Page 1 of 2 (37 posts)

  • talks about »
  • postgis

Tags

Last update:
Fri Oct 24 10:20:18 2014

A Django site.

QGIS Planet

Training courses calendar: QGIS (Desktop, Server and Web) and PostGIS

We just published our Training Courses calendar for the period September 2014 – January 2015. This includes training courses about QGIS (Desktop, Server and Web) and PostgreSQL/PostGIS in both Italy and Portugal. Training courses about QGIS python programming are available on demand. For details (locations, prices, discounts, etc.) about training courses in Portugal see: http://www.faunalia.eu/pt/training.html […]

Packaging PostGIS dev releases with Docker

Packaging PostGIS dev releases with Docker

We recently added support for GML curves to PostGIS, which enables TinyOWS to deliver WFS requests with curve geometries. More on this in a later post. This enhancement is in the current PostGIS developement version (SVN master) and not released yet. To enable our customer testing this functionality, we had to build packages for their server environment which is Ubuntu Precise with UbuntuGIS repositories. After working with Linux LXC containers and it's predecessor VServer for years, Docker was a logical choice for a clean reproducible build environment.

Rebuilding a Debian package is usually quite easy:

apt-get build-dep <package>
apt-get source <package>
cd <packagedir>
#Make your changes
dch -i
dpkg-buildpackage

But getting build dependencies for PostGIS currently fails with libssl-dev conflicts, maybe because the dev packages got out of sync after the recent Heartblead updates. So the Dockerfile uses equivs to build a dummy package which satisfies the dependencies.

The command

docker run -v /tmp:/pkg sourcepole/postgis-svn-build-env sh -c 'cp /root/*postgis*.deb /pkg'

loads the Docker image with packages built from the latest SVN version of PostGIS in /root and copies the deb files from the containter into /tmp.

Now we're ready to install these packages on the Ubuntu server:

sudo dpkg -i /tmp/*postgis*.deb

Thats it. Feedback welcome!

@PirminKalberer

P.S.

If you happen to be a developer, then you may prefer running a cutting-edge version of PostGIS in a Docker container instead of building packages. Our colleagues from Oslandia just published how to do this.

Packaging PostGIS dev releases with Docker

Packaging PostGIS dev releases with Docker

We recently added support for GML curves to PostGIS, which enables TinyOWS to deliver WFS requests with curve geometries. More on this in a later post. This enhancement is in the current PostGIS developement version (SVN master) and not released yet. To enable our customer testing this functionality, we had to build packages for their server environment which is Ubuntu Precise with UbuntuGIS repositories. After working with Linux LXC containers and it's predecessor VServer for years, Docker was a logical choice for a clean reproducible build environment.

Rebuilding a Debian package is usually quite easy:

apt-get build-dep <package>
cd <packagedir>
#Make your changes
dch -i
dpkg-buildpackage

But getting build dependencies for PostGIS currently fails with libssl-dev conflicts, maybe because the dev packages got out of sync after the recent Heartblead updates. So the Dockerfile uses equivs to build a dummy package which satisfies the dependencies.

The command

docker run -v /tmp:/pkg sourcepole/postgis-svn-build-env sh -c 'cp /root/*postgis*.deb /pkg'

loads the Docker image with packages built from the latest SVN version of PostGIS in /root and copies the deb files from the containter into /tmp.

Now we're ready to install these packages on the Ubuntu server:

sudo dpkg -i /tmp/*postgis*.deb

Thats it. Feedback welcome!

@PirminKalberer

P.S.

If you happen to be a developer, then you may prefer running a cutting-edge version of PostGIS in a Docker container instead of building packages. Our colleagues from Oslandia just published how to do this.

Installing PostGIS on Fedora 20

In order to explore all the new interfaces to PostGIS (from QGIS, GDAL, GRASS GIS 7 and others) I decided to install PostGIS 2.1 on my Fedora 20 Linux box. Eventually it is an easy job but I had to visit a series of blogs to refresh my dark memories from past PostGIS installations done some years ago… So, here the few steps:

# become root
su -
# grab the PostgreSQL 9.3 server and PostGIS 2.1
yum install postgresql-server postgresql-contrib postgis

Now the server is installed but yet inactive and not configured. The next step is to initialize, configure and start the PostgreSQL server:

# initialize DB:
postgresql-setup initdb
# start at boot time:
chkconfig postgresql on
# fire up the daemon:
service postgresql start

A test connection will show that we need to configure TCP/IP connections:

# this will fail
psql -l
psql: could not connect to server: No such file or directory
    Is the server running locally and accepting
    connections on Unix domain socket "/var/run/postgresql/.s.PGSQL.5432"?

So we enable TCP/IP connections listening on port 5432:

# edit "postgresql.conf" with editor of choice (nano, vim, ...),
# add line "listen_addresses = '*'":
vim /var/lib/pgsql/data/postgresql.conf
...
listen_addresses = '*'
#listen_addresses = 'localhost'         # what IP address(es) to listen on;
...

Now restart the PostgreSQL daemon:

# restart to re-read configuration
service postgresql restart

Check if the server is now listening on TCP/IP:

# check network connections:
netstat -l | grep postgres
tcp        0      0 0.0.0.0:postgres        0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN     
tcp6       0      0 [::]:postgres           [::]:*                  LISTEN     
unix  2      [ ACC ]     STREAM     LISTENING     2236495  /var/run/postgresql/.s.PGSQL.543

So far so nice. Still PostGIS is not yet active, and we need a database user “gisuser” with password:

# switch from root user to postgres user:
su - postgres
# create new DB user with password (will prompt you for it, choose a strong one):
createuser --pwprompt --encrypted gisuser

Finally we create a first database “gis”:

# create new DB
createdb --encoding=UTF8 --owner=gisuser gis

We enable it for PostGIS 2.1:

# insert PostGIS SQL magic (it should finish with a "COMMIT"):
psql -d gis -f /usr/share/pgsql/contrib/postgis-64.sql

That’s it! Now exit from the “postgres” user account a the “root” account:

# exit from PG user account (back to "root" account level):
exit

In case you want to reach the PostgreSQL/PostGIS server from outside your machine (i.e. from the network), you need to enable PostgreSQL for that:

# enable the network in pg_hba.conf (replace host line; perhaps comment IP6 line):
vim /var/lib/pgsql/data/pg_hba.conf

...
host    all             all             all                     md5
...

# save and restart the daemon:
service postgresql restart

Time for another connection test:

# we try our new DB user account on the new database (hostname is the 
# name of the server in the network):
psql --user gisuser -h hostname -l
Password for user gisuser: xxxxxx

Wonderful, we are connected!

# exit from root account:
exit
[neteler@oboe ] $

Now have our PostGIS database ready!

What’s left? Get some spatial data in as a normal user:

# nice tool
shp2pgsql-gui
shp2pgsql-gui

Using the shp2pgsql-gui

Next pick a SHAPE file and upload it to PostGIS with “Import”.

Now connect to your PostGIS database with QGIS or GRASS GIS and enjoy!

See also: https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/PostgreSQL

The post Installing PostGIS on Fedora 20 appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

OSGeo Code Sprint, Vienna

This is how OSGeo happens.  These are the folk who bring us a lot of that open-source geo-spatial goodness. You can follow the code sprint on Twitter using the hashtags #csprint and #viennacodesprint14

 


Two book recommendations

I recently finished reading two books which may be of interest to open-source GIS users – “PostGIS Cookbook” and “The PyQGIS Programmer’s Guide“, both of which I highly recommend:

PostGIS Cookbook

PostGIS CookbookI’ve been a fan of Stephen Mather’s blog for a while now, and have consistently found it to be a great source of trustworthy information and creative solutions to GIS problems. So when I first saw mention of his work on the PostGIS Cookbook I knew it would be a must-read for me. PostGIS is an essential part of my daily toolkit, and I’ll quickly devour any tutorial or guide which can lead me to better ways to put it to use. And that’s exactly what this book is! It’s full of tips and guides which has inspired me in a lot of techniques I’d never tried or even thought possible in PostGIS.

It’s important to point out that this book isn’t a training manual or beginner’s guide to PostGIS. It assumes readers are already familiar with using PostGIS and have a good understanding of GIS software in general. (If you’re looking for a book to start from scratch with PostGIS, PostGIS in Action is a better fit). I think that’s really what makes this book stand out though. There’s currently not a lot of books available covering PostGIS, and as far as I’m aware the PostGIS Cookbook is the only book available which is targeted to experienced PostGIS users.

Highlights for me are:

  • A great explanation and write up on optimised KNN filtering in PostGIS (something which often trips me up)
  • The detailed guide to topologically correct simplification of features
  • The exploration of PgRouting, which is a great introduction to PostGIS’ routing abilities
  • The “PostGIS and the web” chapter – I really wasn’t expecting this, but it’s quite eye opening (I’m going to have to do some digging into GeoDjango sometime)

The only criticism I have with this book is that it jumps around a lot between operating systems. While most of the code is provided for both Linux/OSX and Windows, there’s occasional examples which only have code for one specific operating system. It’s a little jarring and assumes the user is well versed in their particular operating system to workaround these omissions.

Overall, I strongly recommend the PostGIS Cookbook, and would consider it a must have for anyone serious about expanding their PostGIS abilities. (Also, looks like the publisher, Packt, have a two-for-one sale going at the moment, so it’s a good time to grab this title).

The PyQGIS Programmer’s Guide

The PyQGIS Programmer's GuideThe second book I’ve just finished reading is Gary Sherman’s “The PyQGIS Programmer’s Guide“. For those who are unaware, Gary was the original founder of QGIS back in 2002, so you can be confident that he knows exactly what he’s writing about. In The PyQGIS Programmer’s Guide  Gary has created an in-depth guide on how to get started with programming for QGIS using python. It takes readers all the way from simple scripts right through to developing QGIS plugins and standalone applications based on the QGIS API.

This book fills an important void in the literature available for QGIS. Previously, the PyQGIS Developer Cookbook was the only available guide for QGIS python scripting, and unfortunately it’s a little out-of-date now. PyQGIS scripting can be a steep learning curve and that’s why this book is so appreciated.

It would be valuable to have some python knowledge and experience prior to reading this book. While the “Python Basics” chapter quickly runs through an introduction to the language, the book makes no claims to be a comprehensive python tutorial. But if you’ve dabbled in the language before and have familiarity with the python way of doing things you’ll easily be able to follow along.

Highlights are:

  • The “Tips and Techniques” chapter, which is a great mini-reference for performing a range of common tasks in PyQGIS (including loading layers, changing symbol styles, editing feature attributes, etc).
  • A complete tutorial for creating a QGIS plugin
  • A guide to debugging PyQGIS code and plugins

I’d definitely recommend that anyone who wants to get started with PyQGIS start with Gary’s work – you’ll find it the perfect place to begin.

50th ICA-OSGeo Lab established at Fondazione Edmund Mach (FEM)

We are pleased to announce that the 50th ICA-OSGeo Lab has been established at the GIS and Remote Sensing Unit (Piattaforma GIS & Remote Sensing, PGIS), Research and Innovation Centre (CRI), Fondazione Edmund Mach (FEM), Italy. CRI is a multifaceted research organization established in 2008 under the umbrella of FEM, a private research foundation funded by the government of Autonomous Province of Trento. CRI focuses on studies and innovations in the fields of agriculture, nutrition, and environment, with the aim to generate new sharing knowledge and to contribute to economic growth, social development and the overall improvement of quality of life.

The mission of the PGIS unit is to develop and provide multi-scale approaches for the description of 2-, 3- and 4-dimensional biological systems and processes. Core activities of the unit include acquisition, processing and validation of geo-physical, ecological and spatial datasets collected within various research projects and monitoring activities, along with advanced scientific analysis and data management. These studies involve multi-decadal change analysis of various ecological and physical parameters from continental to landscape level using satellite imagery and other climatic layers. The lab focuses on the geostatistical analysis of such information layers, the creation and processing of indicators, and the production of ecological, landscape genetics, eco-epidemiological and physiological models. The team pursues actively the development of innovative methods and their implementation in a GIS framework including the time series analysis of proximal and remote sensing data.

The GIS and Remote Sensing Unit (PGIS) members strongly support the peer reviewed approach of Free and Open Source software development which is perfectly in line with academic research. PGIS contributes extensively to the open source software development in geospatial (main contributors to GRASS GIS), often collaborating with various other developers and researchers around the globe. In the new ICA-OSGeo lab at FEM international PhD students, university students and trainees are present.

PGIS is focused on knowledge dissemination of open source tools through a series of courses designed for specific user requirement (schools, universities, research institutes), blogs, workshops and conferences. Their recent publication in Trends in Ecology and Evolution underlines the need on using Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) for completely open science. Dr. Markus Neteler, who is leading the group since its formation, has two decades of experience in developing and promoting open source GIS software. Being founding member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo.org, USA), he served on its board of directors from 2006-2011. Luca Delucchi, focal point and responsible person for the new ICA-OSGeo Lab is member of the board of directors of the Associazione Italiana per l’Informazione Geografica Libera (GFOSS.it, the Italian Local Chapter of OSGeo). He contributes to several Free and Open Source software and open data projects as developer and trainer.

Details about the GIS and Remote Sensing Unit at http://gis.cri.fmach.it/

Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) is a not-for-profit organisation founded in 2006 whose mission is to support and promote the collaborative development of open source geospatial technologies and data.

International Cartographic Association (ICA) is the world authoritative body for cartography and GIScience. See also the new ICA-OSGeo Labs website.

Public transport isochrones with pgRouting

This post covers a simple approach to calculating isochrones in a public transport network using pgRouting and QGIS.

For this example, I’m using the public transport network of Vienna which is loaded into a pgRouting-enable database as network.publictransport. To create the routable network run:

select pgr_createTopology('network.publictransport', 0.0005, 'geom', 'id');

Note that the tolerance parameter 0.0005 (units are degrees) controls how far link start and end points can be apart and still be considered as the same topological network node.

To create a view with the network nodes run:

create or replace view network.publictransport_nodes as
select id, st_centroid(st_collect(pt)) as geom
from (
	(select source as id, st_startpoint(geom) as pt
	from network.publictransport
	) 
union
	(select target as id, st_endpoint(geom) as pt
	from network.publictransport
	) 
) as foo
group by id;

To calculate isochrones, we need a cost attribute for our network links. To calculate travel times for each link, I used speed averages: 15 km/h for buses and trams and 32km/h for metro lines (similar to data published by the city of Vienna).

alter table network.publictransport add column length_m integer;
update network.publictransport set length_m = st_length(st_transform(geom,31287));

alter table network.publictransport add column traveltime_min double precision;
update network.publictransport set traveltime_min = length_m  / 15000.0 * 60; -- average is 15 km/h
update network.publictransport set traveltime_min = length_m  / 32000.0 * 60 where "LTYP" = '4'; -- average metro is 32 km/h

That’s all the preparations we need. Next, we can already calculate our isochrone data using pgr_drivingdistance, e.g. for network node #1:

create or replace view network.temp as
 SELECT seq, id1 AS node, id2 AS edge, cost, geom
  FROM pgr_drivingdistance(
    'SELECT id, source, target, traveltime_min as cost FROM network.publictransport',
    1, 100000, false, false
  ) as di
  JOIN network.publictransport_nodes pt
  ON di.id1 = pt.id;

The resulting view contains all network nodes which are reachable within 100,000 cost units (which are minutes in our case).

Let’s load the view into QGIS to visualize the isochrones:

isochrone_publictransport_1

The trick is to use data-defined size to calculate the different walking circles around the public transport stops. For example, we can set up 10 minute isochrones which take into account how much time was used to travel by pubic transport and show how far we can get by walking in the time that is left:

1. We want to scale the circle radius to reflect the remaining time left to walk. Therefore, enable Scale diameter in Advanced | Size scale field:

scale_diameter

2. In the Simple marker properties change size units to Map units.
3. Go to data defined properties to set up the dynamic circle size.

datadefined_size

The expression makes sure that only nodes reachable within 10 minutes are displayed. Then it calculates the remaining time (10-"cost") and assumes that we can walk 100 meters per minute which is left. It additionally multiplies by 2 since we are scaling the diameter instead of the radius.

To calculate isochrones for different start nodes, we simply update the definition of the view network.temp.

While this approach certainly has it’s limitations, it’s a good place to start learning how to create isochrones. A better solution should take into account that it takes time to change between different lines. While preparing the network, more care should to be taken to ensure that possible exchange nodes are modeled correctly. Some network links might only be usable in one direction. Not to mention that there are time tables which could be accounted for ;)


pgRouting 2.0 for Windows quick guide

This post is a quick instruction for installing Postgres 9.2, PostGIS 2.0 and pgRouting 2.0.

  1. For Postgres, download the installer from enterprisedb.com.
  2. Run the installer. You’ll have to pick a superuser password – remember it, you’ll need it again soon.
  3. At the end of the installation process, allow the installer to start Stack Builder.
  4. In Stack Builder, select the Postgres 9.2 installation and install PostGIS from the list of available extensions.
  5. The PostGIS installation procedure will prompt you for the superuser password you picked before.
  6. I suggest letting the installer create a sample database We’ll need it later anyway.

Now for the pgRouting part:

  1. Download the pgRouting zip file for your system (32 or 64 bit) from Winnie.
  2. Unzip the file. It contains bin, lib and share folders as well as two text files.
  3. Copy these folders and files over to your Postgres installation. In my case C:\Program Files\PostgreSQL\9.2

Installation – done.

Next, fire up pgAdmin. If you allowed the PostGIS installer to create a sample database, you will find it named postgis20 or similar. Otherwise just create a new database using the PostGIS template database. You can enable pgRouting in a database using the following steps:

  1. In postgis20, execute the following query to create the pgrouting extension. This will add the pgRouting-specific functions:
    CREATE EXTENSION pgrouting;
  2. Test if everything worked fine:
    SELECT pgr_version();

    It should return "(2.0.0-dev,v2.0.0-beta,18,a3be38b,develop,1.46.1)" or similar – depending on the version you downloaded.

pgadmin_pgrouting

How about some test data? I’ll be using the public transport network of the city of Vienna provided in GeoJSON format from http://data.wien.gv.at/daten/wfs?service=WFS&request=GetFeature&version=1.1.0&typeName=ogdwien:OEFFLINIENOGD&srsName=EPSG:4326&outputFormat=json:

  1. Just copy paste the url in Add Vector Layer | Protocol to load the dataset.
  2. Use DB Manager to load the layer into your database. (As you can see in the screenshot, I created a schema called network but that’s optional.)
  3. import_publictransport

  4. To make the line vector table routable, we use pgr_createTopology. This function assumes the columsn called “source” and “target” exist so we have to create those as well:
    alter table network.publictransport add column source integer;
    alter table network.publictransport add column target integer;
    select pgr_createTopology('network.publictransport', 0.0001, 'geom', 'id');
    

    I’m quite generously using a tolerance of 0.0001 degrees to build the topology. Depending on your dataset, you might want to be more strict here.

  5. Let’s test it! Route from source #1 to target #3000 using pgr_dijkstra:
    SELECT seq, id1 AS node, id2 AS edge, cost, geom
      FROM pgr_dijkstra(
        'SELECT id, source, target, st_length(geom) as cost FROM network.publictransport',
        1, 3000, false, false
      ) as di
      JOIN network.publictransport pt
      ON di.id2 = pt.id ;

    Note how the query joins the routing results and the network table together. (I’m aware that using the link length as a cost attribute will not lead to realistic results in a public transport network but bear with me for this example.)

  6. We can immediately see the routing results using the Load as new layer option:

select_dijkstra
route

Nice work! pgRouting 2.0 has come a long way. In a post from April this year, Boston GIS even announced to add pgRouting into the Stack Builder. That’s going to make the installation even more smooth.


WFS to PostGIS in 1 Step

This is an update to my previous post “WFS to PostGIS in 3 Steps”. Thanks to Even Rouault’s comments and improvements to GDAL, it is now possible to load Latin1-encoded WFS (like the one by data.wien.gv.at) into PostGIS in just one simple step.

To use the following instructions, you’ll have to get the latest GDAL (release-1600-gdal-mapserver.zip)

You only need to run SDKShell.bat to set up the environment and ogr2ogr is ready for action:

C:\Users\Anita>cd C:\release-1600-gdal-mapserver
C:\release-1600-gdal-mapserver>SDKShell.bat
C:\release-1600-gdal-mapserver>ogr2ogr -overwrite -f PostgreSQL PG:"user=myuser password=mypassword dbname=wien_ogd" "WFS:http://data.wien.gv.at/daten/geoserver/ows?service=WFS&request=GetFeature&version=1.1.0&typeName=ogdwien:BEZIRKSGRENZEOGD&srsName=EPSG:4326"

Thanks everyone for your comments and help!


WFS to PostGIS in 3 Steps

This is a quick note on how to download features from a WFS and import them into a PostGIS database. The first line downloads a zipped Shapefile from the WFS. The second one unzips it and the last one loads the data into my existing “gis_experimental” database:

wget "http://data.wien.gv.at/daten/geoserver/ows?service=WFS&request=GetFeature&version=1.1.0&typeName=ogdwien:BEZIRKSGRENZEOGD&srsName=EPSG:4326&outputFormat=shape-zip" -O BEZIRKSGRENZEOGD.zip
unzip -d /tmp BEZIRKSGRENZEOGD.zip
shp2pgsql -s 4326 -I -S -c -W Latin1 "/tmp/BEZIRKSGRENZEOGD.shp" | psql gis_experimental

Now, I’d just need a loop through the WFS Capabilities to automatically fetch all offered layers … Ideas anyone?

Thanks to Tim for his post “Batch importing shapefiles into PostGIS” which was very useful here.

Update: Many readers have pointed out that ogr2ogr is a great tool for this kind of use cases and can do the above in one line. That’s true – if it works. Unfortunately, it is picky about the supported encodings, e.g. doesn’t want to parse ISO-8859-15. In such cases, the three code lines above can be a good alternative.


Kursprogramm Herbst 2012

Sourcepole bietet Grundlagen- und Aufbau-Kurse für den Betrieb von Geodaten-Infrastrukturen auf der Basis von PostgreSQL/PostGIS und Quantum GIS an. Detaillierte Informationen zu den Kursen, die im Herbst 2012 stattfinden, entnehmen Sie bitte dem Kursprogramm. Die Anmeldung ist ab sofort online möglich. Wir freuen uns darauf Sie in Zürich begüssen zu können.

Installing PostGIS 2.0 on ubuntu

PostGIS 2.0 is out and the awesomness continues! You can install PostGIS 2.0 on Ubuntu using packages which is exactly what I am going to show you here. Read on for details on how to get up and running and do your first simple raster analysis!

Note: You should make good backups first!

Before we begin, you should uninstall your existing postgis packages:

sudo dpkg --purge postgis postgresql-9.1-postgis

Then add a new repository and install PostGIS from there (based on this post):

sudo apt-add-repository ppa:sharpie/for-science  # To get GEOS 3.3.2
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:sharpie/postgis-nightly
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install postgresql-9.1-postgis

Next we should create a new template database (optional but recommended).

createdb -E UTF8 template_postgis2
createlang -d template_postgis2 plpgsql
psql -d postgres -c "UPDATE pg_database SET datistemplate='true' WHERE datname='template_postgis2'"
psql -d template_postgis2 -f /usr/share/postgresql/9.1/contrib/postgis-2.0/postgis.sql
psql -d template_postgis2 -f /usr/share/postgresql/9.1/contrib/postgis-2.0/spatial_ref_sys.sql
psql -d template_postgis2 -f /usr/share/postgresql/9.1/contrib/postgis-2.0/rtpostgis.sql
psql -d template_postgis2 -c "GRANT ALL ON geometry_columns TO PUBLIC;"
psql -d template_postgis2 -c "GRANT ALL ON geography_columns TO PUBLIC;"
psql -d template_postgis2 -c "GRANT ALL ON spatial_ref_sys TO PUBLIC;"
createdb training -T template_postgis2

Ok now we can load a raster (see sample data download below):

raster2pgsql -s 4326 srtm_4326.tif | psql training
shp2pgsql -s 4326 -d -g geom -I places.shp places| psql training

Good - now our spatial database is ready to use - and has raster support! Here is a nice example of what you can do. The query looks up the altitude from the SRTM raster for each place listed using the ST_Value function:

select ST_Value(rast, geom, true) from places, srtm_4326;

It should produce something like this:

Doing a 'point on raster' query on our raster in QGIS

Further reading: A really good place to start is the Boston GIS cheatsheets - I am really looking forward to exploring all the new features that are available in PostGIS 2.0, thanks to all those involved in building it!

Sample data for the example listed

Another bash one-liner - load all natural earth layers into postgis in one go

Having a good world dataset is kind of essential for most GIS users to have as a standard reference dataset, give context to maps and so on. Anita Graser's recent blog post about the Natural Earth Data project added another nice dataset to my world dataset collection. The Natural Earth Data set (I got the 'full' one) is provided as shapefiles. Of course as a PostGIS fan I'd rather have these in my geospatial database, so I wrote a one liner in bash to load all the datasets.

First download the full dataset from here, and then extract the contents into a working directory somewhere. Then simply run this line, adjusting your destination database and schema as needed:

for FILE in `find . -name *.shp`; do \
  BASE=`basename $FILE .shp`; \
  /usr/lib/postgresql/9.1/bin/shp2pgsql -s 4326 -I $FILE world.$BASE \
  | psql gis; done

Ok that looks like four lines above, but only because I added some line breaks so things would be readable on this blog.

Note that you should replace 'world' with the name of the schema you are importing the data into, and 'gis' with the name of the database you are importing your data into. Thanks for the awesome dataset Natural Earth Team!

Osm2po Part 2 – PgRouting on OSM the Easy Way

This is the follow up post to “An osm2po Quickstart” which covers loading the OSM network into PostGIS and using the result with pgRouting. After parsing the OSM file, e.g.

C:\Users\Anita\temp\osm2po-4.2.30>java -jar osm2po-core-4.2.30-signed.jar prefix=at "C:\Users\Anita\Geodaten\OpenStreetMap Data\austria.osm.pbf"

you should find a folder with the name of the prefix you chose inside the osm2po folder. It contains a log file which in turn provides a command line template for importing the OSM network into PostGIS, e.g.

INFO commandline template: psql -U [username] -d [dbname] -q -f "C:\Users\Anita\temp\osm2po-4.2.30\at\at_2po_4pgr.sql"

Using this template, we can easily import the .sql file into an exiting database. My pgRouting-enabled database is called wien_ogd.

C:\Users\Anita\temp\osm2po-4.2.30\at>psql -U [username] -d wien_ogd -q -f C:\Users\Anita\temp\osm2po-4.2.30\at\at_2po_4pgr.sql

Now, the data is ready for usage in QGIS:

The osm2po table in QGIS

Using “pgRouting Layer” plugin, it’s now straightforward to calculate shortest paths. I had to apply some changes to the plugin code, so please get the latest version from Github.

A shortest path in osm2po network

Using osm2po turned out to be far less painful than I expected and I hope you’ll find this post useful too.


A Look at PgRouting find_ node_by_nearest_link_within_distance

The function with the glorious name “find_node_by_nearest_link_within_distance” is part of pgRouting and can be found in matching.sql.

“This function finds nearest node as a source or target of the nearest link”
That means that we can use this function e.g. to find the best road network node for a given address.

The function returns an object of type link_point:

CREATE TYPE link_point AS (id integer, name varchar);

To access only the id value of the nearest node, you can use:

SELECT id(foo.x) 
FROM (
   SELECT find_node_by_nearest_link_within_distance(
	'POINT(14.111 47.911)',
	0.5,
	'nw_table')::link_point as x
) AS foo


A Closer Look at Alpha Shapes in pgRouting

Alpha shapes are generalizations of the convex hull [1]. Convex hulls are well known and widely implemented in GIS systems. Alpha shapes are different in that they capture the shape of a point set. You can watch a great demo of how alpha shapes work on François Bélair’s website “Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Alpha Shapes But Were Afraid to Ask” I borrowed the following pictures from that site:

Alpha shapes for different values of alpha. The left one equals the convex hull of the point set. The right picture represents the alpha shape for a smaller value of alpha

pgRouting comes with an implementation of alpha shapes. There is an alpha shape function: alphashape(sql text) and a convenience wrapper: points_as_polygon(query character varying). The weird thing is that you don’t get to set an alpha value. The only thing supplied to the function is a set of points. Let’s see what kind of results it produces!

Starting point for this experiment is a 10 km catchment zone around node #2699 in my osm road network. Travel costs to nodes are calculated using driving_distance() function. (You can find more information on using this function in Catchment Areas with pgRouting driving_distance().)

CREATE TABLE home_catchment10km AS
SELECT *
   FROM osm_nodes
   JOIN
   (SELECT * FROM driving_distance('
      SELECT gid AS id,
          source,
          target,
          meters AS cost
      FROM osm_roads',
      2699,
      10000,
      false,
      false)) AS route
   ON
   osm_nodes.id = route.vertex_id

After costs are calculated, we can create some alpha shapes. The following queries create the table and insert an alpha shape for all points with a cost of less than 1500:

CREATE TABLE home_isodist (id serial, max_cost double precision);
SELECT AddGeometryColumn('home_isodist','the_geom',4326,'POLYGON',2);

INSERT INTO home_isodist (max_cost, the_geom) (
SELECT 1500, ST_SetSRID(the_geom,4326)
FROM 
  points_as_polygon(
    'SELECT id, ST_X(the_geom) AS x, ST_Y(the_geom) AS y FROM home_catchment10km where cost < 1500'));

In previous posts, I’ve created catchment areas by first interpolating a cost raster and creating contours from there. Now, let’s see how the two different approaches compare!

The following picture shows resulting catchment areas for 500, 1000, 1500, and 2000 meters around a central node. Colored areas show the form of pgRouting alpha shape results. Black contours show the results of the interpolation method:

Comparison of pgRouting alpha shapes and interpolation method

At first glance, results look similar enough. Alpha shape results look like a generalized version of interpolation results. I guess that it would be possible to get even closer if the alpha value could be set to a smaller value. The function should then produce a finer, more detailed polygon.

For a general overview about which areas of a network are reachable within certain costs, pgRouting alpha shapes function seems a viable alternative to the interpolation method presented in previous posts. However, the alpha value used by pgRouting seems too big to produce detailed catchment areas.

[1] http://biogeometry.duke.edu/software/alphashapes/


Guide to Advanced Labeling for OSM Roads

Advanced labeling in QGIS new labeling engine is mostly about data-defined settings. Almost any property of the label can be controlled.

For this example, we will try to mimic the look of the classic Google map with it’s line and label styles. The data for this post is from the OpenStreetMap project provided as Shapefiles by Cloudmade.

After importing the roads into PostGIS using PostGIS Manager Plugin, we can create a view that will contain the necessary label style information. The trick here is to use CASE statements to distinguish between different label “classes”. Motorway labels will be bigger than the rest and the buffer color will be the same color as used for the corresponding lines.

drop view if exists v_osm_roads_styled ;

CREATE VIEW v_osm_roads_styled AS
SELECT *,
CASE WHEN type = 'motorway' THEN 9
     ELSE 8 END
     as font_size,
'black'::TEXT as font_color,
false as font_bold,
false as font_italic,
false as font_underline,
false as font_strikeout,
false as font_family,
1 as buffer_size,
CASE WHEN type = 'motorway' THEN '#fb9139'::TEXT
     WHEN type IN ( 'primary','primary_link','secondary','secondary_link') THEN '#fffb8b'::TEXT
     ELSE 'white'::TEXT END
     as buffer_color
from osm_roads;

In QGIS, we can then load the view and start styling. First, let’s get the line style ready. Using rule-based renderer, it’s easy to create complex styles. In this case, I’ve left it rather simple and don’t distinguish between different zoom levels. That’s a topic for another post :)

Google-style rules for OSM road data

Now for the labels! In “Data defined settings”, we can assign the special attributes created in the database view to the settings.

Completed "Data defined settings"

To achieve an even better look, go to “Advanced” tab and enable “curved” and “on line” placement. “Merge connected lines to avoid duplicate labels” option is very helpful too.

Finally – after adding some water objects (Cloudmade natural.shp) – this is what our result looks like:

Google-style OSM map

This solution can be improved considerably by adding multiple zoom levels with corresponding styles. One obvious difference between the original Google map and this look-alike is the lack of road numbers. Tim’s post on “shield labels” can be a starting point for adding road numbers the way Google does.


Visualizing Global Connections

Today, I’ve been experimenting with data from OpenFlights.org. They offer airport, airline and route data for download. The first idea that came to mind was to connect airports on a shared route by lines. This kind of visualization just looks much nicer if the connections are curved instead of simple straight lines.

Luckily, that’s pretty easy to do using PostGIS. After loading airport positions and route data, we can create the connection lines like this (based on [postgis-users] Great circle as a linestring):

UPDATE experimental.airroutes
SET the_geom =
(SELECT ST_Transform(ST_Segmentize(ST_MakeLine(
       ST_Transform(a.the_geom, 953027),
       ST_Transform(b.the_geom, 953027)
     ), 100000 ), 4326 )
 FROM experimental.airports a, experimental.airports b
 WHERE a.id = airroutes.source_id
   AND b.id = airroutes.dest_id
);

The CRS used in the query is not available in PostGIS by default. You can add it like this (source: spatialreference.org):

INSERT into spatial_ref_sys (srid, auth_name, auth_srid, proj4text, srtext) values ( 953027, 'esri', 53027, '+proj=eqdc +lat_0=0 +lon_0=0 +lat_1=60 +lat_2=60 +x_0=0 +y_0=0 +a=6371000 +b=6371000 +units=m +no_defs ', 'PROJCS["Sphere_Equidistant_Conic",GEOGCS["GCS_Sphere",DATUM["Not_specified_based_on_Authalic_Sphere",SPHEROID["Sphere",6371000,0]],PRIMEM["Greenwich",0],UNIT["Degree",0.017453292519943295]],PROJECTION["Equidistant_Conic"],PARAMETER["False_Easting",0],PARAMETER["False_Northing",0],PARAMETER["Central_Meridian",0],PARAMETER["Standard_Parallel_1",60],PARAMETER["Standard_Parallel_2",60],PARAMETER["Latitude_Of_Origin",0],UNIT["Meter",1],AUTHORITY["EPSG","53027"]]');

This is an example visualization (done in QGIS) showing only flight routes starting from Vienna International Airport:

Flight routes from Vienna International

Connections crossing the date line are currently more problematic. Lines would have to be split, otherwise this is what you’ll get:

Date line trouble


How to create a Table with Geometry Column in PostGIS

Do you need to create a table with a geometry column in PostGIS from scratch?
Can’t remember the syntax of AddGeometryColumn(varchar catalog_name, varchar schema_name, varchar table_name, varchar column_name, integer srid, varchar type, integer dimension)? I can’t. ;)

Let’s make our lives easier: QGIS PostGIS Manager offers a convenient GUI for creating tables with geometry columns:

PostGIS Manager Create Table dialog

The dialog works a lot like what you’re probably used to in pgAdmin – with the added nicety of supporting Geometry columns.

In my opinion, this is the fastest way so far to create a spatially enabled table. It provides a much better user experience than telling users (especially new ones) to use AddGeometryColumn(…


  • Page 1 of 2 ( 37 posts )
  • >>
  • postgis

Back to Top

Sponsors