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Sat Dec 16 01:20:16 2017

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QGIS Planet

Drive-time Isochrones from a single Shapefile using QGIS, PostGIS, and Pgrouting

This is a guest post by Chris Kohler .

Introduction:

This guide provides step-by-step instructions to produce drive-time isochrones using a single vector shapefile. The method described here involves building a routing network using a single vector shapefile of your roads data within a Virtual Box. Furthermore, the network is built by creating start and end nodes (source and target nodes) on each road segment. We will use Postgresql, with PostGIS and Pgrouting extensions, as our database. Please consider this type of routing to be fair, regarding accuracy, as the routing algorithms are based off the nodes locations and not specific addresses. I am currently working on an improved workflow to have site address points serve as nodes to optimize results. One of the many benefits of this workflow is no financial cost to produce (outside collecting your roads data). I will provide instructions for creating, and using your virtual machine within this guide.

Steps:–Getting Virtual Box(begin)–

Intro 1. Download/Install Oracle VM(https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads)

Intro 2. Start the download/install OSGeo-Live 11(https://live.osgeo.org/en/overview/overview.html).

Pictures used in this workflow will show 10.5, though version 11 can be applied similarly. Make sure you download the version: osgeo-live-11-amd64.iso. If you have trouble finding it, here is the direct link to the download (https://sourceforge.net/projects/osgeo-live/files/10.5/osgeo-live-10.5-amd64.iso/download)
Intro 3. Ready for virtual machine creation: We will utilize the downloaded OSGeo-Live 11 suite with a virtual machine we create to begin our workflow. The steps to create your virtual machine are listed below. Also, here are steps from an earlier workshop with additional details with setting up your virtual machine with osgeo live(http://workshop.pgrouting.org/2.2.10/en/chapters/installation.html).

1.  Create Virutal Machine: In this step we begin creating the virtual machine housing our database.

Open Oracle VM VirtualBox Manager and select “New” located at the top left of the window.

VBstep1

Then fill out name, operating system, memory, etc. to create your first VM.

vbstep1.2

2. Add IDE Controller:  The purpose of this step is to create a placeholder for the osgeo 11 suite to be implemented. In the virtual box main window, right-click your newly-created vm and open the settings.

vbstep2

In the settings window, on the left side select the storage tab.

Find “adds new storage controller button located at the bottom of the tab. Be careful of other buttons labeled “adds new storage attachment”! Select “adds new storage controller button and a drop-down menu will appear. From the top of the drop-down select “Add IDE Controller”.

vbstep2.2

vbstep2.3

You will see a new item appear in the center of the window under the “Storage Tree”.

3.  Add Optical Drive: The osgeo 11 suite will be implemented into the virtual machine via an optical drive. Highlight the new controller IDE you created and select “add optical drive”.

vbstep3

A new window will pop-up and select “Choose Disk”.

vbstep3.2

Locate your downloaded file “osgeo-live 11 amd64.iso” and click open. A new object should appear in the middle window under your new controller displaying “osgeo-live-11.0-amd64.iso”.

vbstep3.3

Finally your virtual machine is ready for use.
Start your new Virtual Box, then wait and follow the onscreen prompts to begin using your virtual machine.

vbstep3.4

–Getting Virtual Box(end)—

4. Creating the routing database, and both extensions (postgis, pgrouting): The database we create and both extensions we add will provide the functions capable of producing isochrones.

To begin, start by opening the command line tool (hold control+left-alt+T) then log in to postgresql by typing “psql -U user;” into the command line and then press Enter. For the purpose of clear instruction I will refer to database name in this guide as “routing”, feel free to choose your own database name. Please input the command, seen in the figure below, to create the database:

CREATE DATABASE routing;

You can use “\c routing” to connect to the database after creation.

step4

The next step after creating and connecting to your new database is to create both extensions. I find it easier to take two-birds-with-one-stone typing “psql -U user routing;” this will simultaneously log you into postgresql and your routing database.

When your logged into your database, apply the commands below to add both extensions

CREATE EXTENSION postgis;
CREATE EXTENSION pgrouting;

step4.2

step4.3

5. Load shapefile to database: In this next step, the shapefile of your roads data must be placed into your virtual machine and further into your database.

My method is using email to send myself the roads shapefile then download and copy it from within my virtual machines web browser. From the desktop of your Virtual Machine, open the folder named “Databases” and select the application “shape2pgsql”.

step5

Follow the UI of shp2pgsql to connect to your routing database you created in Step 4.

step5.2

Next, select “Add File” and find your roads shapefile (in this guide we will call our shapefile “roads_table”) you want to use for your isochrones and click Open.

step5.3

Finally, click “Import” to place your shapefile into your routing database.

6. Add source & target columns: The purpose of this step is to create columns which will serve as placeholders for our nodes data we create later.

There are multiple ways to add these columns into the roads_table. The most important part of this step is which table you choose to edit, the names of the columns you create, and the format of the columns. Take time to ensure the source & target columns are integer format. Below are the commands used in your command line for these functions.

ALTER TABLE roads_table ADD COLUMN "source" integer;
ALTER TABLE roads_table ADD COLUMN "target" integer;

step6

step6.2

7. Create topology: Next, we will use a function to attach a node to each end of every road segment in the roads_table. The function in this step will create these nodes. These newly-created nodes will be stored in the source and target columns we created earlier in step 6.

As well as creating nodes, this function will also create a new table which will contain all these nodes. The suffix “_vertices_pgr” is added to the name of your shapefile to create this new table. For example, using our guide’s shapefile name , “roads_table”, the nodes table will be named accordingly: roads_table_vertices_pgr. However, we will not use the new table created from this function (roads_table_vertices_pgr). Below is the function, and a second simplified version, to be used in the command line for populating our source and target columns, in other words creating our network topology. Note the input format, the “geom” column in my case was called “the_geom” within my shapefile:

pgr_createTopology('roads_table', 0.001, 'geom', 'id',
 'source', 'target', rows_where := 'true', clean := f)

step7

Here is a direct link for more information on this function: http://docs.pgrouting.org/2.3/en/src/topology/doc/pgr_createTopology.html#pgr-create-topology

Below is an example(simplified) function for my roads shapefile:

SELECT pgr_createTopology('roads_table', 0.001, 'the_geom', 'id')

8. Create a second nodes table: A second nodes table will be created for later use. This second node table will contain the node data generated from pgr_createtopology function and be named “node”. Below is the command function for this process. Fill in your appropriate source and target fields following the manner seen in the command below, as well as your shapefile name.

To begin, find the folder on the Virtual Machines desktop named “Databases” and open the program “pgAdmin lll” located within.

step8

Connect to your routing database in pgAdmin window. Then highlight your routing database, and find “SQL” tool at the top of the pgAdmin window. The tool resembles a small magnifying glass.

step8.2

We input the below function into the SQL window of pgAdmin. Feel free to refer to this link for further information: (https://anitagraser.com/2011/02/07/a-beginners-guide-to-pgrouting/)

CREATE TABLE node AS
   SELECT row_number() OVER (ORDER BY foo.p)::integer AS id,
          foo.p AS the_geom
   FROM (     
      SELECT DISTINCT roads_table.source AS p FROM roads_table
      UNION
      SELECT DISTINCT roads_table.target AS p FROM roads_table
   ) foo
   GROUP BY foo.p;

step8.3

  1.  Create a routable network: After creating the second node table from step 8,  we will combine this node table(node) with our shapefile(roads_table) into one, new, table(network) that will be used as the routing network. This table will be called “network” and will be capable of processing routing queries.  Please input this command and execute in SQL pgAdmin tool as we did in step 8. Here is a reference for more information:(https://anitagraser.com/2011/02/07/a-beginners-guide-to-pgrouting/)   

step8.2

 

CREATE TABLE network AS
   SELECT a.*, b.id as start_id, c.id as end_id
   FROM roads_table AS a
      JOIN node AS b ON a.source = b.the_geom
      JOIN node AS c ON a.target = c.the_geom;

step9.2

10. Create a “noded” view of the network:  This new view will later be used to calculate the visual isochrones in later steps. Input this command and execute in SQL pgAdmin tool.

CREATE OR REPLACE VIEW network_nodes AS 
SELECT foo.id,
 st_centroid(st_collect(foo.pt)) AS geom 
FROM ( 
  SELECT network.source AS id,
         st_geometryn (st_multi(network.geom),1) AS pt 
  FROM network
  UNION 
  SELECT network.target AS id, 
         st_boundary(st_multi(network.geom)) AS pt 
  FROM network) foo 
GROUP BY foo.id;

step10

11.​ Add column for speed:​ This step may, or may not, apply if your original shapefile contained a field of values for road speeds.

In reality a network of roads will typically contain multiple speed limits. The shapefile you choose may have a speed field, otherwise the discrimination for the following steps will not allow varying speeds to be applied to your routing network respectfully.

If values of speed exists in your shapefile we will implement these values into a new field, “traveltime“, that will show rate of travel for every road segment in our network based off their geometry. Firstly, we will need to create a column to store individual traveling speeds. The name of our column will be “traveltime” using the format: ​double precision.​ Input this command and execute in the command line tool as seen below.

ALTER TABLE network ADD COLUMN traveltime double precision;

step11

Next, we will populate the new column “traveltime” by calculating traveling speeds using an equation. This equation will take each road segments geometry(shape_leng) and divide by the rate of travel(either mph or kph). The sample command I’m using below utilizes mph as the rate while our geometry(shape_leng) units for my roads_table is in feet​. If you are using either mph or kph, input this command and execute in SQL pgAdmin tool. Below further details explain the variable “X”.

UPDATE network SET traveltime = shape_leng / X*60

step11.2

How to find X​, ​here is an example​: Using example 30 mph as rate. To find X, we convert 30 miles to feet, we know 5280 ft = 1 mile, so we multiply 30 by 5280 and this gives us 158400 ft. Our rate has been converted from 30 miles per hour to 158400 feet per hour. For a rate of 30 mph, our equation for the field “traveltime”  equates to “shape_leng / 158400*60″. To discriminate this calculations output, we will insert additional details such as “where speed = 30;”. What this additional detail does is apply our calculated output to features with a “30” value in our “speed” field. Note: your “speed” field may be named differently.

UPDATE network SET traveltime = shape_leng / 158400*60 where speed = 30;

Repeat this step for each speed value in your shapefile examples:

UPDATE network SET traveltime = shape_leng / X*60 where speed = 45;
UPDATE network SET traveltime = shape_leng / X*60 where speed = 55;

The back end is done. Great Job!

Our next step will be visualizing our data in QGIS. Open and connect QGIS to your routing database by right-clicking “PostGIS” in the Browser Panel within QGIS main window. Confirm the checkbox “Also list tables with no geometry” is checked to allow you to see the interior of your database more clearly. Fill out the name or your routing database and click “OK”.

If done correctly, from QGIS you will have access to tables and views created in your routing database. Feel free to visualize your network by drag-and-drop the network table into your QGIS Layers Panel. From here you can use the identify tool to select each road segment, and see the source and target nodes contained within that road segment. The node you choose will be used in the next step to create the views of drive-time.

12.Create views​: In this step, we create views from a function designed to determine the travel time cost. Transforming these views with tools will visualize the travel time costs as isochrones.

The command below will be how you start querying your database to create drive-time isochrones. Begin in QGIS by draging your network table into the contents. The visual will show your network as vector(lines). Simply select the road segment closest to your point of interest you would like to build your isochrone around. Then identify the road segment using the identify tool and locate the source and target fields.

step12

step12.2

Place the source or target field value in the below command where you see ​VALUE​, in all caps​.

This will serve you now as an isochrone catchment function for this workflow. Please feel free to use this command repeatedly for creating new isochrones by substituting the source value. Please input this command and execute in SQL pgAdmin tool.

*AT THE BOTTOM OF THIS WORKFLOW I PROVIDED AN EXAMPLE USING SOURCE VALUE “2022”

CREATE OR REPLACE VIEW "​view_name" AS 
SELECT di.seq, 
       di.id1, 
       di.id2, 
       di.cost, 
       pt.id, 
       pt.geom 
FROM pgr_drivingdistance('SELECT
     gid::integer AS id, 
     Source::integer AS source, 
     Target::integer AS target,                                    
     Traveltime::double precision AS cost 
       FROM network'::text, ​VALUE::bigint, 
    100000::double precision, false, false)
    di(seq, id1, id2, cost)
JOIN network_nodes pt ON di.id1 = pt.id;

step12.3

13.Visualize Isochrone: Applying tools to the view will allow us to adjust the visual aspect to a more suitable isochrone overlay.

​After creating your view, a new item in your routing database is created, using the “view_name” you chose. Drag-and-drop this item into your QGIS LayersPanel. You will see lots of small dots which represent the nodes.

In the figure below, I named my view “take1“.

step13

Each node you see contains a drive-time value, “cost”, which represents the time used to travel from the node you input in step 12’s function.

step13.2

Start by installing the QGIS plug-in Interpolation” by opening the Plugin Manager in QGIS interface.

step13.3

Next, at the top of QGIS window select “Raster” and a drop-down will appear, select “Interpolation”.

step13.4

 

A new window pops up and asks you for input.

step13.5

Select your “​view”​ as the​ vector layer​, select ​”cost​” as your ​interpolation attribute​, and then click “Add”.

step13.6

A new vector layer will show up in the bottom of the window, take care the type is Points. For output, on the other half of the window, keep the interpolation method as “TIN”, edit the ​output file​ location and name. Check the box “​Add result to project​”.

Note: decreasing the cellsize of X and Y will increase the resolution but at the cost of performance.

Click “OK” on the bottom right of the window.

step13.7

A black and white raster will appear in QGIS, also in the Layers Panel a new item was created.

step13.8

Take some time to visualize the raster by coloring and adjusting values in symbology until you are comfortable with the look.

step13.9

step13.10

14. ​Create contours of our isochrone:​ Contours can be calculated from the isochrone as well.

Find near the top of QGIS window, open the “Raster” menu drop-down and select Extraction → Contour.

step14

Fill out the appropriate interval between contour lines but leave the check box “Attribute name” unchecked. Click “OK”.

step14.2

step14.3

15.​ Zip and Share:​ Find where you saved your TIN and contours, compress them in a zip folder by highlighting them both and right-click to select “compress”. Email the compressed folder to yourself to export out of your virtual machine.

Example Isochrone catchment for this workflow:

CREATE OR REPLACE VIEW "2022" AS 
SELECT di.seq, Di.id1, Di.id2, Di.cost,                           
       Pt.id, Pt.geom 
FROM pgr_drivingdistance('SELECT gid::integer AS id,                                       
     Source::integer AS source, Target::integer AS target, 
     Traveltime::double precision AS cost FROM network'::text, 
     2022::bigint, 100000::double precision, false, false) 
   di(seq, id1, id2, cost) 
JOIN netowrk_nodes pt 
ON di.id1 = pt.id;

References: Virtual Box ORACLE VM, OSGeo-Live 11  amd64 iso, Workshop FOSS4G Bonn(​http://workshop.pgrouting.org/2.2.10/en/index.html​),


Public transport isochrones with pgRouting

This post covers a simple approach to calculating isochrones in a public transport network using pgRouting and QGIS.

For this example, I’m using the public transport network of Vienna which is loaded into a pgRouting-enable database as network.publictransport. To create the routable network run:

select pgr_createTopology('network.publictransport', 0.0005, 'geom', 'id');

Note that the tolerance parameter 0.0005 (units are degrees) controls how far link start and end points can be apart and still be considered as the same topological network node.

To create a view with the network nodes run:

create or replace view network.publictransport_nodes as
select id, st_centroid(st_collect(pt)) as geom
from (
	(select source as id, st_startpoint(geom) as pt
	from network.publictransport
	) 
union
	(select target as id, st_endpoint(geom) as pt
	from network.publictransport
	) 
) as foo
group by id;

To calculate isochrones, we need a cost attribute for our network links. To calculate travel times for each link, I used speed averages: 15 km/h for buses and trams and 32km/h for metro lines (similar to data published by the city of Vienna).

alter table network.publictransport add column length_m integer;
update network.publictransport set length_m = st_length(st_transform(geom,31287));

alter table network.publictransport add column traveltime_min double precision;
update network.publictransport set traveltime_min = length_m  / 15000.0 * 60; -- average is 15 km/h
update network.publictransport set traveltime_min = length_m  / 32000.0 * 60 where "LTYP" = '4'; -- average metro is 32 km/h

That’s all the preparations we need. Next, we can already calculate our isochrone data using pgr_drivingdistance, e.g. for network node #1:

create or replace view network.temp as
 SELECT seq, id1 AS node, id2 AS edge, cost, geom
  FROM pgr_drivingdistance(
    'SELECT id, source, target, traveltime_min as cost FROM network.publictransport',
    1, 100000, false, false
  ) as di
  JOIN network.publictransport_nodes pt
  ON di.id1 = pt.id;

The resulting view contains all network nodes which are reachable within 100,000 cost units (which are minutes in our case).

Let’s load the view into QGIS to visualize the isochrones:

isochrone_publictransport_1

The trick is to use data-defined size to calculate the different walking circles around the public transport stops. For example, we can set up 10 minute isochrones which take into account how much time was used to travel by pubic transport and show how far we can get by walking in the time that is left:

1. We want to scale the circle radius to reflect the remaining time left to walk. Therefore, enable Scale diameter in Advanced | Size scale field:

scale_diameter

2. In the Simple marker properties change size units to Map units.
3. Go to data defined properties to set up the dynamic circle size.

datadefined_size

The expression makes sure that only nodes reachable within 10 minutes are displayed. Then it calculates the remaining time (10-"cost") and assumes that we can walk 100 meters per minute which is left. It additionally multiplies by 2 since we are scaling the diameter instead of the radius.

To calculate isochrones for different start nodes, we simply update the definition of the view network.temp.

While this approach certainly has it’s limitations, it’s a good place to start learning how to create isochrones. A better solution should take into account that it takes time to change between different lines. While preparing the network, more care should to be taken to ensure that possible exchange nodes are modeled correctly. Some network links might only be usable in one direction. Not to mention that there are time tables which could be accounted for ;)


pgRouting 2.0 for Windows quick guide

This post is a quick instruction for installing Postgres 9.2, PostGIS 2.0 and pgRouting 2.0.

  1. For Postgres, download the installer from enterprisedb.com.
  2. Run the installer. You’ll have to pick a superuser password – remember it, you’ll need it again soon.
  3. At the end of the installation process, allow the installer to start Stack Builder.
  4. In Stack Builder, select the Postgres 9.2 installation and install PostGIS from the list of available extensions.
  5. The PostGIS installation procedure will prompt you for the superuser password you picked before.
  6. I suggest letting the installer create a sample database We’ll need it later anyway.

Now for the pgRouting part:

  1. Download the pgRouting zip file for your system (32 or 64 bit) from Winnie.
  2. Unzip the file. It contains bin, lib and share folders as well as two text files.
  3. Copy these folders and files over to your Postgres installation. In my case C:\Program Files\PostgreSQL\9.2

Installation – done.

Next, fire up pgAdmin. If you allowed the PostGIS installer to create a sample database, you will find it named postgis20 or similar. Otherwise just create a new database using the PostGIS template database. You can enable pgRouting in a database using the following steps:

  1. In postgis20, execute the following query to create the pgrouting extension. This will add the pgRouting-specific functions:
    CREATE EXTENSION pgrouting;
  2. Test if everything worked fine:
    SELECT pgr_version();

    It should return "(2.0.0-dev,v2.0.0-beta,18,a3be38b,develop,1.46.1)" or similar – depending on the version you downloaded.

pgadmin_pgrouting

How about some test data? I’ll be using the public transport network of the city of Vienna provided in GeoJSON format from http://data.wien.gv.at/daten/wfs?service=WFS&request=GetFeature&version=1.1.0&typeName=ogdwien:OEFFLINIENOGD&srsName=EPSG:4326&outputFormat=json:

  1. Just copy paste the url in Add Vector Layer | Protocol to load the dataset.
  2. Use DB Manager to load the layer into your database. (As you can see in the screenshot, I created a schema called network but that’s optional.)
  3. import_publictransport

  4. To make the line vector table routable, we use pgr_createTopology. This function assumes the columsn called “source” and “target” exist so we have to create those as well:
    alter table network.publictransport add column source integer;
    alter table network.publictransport add column target integer;
    select pgr_createTopology('network.publictransport', 0.0001, 'geom', 'id');
    

    I’m quite generously using a tolerance of 0.0001 degrees to build the topology. Depending on your dataset, you might want to be more strict here.

  5. Let’s test it! Route from source #1 to target #3000 using pgr_dijkstra:
    SELECT seq, id1 AS node, id2 AS edge, cost, geom
      FROM pgr_dijkstra(
        'SELECT id, source, target, st_length(geom) as cost FROM network.publictransport',
        1, 3000, false, false
      ) as di
      JOIN network.publictransport pt
      ON di.id2 = pt.id ;

    Note how the query joins the routing results and the network table together. (I’m aware that using the link length as a cost attribute will not lead to realistic results in a public transport network but bear with me for this example.)

  6. We can immediately see the routing results using the Load as new layer option:

select_dijkstra
route

Nice work! pgRouting 2.0 has come a long way. In a post from April this year, Boston GIS even announced to add pgRouting into the Stack Builder. That’s going to make the installation even more smooth.


Osm2po Part 2 – PgRouting on OSM the Easy Way

This is the follow up post to “An osm2po Quickstart” which covers loading the OSM network into PostGIS and using the result with pgRouting. After parsing the OSM file, e.g.

C:\Users\Anita\temp\osm2po-4.2.30>java -jar osm2po-core-4.2.30-signed.jar prefix=at "C:\Users\Anita\Geodaten\OpenStreetMap Data\austria.osm.pbf"

you should find a folder with the name of the prefix you chose inside the osm2po folder. It contains a log file which in turn provides a command line template for importing the OSM network into PostGIS, e.g.

INFO commandline template: psql -U [username] -d [dbname] -q -f "C:\Users\Anita\temp\osm2po-4.2.30\at\at_2po_4pgr.sql"

Using this template, we can easily import the .sql file into an exiting database. My pgRouting-enabled database is called wien_ogd.

C:\Users\Anita\temp\osm2po-4.2.30\at>psql -U [username] -d wien_ogd -q -f C:\Users\Anita\temp\osm2po-4.2.30\at\at_2po_4pgr.sql

Now, the data is ready for usage in QGIS:

The osm2po table in QGIS

Using “pgRouting Layer” plugin, it’s now straightforward to calculate shortest paths. I had to apply some changes to the plugin code, so please get the latest version from Github.

A shortest path in osm2po network

Using osm2po turned out to be far less painful than I expected and I hope you’ll find this post useful too.


A First Glimpse at pgRouting Layer for QGIS

PgRouting is great. But (Yes, there is always a “but”.) those queries are not easy to remember. That’s why I started work on a pgRouting GUI today. It’s actually a QGIS plugin which I’ll call “pgRouting Layer” and it is based on Pablo T. Carreira’s “Fast SQL Layer” plugin which can execute arbitrary SQL statements against a PostGIS or SpatiaLite database and add the results in a map layer.

This first prototype supports pgRouting’s shortest_path() function as described in “A Beginners Guide to pgRouting”. Once supplied with the necessary information about attribute field names, the plugin allows you to route between pairs of nodes. For convenience, the resulting layer is named after its start and end node.

some shortest paths using "pgRouting Layer" plugin

Besides normal routing capabilities, I’d like to develop this plugin towards a user friendly tool for catchment zone analysis. If you are interested in teaming up to work towards this goal, let me know.


A Look at PgRouting find_ node_by_nearest_link_within_distance

The function with the glorious name “find_node_by_nearest_link_within_distance” is part of pgRouting and can be found in matching.sql.

“This function finds nearest node as a source or target of the nearest link”
That means that we can use this function e.g. to find the best road network node for a given address.

The function returns an object of type link_point:

CREATE TYPE link_point AS (id integer, name varchar);

To access only the id value of the nearest node, you can use:

SELECT id(foo.x) 
FROM (
   SELECT find_node_by_nearest_link_within_distance(
	'POINT(14.111 47.911)',
	0.5,
	'nw_table')::link_point as x
) AS foo


A Closer Look at Alpha Shapes in pgRouting

Alpha shapes are generalizations of the convex hull [1]. Convex hulls are well known and widely implemented in GIS systems. Alpha shapes are different in that they capture the shape of a point set. You can watch a great demo of how alpha shapes work on François Bélair’s website “Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Alpha Shapes But Were Afraid to Ask” I borrowed the following pictures from that site:

Alpha shapes for different values of alpha. The left one equals the convex hull of the point set. The right picture represents the alpha shape for a smaller value of alpha

pgRouting comes with an implementation of alpha shapes. There is an alpha shape function: alphashape(sql text) and a convenience wrapper: points_as_polygon(query character varying). The weird thing is that you don’t get to set an alpha value. The only thing supplied to the function is a set of points. Let’s see what kind of results it produces!

Starting point for this experiment is a 10 km catchment zone around node #2699 in my osm road network. Travel costs to nodes are calculated using driving_distance() function. (You can find more information on using this function in Catchment Areas with pgRouting driving_distance().)

CREATE TABLE home_catchment10km AS
SELECT *
   FROM osm_nodes
   JOIN
   (SELECT * FROM driving_distance('
      SELECT gid AS id,
          source,
          target,
          meters AS cost
      FROM osm_roads',
      2699,
      10000,
      false,
      false)) AS route
   ON
   osm_nodes.id = route.vertex_id

After costs are calculated, we can create some alpha shapes. The following queries create the table and insert an alpha shape for all points with a cost of less than 1500:

CREATE TABLE home_isodist (id serial, max_cost double precision);
SELECT AddGeometryColumn('home_isodist','the_geom',4326,'POLYGON',2);

INSERT INTO home_isodist (max_cost, the_geom) (
SELECT 1500, ST_SetSRID(the_geom,4326)
FROM 
  points_as_polygon(
    'SELECT id, ST_X(the_geom) AS x, ST_Y(the_geom) AS y FROM home_catchment10km where cost < 1500'));

In previous posts, I’ve created catchment areas by first interpolating a cost raster and creating contours from there. Now, let’s see how the two different approaches compare!

The following picture shows resulting catchment areas for 500, 1000, 1500, and 2000 meters around a central node. Colored areas show the form of pgRouting alpha shape results. Black contours show the results of the interpolation method:

Comparison of pgRouting alpha shapes and interpolation method

At first glance, results look similar enough. Alpha shape results look like a generalized version of interpolation results. I guess that it would be possible to get even closer if the alpha value could be set to a smaller value. The function should then produce a finer, more detailed polygon.

For a general overview about which areas of a network are reachable within certain costs, pgRouting alpha shapes function seems a viable alternative to the interpolation method presented in previous posts. However, the alpha value used by pgRouting seems too big to produce detailed catchment areas.

[1] http://biogeometry.duke.edu/software/alphashapes/


Infrastructure Coverage based on Open Data

This is something I have been wanting to do for a long time: map which areas of Vienna have fast access to a certain kind of infrastructure. Now, I finally found time and data to perform this analysis. Data used is OSM road data (Cloudmade shapefile) for Austria and metro station coordinates for Vienna by Max Kossatz and Robert Harm.

Before importing the OSM roads into PostGIS, I cut out my area of interest and created a clean topology using GRASS v.clean.break. Once loaded into the database, assign_vertex_id() function does the rest and the network is ready for routing and distance calculations.
For the metro stations, I calculated the nearest network node using George MacKerron’s Nearest Neighbor function.

Catchments were calculated using driving_distance() function. It returns distance to a given metro station for all network nodes (up to a maximum distance). The result can be interpolated to show e.g. which areas are at most 1 km away from any metro station.

1 km catchments around metro stations in Vienna

Close-up look at the 1 km catchment zone border

Once set up, performing this analysis is reasonably fast. Instead of metro stations, any other infrastructure coverage can be analyzed easily. I could imagine this being really useful when looking for a new flat: “Find me an area close to work, a metro station and a highschool.”

The next great thing would be to have all data for calculation of transit travel times too. Yes, I’m looking at you Wiener Linien!


Catchment Areas with pgRouting driving_distance()

In a previous post, I’ve described how to create catchment areas with pgRouting shortest_path() function. The solution described there calculates costs from the starting node (aka vertex) to all other nodes in the network. Depending on the network size, this can take a long time. Especially, if you are only interested in relatively small catchment areas (e.g. 50 km around a node in a network covering 10,000 km) there is a lot of unnecessary calculation going on. This is where you might want to use driving_distance() instead.

Driving_distance() offers a parameter for maximum distance/cost and will stop calculations when the costs exceed this limit. But let’s start at the beginning: installing the necessary functions.

Installation

If you have followed my guide to installing pgRouting, you already have some routing functions installed – but not driving_distance(). Weirdly, the necessary SQL scripts are not shipped with the .zip file available on pgRouting’s download page. You need:

routing_dd.sql
routing_dd_wrappers.sql

Both are available through the project repository at Github. Get them and execute them in your pgRouting-enabled database. Now, you should be ready.

Calculating driving distances

To calculate driving distances, we need a query very similar to shortest_path():

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION driving_distance(
sql text,
source_id integer,
distance float8,
directed boolean,
has_reverse_cost boolean)
RETURNS SETOF path_result

The only new value is “distance”. That’s the maximum distance/cost you want to be contained in the result set. “distance” has to be specified in the same units as the cost attribute (which is specified in the “sql” text parameter).

Note: In my opinion, the name “(driving) distance” is misleading. While you can use distance as a cost attribute, you’re not limited to distances. You can use any cost attribute you like, e.g. travel time, fuel consumption, co2 emissions, …

The actual query for a catchment area of 100 km around node # 2000 looks like this:

SELECT * FROM driving_distance('
      SELECT gid AS id,
          start_id::int4 AS source,
          end_id::int4 AS target,
          shape_leng::float8 AS cost
      FROM network',
      2000,
      100000,
      false,
      false)

Interpreting the result

These are the first lines of the result set:

vertex_id;edge_id;cost
294;7262;97400.433506144
297;7236;98012.620979231
335;1095;96849.456306244
347;7263;93617.693852324
364;7098;93573.849081386
366;2551;92702.443434779
378;7263;91994.328368081

The cost attribute contains the total cost of travel from the starting node to the vertex_id node.
We will only be using vertex_id and cost. The use of edge_id is a mystery to me.

Visualizing the result

The easiest way to visualize driving_distance() results is using RT Sql Layer plugin. We need to join the results of driving_distance() with the table containing node geometries:

SELECT *
   FROM node
   JOIN
   (SELECT * FROM driving_distance('
      SELECT gid AS id,
          start_id::int4 AS source,
          end_id::int4 AS target,
          shape_leng::float8 AS cost
      FROM network',
      2000,
      100000,
      false,
      false)) AS route
   ON
   node.id = route.vertex_id

If you color the nodes based on the cost attribute, it will look something like this:

result of pgRouting driving_distance() visualized in QGIS


Drive Time Isochrones – An Example Using Finnish Airports

Site analyses can benefit greatly from using “drive-time” isochrones to define the study area. Drive time isochrones are often significantly different from simple buffer areas which disregard natural barriers such as rivers or slow roads.

Of course, creating drive time isochrones requires more input data and more compute-intensive algorithms than a simple buffer analysis. It is necessary to create a routable network graph with adequate weights to be used by the routing algorithm.

One of the most popular routing  applications in the open source world is pgRouting for PostGIS enabled databases. I’ve already shown how to create drive time isochrones for one network node based on pgRouting and QGIS.  Today, I’ll show how to create drive time isochrones for a set of points – in this case all airports in Finland.

The first step is to find the closest network node to every airport:

ALTER TABLE airport
   ADD COLUMN nearest_node integer;

CREATE TABLE temp AS
   SELECT a.gid, b.id, min(a.dist)
   FROM
     (SELECT airport.gid,
             min(distance(airport.the_geom, node.the_geom)) AS dist
      FROM airport, node
      GROUP BY airport.gid) AS a,
     (SELECT airport.gid, node.id,
             distance(airport.the_geom, node.the_geom) AS dist
      FROM airport, node) AS b
   WHERE a.dist = b. dist
         AND a.gid = b.gid
   GROUP BY a.gid, b.id;

UPDATE airport
SET nearest_node =
   (SELECT id
    FROM temp
    WHERE temp.gid = airport.gid);

Then, we can calculate drive times between network nodes and “airport nodes”. I am still looking for the most efficient way to perform this calculation. The trivial solution I used for this example was to calculate all drive time values separately for each airport node (as described in “Creating Catchment Areas with pgRouting and QGIS”). Afterwards, I combined the values to find the minimum drive time for each network node:

CREATE table catchment_airport_final AS
SELECT id, the_geom, min (cost) AS cost
FROM catchment_airport
GROUP By id, the_geom;

The resulting point layer was imported into QGIS. Using TIN interpolation (from Interpolation plugin), you can calculate a continuous cost surface. And Contour function (from GDALTools) finally yields drive time isochrones.

Drive time isochrones around airports in northern Finland

Based on this analysis, it is possible to determine how many inhabitants live within one hour driving distance from an airport or how many people have to drive longer than e.g. ninety minutes to reach any airport.


Creating Catchment Areas with pgRouting and QGIS

Based on the network created in my last post, I’ll now describe how to calculate the catchment area of a network node.

We need both network and node table. The cost attribute in my network table is called traveltime. (I used different speed values based on road category to calculate traveltime for road segments.) The result will be a new table containing all nodes and an additional cost attribute. And this is the query that calculates the catchment area around node #5657:

create table catchment_5657 as
select
    id,
    the_geom,
    (select sum(cost) from (
	   SELECT * FROM shortest_path('
	   SELECT gid AS id,
		  start_id::int4 AS source,
		  end_id::int4 AS target,
		  traveltime::float8 AS cost
	   FROM network',
	   5657,
	   id,
	   false,
	   false)) as foo ) as cost
from node

Then, I loaded the point table into QGIS and calculated a TIN based on the cost attribute. With “Contour” from GdalTools, you can visualize equal-cost areas even better:

Catchment area around node #5657 with contour lines

Between contour lines, there is a difference of 10 minutes travel time.


A Beginner’s Guide to pgRouting

The aim of this post is to describe the steps necessary to calculate routes with pgRouting. In the end, we’ll visualize the results in QGIS.

This guide assumes that you have the following installed and running:

  • Postgres with PostGIS and pgAdmin
  • QGIS with PostGIS Manager and RT Sql Layer plugins

Installing pgRouting

pgRouting can be downloaded from www.pgrouting.org.

Building from source is covered by pgRouting documentation. If you’re using Windows, download the binaries and copy the .dlls into PostGIS’ lib folder, e.g. C:\Program Files (x86)\PostgreSQL\8.4\lib.

Start pgAdmin and create a new database based on your PostGIS template. (I called mine ‘routing_template’.) Open a Query dialog, load and execute the three .sql files located in your pgRouting download (routing_core.sql, routing_core_wrappers.sql, routing_topology.sql). Congratulations, you now have a pgRouting-enabled database.

Creating a routable road network

The following description is based on the free road network published by National Land Survey of Finland (NLS). All you get is one Shapefile containing line geometries, a road type attribute and further attributes unrelated to routing.

pgRouting requires each road entry to have a start and an end node id. We’ll create those now:

First step is to load roads.shp into PostGIS. This is easy using PostGIS Manager – Data – Load Data from Shapefile.

Next, we create start and end point geometries. I used a view:

CREATE OR REPLACE VIEW road_ext AS
   SELECT *, startpoint(the_geom), endpoint(the_geom)
   FROM road;

Now, we create a table containing all the unique network nodes (start and end points) and we’ll also give them an id:

CREATE TABLE node AS
   SELECT row_number() OVER (ORDER BY foo.p)::integer AS id,
          foo.p AS the_geom
   FROM (
      SELECT DISTINCT road_ext.startpoint AS p FROM road_ext
      UNION
      SELECT DISTINCT road_ext.endpoint AS p FROM road_ext
   ) foo
   GROUP BY foo.p;

Finally, we can combine our road_ext view and node table to create the routable network table:

CREATE TABLE network AS
   SELECT a.*, b.id as start_id, c.id as end_id
   FROM road_ext AS a
      JOIN node AS b ON a.startpoint = b.the_geom
      JOIN node AS c ON a.endpoint = c.the_geom

(This can take a while.)

I recommend adding a spatial index to the resulting table.

Calculating shortest routes

Let’s try pgRouting’s Shortest Path Dijkstra method. The following query returns the route from node #1 to node #5110:

SELECT * FROM shortest_path('
   SELECT gid AS id,
          start_id::int4 AS source,
          end_id::int4 AS target,
          shape_leng::float8 AS cost
   FROM network',
1,
5110,
false,
false)

Final step: Visualization

With RT Sql Layer plugin, we can visualize the results of a query. The results will be loaded as a new layer. The query has to contain both geometry and a unique id. Therefore, we’ll join the results of the previous query with the network table containing the necessary geometries.

SELECT *
   FROM network
   JOIN
   (SELECT * FROM shortest_path('
      SELECT gid AS id,
          start_id::int4 AS source,
          end_id::int4 AS target,
          shape_leng::float8 AS cost
      FROM network',
      1,
      5110,
      false,
      false)) AS route
   ON
   network.gid = route.edge_id

In my case, this is how the result looks like:

Route from node #1 to node #5110


Routing Multiple Vehicles with pgRouting DARP Function

pgRouting has become even more powerful: A DARP (Dial-a-Ride-Problem) solver is now available in the “darp branch” of the pgRouting repository.

The Dial-a-Ride Problem (DARP) solver tries to minimize transportation cost while satisfying customer service level constraints (time windows violation, waiting and travelling times) and fleet constraints (number of cars and capacity, as well as depot location).

Documentation can be found at www.pgrouting.org/docs.


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