Trajectories. GI_Forum ‒ Journal for Geographic Information Science, 1-2015, 41-50, doi:10.1553/giscience2015s41.

QGIS Server powers the new City of Asti WebGIS

A few days ago the new WebGIS of the City of Asti, a 76000 inhabitants city in Piedmont, was launched.  The new WebGIS uses QGIS Server and QGIS Web Client to serve maps and provide street and cadastrial search and location services.

The new WebGIS was developed by ItOpen and is online at:

QGIS 2.10 symbology feature preview

With the release of 2.10 right around the corner, it’s time to have a look at the new features this version of QGIS will bring. One area which has received a lot of development attention is layer styling. In particular, I want to point out the following new features:

1. Graduated symbol size

The graduated renderer has been expanded. Formerly, only color-graduated symbols could be created automatically. Now, it is possible to choose between color and size-graduated styles:

Screenshot 2015-06-21 18.39.25

2. Symbol size assistant

On a similar note, I’m sure you’ll enjoy the size assistant for data-defined size:

Screenshot 2015-06-21 23.16.10 Screenshot 2015-06-21 23.16.01

What’s particularly great about this feature is that it also creates a proper legend for the data-defined sizes:

Screenshot 2015-06-21 23.18.46

3. Interactive class exploration and definition

Another great addition to the graduated renderer dialog is the histogram tab which visualizes the distribution of values as well as the defined class borders. Additionally, the user can interactively change the classes by moving the class borders:

Screenshot 2015-06-21 18.43.09

4. Live layer effects

Since Nyall’s crowd funding initiative for live layer effects was a resounding success, it is now possible to create amazing effects for your vector styles such as shadows, glow, and blur effects:

Screenshot 2015-06-21 18.45.22

I’m very much looking forward to seeing all the new map designs this enables on the QGIS map Flickr group.

Thanks to everyone who was involved in developing and funding these new features!

QField in the wild

QField Experimental is out, after a couple of months of requirements gathering, private early alpha testing and foremost tons of emails requesting access to the testes group we decided today to put the current BETA version in the playstore. This means that from now on you can install QField just like any other android app by using the playstore.

QField app on Google Play
See more ›

QGIS Quick WKT plugin iface edition

Some plugin core functions can now be called from a Python console:

g = QgsGeometry.fromWkt('POINT (9.9 43)')
iface.show_geometry(g.buffer(0.2, 2))
iface.show_wkt('POINT (9 45)')
iface.show_wkb(r'0103...') # cut

All functions accept a layer title as optional argument, if None is given, they are automatically added to a Quick WKT GeometryType (memory) layer, such as Quick WKT Polygon for polygons.

QGIS developer meeting in Nødebo

During the hackfest I’ve been working on the refactoring of the server component, aimed to wrap the server into a class and create python bindings for the new classes. This work is now in the PR queue and brings a first working python test for the server itself.

The server can now be invoked directly from python, like in the example below:


#!/usr/bin/env python
Super simple QgsServer.

from qgis.server import *
from BaseHTTPServer import *

class handler (BaseHTTPRequestHandler):

    server = QgsServer()

    def _doHeaders(self, response):
        l = response.pop(0)
        while l:
            h = l.split(':')
            self.send_header(h[0], ':'.join(h[1:]))
            self.log_message( "send_header %s - %s" % (h[0], ':'.join(h[1:])))
            l = response.pop(0)

    def do_HEAD(self):
        response = str(handler.server.handleRequestGetHeaders(self.path[2:])).split('\n')

    def do_GET(self):
        response = str(handler.server.handleRequest(self.path[2:])).split('\n')
        i = 0

    def do_OPTIONS(s):

httpd = HTTPServer( ('', 8000), handler)

while True:

The python bindings capture the server output instead of printing it on FCGI stdout and allow to pass the request parameters QUERY_STRING directly to the request handler as a string, this makes writing python tests very easy.

QGIS development

We started our GIS development activities back in 2001, focusing on free open-source software, we developed and deployed several WebGis websites using GRASS and UNM MapServer plus PHP MapScript.

After a while, we stared our Python migration by using the GeoDjango Framework and a choice of Javascript mapping libraries for the client, in particular, we developed WebGIS front-ends with OpenLayers and GeoEXT.

QGIS python plugins development

For internal usage we developed two popular QGIS plugins:

both plugins are released with GPL license and are available on the official QGIS Python Plugins repository, source code is available on my GitHub account.

Official QGIS Python Plugins Repository

Back in 2010 we started contributing to the QGIS community by starting the implementation of the new official QGIS Python Plugins repository.

The new repository was developed in Python using the Django framework

We are still maintaining the plugins repository and we actively participate at all QGIS HackFests to share ideas and coordinate the development with the rest of the QGIS team.

QGIS Server and QGIS Web Client

For a medium sized public administration we recently developed a complete WebGIS system for cadastrial and planning data. We choose the amazing QGIS Server as mapping engine and QGIS Web Client for the client side.

During the development of the system we contributed to the code of both components by providing patches and bug fixes and by developing a full stack of PHP support services that are now integrated in the core of QGIS Web Client


QGIS Server Python Plugins Ubuntu Setup


I assume that you are working on a fresh install with Apache and FCGI module installed with:

$ sudo apt-get install apache2 libapache2-mod-fcgid
$ # Enable FCGI daemon apache module
$ sudo a2enmod fcgid

Package installation

First step is to add debian gis repository, add the following repository:

$ cat /etc/apt/sources.list.d/debian-gis.list
deb trusty main
deb-src trusty main

$ # Add keys
$ sudo gpg --recv-key DD45F6C3
$ sudo gpg --export --armor DD45F6C3 | sudo apt-key add -

$ # Update package list
$ sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade

Now install qgis server:

$ sudo apt-get install qgis-server python-qgis

Install the HelloWorld example plugin

This is an example plugin and should not be used in production!
Create a directory to hold server plugins, you can choose whatever path you want, it will be specified in the virtual host configuration and passed on to the server through an environment variable:

$ sudo mkdir -p /opt/qgis-server/plugins
$ cd /opt/qgis-server/plugins
$ sudo wget
$ # In case unzip was not installed before:
$ sudo apt-get install unzip
$ sudo unzip 
$ sudo mv qgis-helloserver-master HelloServer

Apache virtual host configuration

We are installing the server in a separate virtual host listening on port 81.
Rewrite module can be optionally enabled to pass HTTP BASIC auth headers (only needed by the HelloServer example plugin).

$ sudo a2enmod rewrite

Let Apache listen to port 81:

$ cat /etc/apache2/conf-available/qgis-server-port.conf
Listen 81
$ sudo a2enconf qgis-server-port

The virtual host configuration, stored in /etc/apache2/sites-available/001-qgis-server.conf:

<VirtualHost *:81>
    ServerAdmin webmaster@localhost
    DocumentRoot /var/www/html

    ErrorLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/qgis-server-error.log
    CustomLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/qgis-server-access.log combined

    # Longer timeout for WPS... default = 40
    FcgidIOTimeout 120 
    FcgidInitialEnv LC_ALL "en_US.UTF-8"
    FcgidInitialEnv LANG "en_US.UTF-8"
    FcgidInitialEnv QGIS_DEBUG 1
    FcgidInitialEnv QGIS_SERVER_LOG_FILE /tmp/qgis-000.log
    FcgidInitialEnv QGIS_SERVER_LOG_LEVEL 0
    FcgidInitialEnv QGIS_PLUGINPATH "/opt/qgis-server/plugins"

    # ABP: needed for QGIS HelloServer plugin HTTP BASIC auth
    <IfModule mod_fcgid.c>
        RewriteEngine on
        RewriteCond %{HTTP:Authorization} .
        RewriteRule .* - [E=HTTP_AUTHORIZATION:%{HTTP:Authorization}]

    ScriptAlias /cgi-bin/ /usr/lib/cgi-bin/
    <Directory "/usr/lib/cgi-bin">
        AllowOverride All
        Options +ExecCGI -MultiViews +FollowSymLinks
        Require all granted
        #Allow from all

Enable the virtual host and restart Apache:

$ sudo a2ensite 001-qgis-server
$ sudo service apache2 restart


$ wget -q -O - "http://localhost:81/cgi-bin/qgis_mapserv.fcgi?SERVICE=HELLO"

See all QGIS Server related posts

QGIS and QT: getting ready for HiDPI screens


A few months ago I changed my laptop for a Dell M3800 with an amazing 3840×2160 15,6″ display, that means a crazy 282 dpi resolution. I won’t discuss the problems I had to face and resolve to make this thing usable with Kubuntu 14.04 because they are yet some useful resource on the net: The executive summary is that KDE and QT/GTK applications work pretty well and without serious usability problems: Firefox, Chrome, Thunderbird have no problems at all if we exclude some really minor glitches like pixelated or too big icons in a few occasions (see the example below).

Small problem with a big icon in Firefox

Small problem with a big icon in Firefox @ 282 dpi



Unfortunately, QGIS has some serious usability problems on such an high resolution screen and I spent a few hours try to understand how is it possible to fix them and what should be done to avoid them in the first place.

The reason behind is that HiDPI screens usage is increasing and we can expect they’ll gain more and more market share expecially among professional users and GIS users are mostly professional users!

To give you a quick taste of the kind of problems that have to be addressed, take a look at the pictures below.

QGIS statusbar: unreadable on HiDPI

QGIS statusbar: unreadable on HiDPI


Plugin manager rows are too low and left tab column has a 200 px max width


Attribute table rows are too low and icons are too small


I tried to fix some of the issues shown above and this is the resulting commit:, QGIS run on different platforms and I wasn’t able to test it on all of them, I hope the fixes will not cause problems on platforms and screen sizes other than I could test myself.

But the purpose of this notes it to list some humble tips that could be useful to avoid or fix these kind of problem.

Tip #1: Avoid hardcoded pixel values!

Web developers started the fight with HiDPI screens a few years ago, (buzz)words like responsive design and the move towards mobile platforms forced the developers to consider what a pixel really is in a web context, and the obvious conclusion was that a pixel is not a pixel! Please see the following resources if you’re curious and not familiar with these concepts:

The most obvious and efficient solution for the web browser was to change the concept of pixel from a physical to a logical unit.

Unfortunately, at least in QT the pixel is still a physical pixel, this means the we must avoid to specify the size of GUI elements in pixel units.


Qt documentation has a page about Developing Scalable UIs.

This blog page also has some useful tips: HighDPI in KDE Applications.


A collection of useful tips for QT developers can be found in the HiDPI KDE wiki page:

  • Do not use QFont setPixelSize but use setPointSize, and better, avoid setting a custom size at all.
  • Try to stick with the possibilities from KGlobalSettings (KGlobalSettings::generalFont(), KGlobalSettings::largeFont() etc.)
  • Do not use a fixed QSize with images (QPixmap, QIcon…)
  • Do not use KIconLoader::StdSizes. Even though it would sound like a good idea to use it, it suffers from the same issue: Hardcoded pixel sizes.
  • To get a user’s configured icon size, include and use the IconSize function (note: this is not a member function): IconSize(KIconLoader::Small). However, be aware that the user might be able to mess up your apps look by setting some insane values here.
  • If you use svg images for icons (for example in plasma) get the standard sizes from some theme elements (e.g. buttons, fonts) and scale your images accordingly. (Don’t do this when using pixel based images)

Some of the tips above are clearly related to KDE, but I’ve found them still useful to get the overall picture.

Coming to QGIS specific problems, there are still many that have to be resolved, but the overall application is somewhat already useable. The issues I have addressed were easy picks and most of the times it was enough to remove the hardcoded values and rely to QT default sizing mechanisms to get a good result, such as in this case (from src/app/qgisapp.cpp):

//mCoordsLabel->setMaximumHeight( 20 );

Things were harder with plugin manager, the MVC delegate that draws the plugins rows contained a lot of hardcoded metrics for icon and text placement, the solution was to change the values to be relative to the configured font height, see all details in my PR to solve plugin manager HiDPI issues


This is generally a good idea: we must not make any assumption about the size of the fonts the user will be using.

Tip #2: force resize of dialogs

This is something that you should be aware of if you are using an HiDPI screen to build your GUI.

I first encountered this problem when developing my IPyConsole QGIS python plugin: I designed the GUI with designer-qt4 on my HiDPI screen and forget about testing it on “normal” screens, the result is that the window size of the settings dialog (a relatively small dialog) was set by designer at a crazy value of 1115×710. It was impossible from QT Designer to set a small size by dragging the window corner with the mouse: the application automatically reset the dialog size to the calculated minimum size (which on an HiDPI screen was that huge  1115×710).

The solution in that case was to manually alter the Ui_SettingsDialog.ui file to set a small size (say 300×200) and call adjustSize()
# This will adjust the size according to font/dpi:
result = self.settingsDlg.exec_()

Tip #3: Icons

I haven’t yet come to a solution for the right size for icons (suggestions welcome!). Of course the first point is to move all icons to SVG, the process has already started but many icons have still to be converted.

But having scalable icons is not enough: we must make sure that the icon size is not hardcoded in the GUI, there are some settings for icon size in QGIS options dialog and that might be the right point to start but we probably need more than one size:

  • size of toolbar icons
  • size of plugin icons
  • size for smaller toolbars (attribute table, python console vertical sidebar to cite a few)

Maybe a 3-sizes approach would be fine (big, medium, small), for an easy configuration, some pre-defined values for HiDPI / 96dpi and HD screens would be useful.

To get an idea of what the attribute table looks like right now on an HiDPI screen, look at the picture below, scaled to 96dpi:



Icons are too small on an HiDPI screen




There is still much work to do in order to have an usable interface on HiDPI screens, some issues can be easily solved by avoiding hardcoded sizes and leaving to QT the heavy job of calculating GUI widget sizes.

It’s important that developers (not only core developers but plugin developers too) are aware of this kind of issues and how to avoid them in the first place.

HiDPI screens are just around the corner and it’s better to be prepared.


A final note about QT5, it’s not clear to me if and when the move to QT5 will be done and moreover if that move will automatically solve HiDPI issues due to a better HiDPI support, but I’m afraid it won’t.


QGIS and IPython: the definitive interactive console

Whatever is your level of Python knowledge, when you’ll discover the advantages and super-powers of IPython you will never run the default python console again, really: never!

If you’ve never heard about IPython, discover it on IPython official website, don’t get confused by its notebook, graphics and parallel computing capabilities, it also worth if only used as a substitute for the standard Python shell.

I discovered IPython more than 5 years ago and it literally changed my life: I use it also for debugging instead ofpdb, you can embed an IPython console in your code with:

from IPython import embed; embed()

TAB completion with full introspection

What I like the most in IPython is its TAB completion features, it’s not just like normal text matching while you type but it has full realtime introspection, you only see what you have access to, being it a method of an instance or a class or a property, a module, a submodule or whatever you might think of: it even works when you’re importing something or you are typing a path like in open('/home/.....

Its TAB completion is so powerful that you can even use shell commands from within the IPython interpreter!

Full documentation is just a question mark away

Just type “?” after a method of function to print its docstring or its signature in case of SIP bindings.

Lot of special functions

IPython special functions are available for history, paste, run, include and many more topics, they are prefixed with “%” and self-documented in the shell.

All that sounds great! But what has to do with QGIS?

I personally find the QGIS python console lacks some important features, expecially with the autocompletion (autosuggest). What’s the purpose of having autocompletion when most of the times you just get a traceback because the method the autocompleter proposed you is that of another class? My brain is too small and too old to keep the whole API docs in my mind, autocompletion is useful when it’s intelligent enough to tell between methods and properties of the instance/class on which you’re operating.

Another problem is that the API is very far from being “pythonic” (this isn’t anyone’s fault, it’s just how SIP works), here’s an example (suppose we want the SRID of the first layer):

# TAB completion stops working here^

TAB completion stop working at the first parenthesis :(

What if all those getter would be properties?

registry = core.QgsMapLayerRegistry.instance()
# With a couple of TABs without having to remember any method or function name!
[<qgis._core.QgsRasterLayer at 0x7f07dff8e2b0>,
 <qgis._core.QgsRasterLayer at 0x7f07dff8ef28>,
 <qgis._core.QgsVectorLayer at 0x7f07dff48c30>,
 <qgis._core.QgsVectorLayer at 0x7f07dff8e478>,
 <qgis._core.QgsVectorLayer at 0x7f07dff489d0>,
 <qgis._core.QgsVectorLayer at 0x7f07dff48770>]

layer = registry.p_mapLayers.values()[0]

layer.p_c ---> TAB!
layer.p_cacheImage            layer.p_children       layer.p_connect       
layer.p_capabilitiesString    layer.p_commitChanges  layer.p_crs           
layer.p_changeAttributeValue  layer.p_commitErrors   layer.p_customProperty

layer.p_crs.p_ ---> TAB!
layer.p_crs.p_authid               layer.p_crs.p_postgisSrid      
layer.p_crs.p_axisInverted         layer.p_crs.p_projectionAcronym
layer.p_crs.p_description          layer.p_crs.p_recentProjections
layer.p_crs.p_ellipsoidAcronym     layer.p_crs.p_srsid            
layer.p_crs.p_findMatchingProj     layer.p_crs.p_syncDb           
layer.p_crs.p_geographicCRSAuthId  layer.p_crs.p_toProj4          
layer.p_crs.p_geographicFlag       layer.p_crs.p_toWkt            
layer.p_crs.p_isValid              layer.p_crs.p_validationHint   

Out[]: u'EPSG:4326'

This works with a quick and dirty hack: propertize that adds a p_... property to all methods in a module or in a class that

  1. do return something
  2. do not take any argument (except self)

this leaves the original methods untouched (in case they were overloaded!) still allowing full introspection and TAB completion with a pythonic interface.

A few methods are still not working with propertize, so far singleton methods like instance() are not passing unit tests.

IPyConsole: a QGIS IPython plugin

If you’ve been reading up to this point you probably can’t wait to start using IPython inside your beloved QGIS (if that’s not the case, please keep reading the previous paragraphs carefully until your appetite is grown!).

An experimental plugin that brings the magic of IPython to QGIS is now available:
Download IPyConsole


Please start exploring QGIS objects and classes and give me some feedback!


IPyConsole QGIS plugin

Installation notes

You basically need only a working IPython installation, IPython is available for all major platforms and distributions, please refer to the official documentation.


QGIS Server: GetFeatureInfo with STYLE

There have been some requests in the past about custom CSS for html GetFeatureInfo responses from QGIS Server.

Currently, the HTML response template is hardcoded and there is no way to customize it, the Python plugin support introduced with the latest version of QGIS Server provides an easy way to add some custom CSS rules or even provide custom templates.

To get you started, I’ve added a new filter to my example  HelloServer plugin:

import os

from qgis.server import *
from qgis.core import *
from PyQt4.QtCore import *
from PyQt4.QtGui import *

class GetFeatureInfoCSSFilter(QgsServerFilter):

    def __init__(self, serverIface):
        super(GetFeatureInfoCSSFilter, self).__init__(serverIface)

    def requestReady(self):
        """Nothing to do here, but it would be the ideal point
        to alter request **before** it gets processed, for example
        you could set INFO_FORMAT to text/xml to get XML instead of
        HTML in responseComplete"""

    def responseComplete(self):
        request = self.serverInterface().requestHandler()
        params = request.parameterMap( )
        if (params.get('SERVICE').upper() == 'WMS' \
                and params.get('REQUEST', '').upper() == 'GETFEATUREINFO' \
                and params.get('INFO_FORMAT', '').upper() == 'TEXT/HTML' \
                and not request.exceptionRaised() ):
            body = request.body()
            body.replace('<BODY>', """<BODY><STYLE type="text/css">* {font-family: arial, sans-serif; color: blue;}</STYLE>""")
            # Set the body

This filter is pretty simple, if the request is a WMS GetFeatureInfo with HTML format, it injects a STYLE tag into the HTML HEAD.

Here is the output with blue color and arial fonts applied:

getfeatureinfo styled response

As an exercise left to the reader, you can also intercept the call in requestReady(self), change the INFO_FORMAT to text/xml and then do some real templating, for example by using XSLT or by parsing the XML and injecting the values into a custom template.

QGIS Web Client GetFeatureInfo formatters

The transformation of a value to an URL address is done automatically in a few cases (this feature is currently undocumented): for example when the column value starts with http or https or a string contained in mediaurl parameter defined in Globaloptions.js.
But if you want more, then you need a real formatting function that given the value (and maybe some more information bits about where the values comes from) returns a properly formatted hyperlink or whatever else you need.

This new feature is currently available in my customformatters branch, and an example formatter is provided in Globaloptions.js and implemented for the helloworld.qgs sample project.

Here is how it works:

// Custom WMS GetFeatureInfo results formatters: you can define custom
// filter functions to apply custom formatting to values coming from
// GetFeatureInfo requests when the user use the "identify" tool.
// The same formatting functions can be normally also used as "renderer"
// function passed to column configuration in the "gridColumns" property
// of the grid configuration of the WMS GetFeatureInfo search panels.

// Example formatter, takes the value, the column name and the layer name,
// normally only the first parameter is used.
function customURLFormatter(attValue, attName, layerName){
    return '<a href="' + encodeURI(attValue) + '" target="_blank">' + attValue + '</a>';

// Formatters configuration
var getFeatureInfoCustomFormatters = {
    'Country': { // Layer name
        'name': customURLFormatter // Can be an array if you need multiple formatters

If you also want to apply the same formatting to result grids coming from the search panels, you can use the very same functions passing the function in the renderer attribute of the datagrid, as shown around line 18 in the following snippet:

var simpleWmsSearch = {
  title: "Search continent",
  query: 'simpleWmsSearch',
  useWmsRequest: true,
  queryLayer: "Country",
  formItems: [
      xtype: 'textfield',
      name: 'name',
      fieldLabel: "Name",
      allowBlank: false,
      blankText: "Please enter a name (e.g. 'africa')",
      filterOp: "="
  gridColumns: [
    // Apply the formatter as the "renderer"
    {header: 'Name', dataIndex: 'name', menuDisabled: 'true', renderer: customURLFormatter}
//  highlightFeature: true,
//  highlightLabel: 'name',
  selectionLayer: 'Country',
  selectionZoom: 0,
  doZoomToExtent: true

The result of the formatter applied to both views is in the following picture:

Qgis Web Client Formatters

  • Page 1 of 9 ( 162 posts )
  • >>
  • gis

Back to Top