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Sat Sep 5 11:15:09 2015

A Django site.

QGIS Planet

Syntactic sugar for PyQGIS

PyQGIS now supports a nice new addition for handling edit sessions in layers. This way, changes get committed automatically at the end of a successful (python) edit session.

with edit(layer):
    do your changes here()
See more ›

QGIS developer meeting in Nødebo

During the hackfest I’ve been working on the refactoring of the server component, aimed to wrap the server into a class and create python bindings for the new classes. This work is now in the PR queue and brings a first working python test for the server itself.

The server can now be invoked directly from python, like in the example below:

 

#!/usr/bin/env python
"""
Super simple QgsServer.
"""

from qgis.server import *
from BaseHTTPServer import *

class handler (BaseHTTPRequestHandler):

    server = QgsServer()

    def _doHeaders(self, response):
        l = response.pop(0)
        while l:
            h = l.split(':')
            self.send_header(h[0], ':'.join(h[1:]))
            self.log_message( "send_header %s - %s" % (h[0], ':'.join(h[1:])))
            l = response.pop(0)
        self.end_headers()

    def do_HEAD(self):
        self.send_response(200)
        response = str(handler.server.handleRequestGetHeaders(self.path[2:])).split('\n')
        self._doHeaders(response)

    def do_GET(self):
        response = str(handler.server.handleRequest(self.path[2:])).split('\n')
        i = 0
        self.send_response(200)
        self._doHeaders(response)
        self.wfile.write(('\n'.join(response[i:])).strip())

    def do_OPTIONS(s):
        handler.do_GET(s)

httpd = HTTPServer( ('', 8000), handler)

while True:
    httpd.handle_request()

The python bindings capture the server output instead of printing it on FCGI stdout and allow to pass the request parameters QUERY_STRING directly to the request handler as a string, this makes writing python tests very easy.

QGIS and IPython: the definitive interactive console

Whatever is your level of Python knowledge, when you’ll discover the advantages and super-powers of IPython you will never run the default python console again, really: never!

If you’ve never heard about IPython, discover it on IPython official website, don’t get confused by its notebook, graphics and parallel computing capabilities, it also worth if only used as a substitute for the standard Python shell.

I discovered IPython more than 5 years ago and it literally changed my life: I use it also for debugging instead ofpdb, you can embed an IPython console in your code with:

from IPython import embed; embed()

TAB completion with full introspection

What I like the most in IPython is its TAB completion features, it’s not just like normal text matching while you type but it has full realtime introspection, you only see what you have access to, being it a method of an instance or a class or a property, a module, a submodule or whatever you might think of: it even works when you’re importing something or you are typing a path like in open('/home/.....

Its TAB completion is so powerful that you can even use shell commands from within the IPython interpreter!

Full documentation is just a question mark away

Just type “?” after a method of function to print its docstring or its signature in case of SIP bindings.

Lot of special functions

IPython special functions are available for history, paste, run, include and many more topics, they are prefixed with “%” and self-documented in the shell.

All that sounds great! But what has to do with QGIS?

I personally find the QGIS python console lacks some important features, expecially with the autocompletion (autosuggest). What’s the purpose of having autocompletion when most of the times you just get a traceback because the method the autocompleter proposed you is that of another class? My brain is too small and too old to keep the whole API docs in my mind, autocompletion is useful when it’s intelligent enough to tell between methods and properties of the instance/class on which you’re operating.

Another problem is that the API is very far from being “pythonic” (this isn’t anyone’s fault, it’s just how SIP works), here’s an example (suppose we want the SRID of the first layer):

core.QgsMapLayerRegistry.instance().mapLayers().value()[0].crs().authid()
# TAB completion stops working here^

TAB completion stop working at the first parenthesis :(

What if all those getter would be properties?

registry = core.QgsMapLayerRegistry.instance()
# With a couple of TABs without having to remember any method or function name!
registry.p_mapLayers.values()
[<qgis._core.QgsRasterLayer at 0x7f07dff8e2b0>,
 <qgis._core.QgsRasterLayer at 0x7f07dff8ef28>,
 <qgis._core.QgsVectorLayer at 0x7f07dff48c30>,
 <qgis._core.QgsVectorLayer at 0x7f07dff8e478>,
 <qgis._core.QgsVectorLayer at 0x7f07dff489d0>,
 <qgis._core.QgsVectorLayer at 0x7f07dff48770>]

layer = registry.p_mapLayers.values()[0]

layer.p_c ---> TAB!
layer.p_cacheImage            layer.p_children       layer.p_connect       
layer.p_capabilitiesString    layer.p_commitChanges  layer.p_crs           
layer.p_changeAttributeValue  layer.p_commitErrors   layer.p_customProperty

layer.p_crs.p_ ---> TAB!
layer.p_crs.p_authid               layer.p_crs.p_postgisSrid      
layer.p_crs.p_axisInverted         layer.p_crs.p_projectionAcronym
layer.p_crs.p_description          layer.p_crs.p_recentProjections
layer.p_crs.p_ellipsoidAcronym     layer.p_crs.p_srsid            
layer.p_crs.p_findMatchingProj     layer.p_crs.p_syncDb           
layer.p_crs.p_geographicCRSAuthId  layer.p_crs.p_toProj4          
layer.p_crs.p_geographicFlag       layer.p_crs.p_toWkt            
layer.p_crs.p_isValid              layer.p_crs.p_validationHint   
layer.p_crs.p_mapUnits    

layer.p_crs.p_authid
Out[]: u'EPSG:4326'

This works with a quick and dirty hack: propertize that adds a p_... property to all methods in a module or in a class that

  1. do return something
  2. do not take any argument (except self)

this leaves the original methods untouched (in case they were overloaded!) still allowing full introspection and TAB completion with a pythonic interface.

A few methods are still not working with propertize, so far singleton methods like instance() are not passing unit tests.

IPyConsole: a QGIS IPython plugin

If you’ve been reading up to this point you probably can’t wait to start using IPython inside your beloved QGIS (if that’s not the case, please keep reading the previous paragraphs carefully until your appetite is grown!).

An experimental plugin that brings the magic of IPython to QGIS is now available:
Download IPyConsole

 

Please start exploring QGIS objects and classes and give me some feedback!

 

IPyConsole QGIS plugin

Installation notes

You basically need only a working IPython installation, IPython is available for all major platforms and distributions, please refer to the official documentation.

 

Python SIP C++ bindings tutorial

Since QGIS uses QT libraries, SIP is the natural choice for creating the bindings.

Here are some random notes about this journey into SIP and Python bindings, I hope you’ll find them useful!
We will create a sample C++ library, a simple C++ program to test it and finally, the SIP configuration file and the python module plus a short program to test it.

Create the example library

FIrst we need a C++ library, following  the tutorial on the official SIP website  I created a simple library named hellosip:

 

$ mkdir hellosip
$ cd hellosip
$ touch hellosip.h hellosip.cpp Makefile.lib

This is the content of the header file hellosip.h:

#include <string>

using namespace std;

class HelloSip {
    const string the_word;
public:
    // ctor
    HelloSip(const string w);
    string reverse() const;
};

This is the implementation in file hellosip.cpp , the library just reverse a string, nothing really useful.

#include "hellosip.h"
#include <string>

HelloSip::HelloSip(const string w): the_word(w)
{
}

string HelloSip::reverse() const
{
    string tmp;
    for (string::const_reverse_iterator rit=the_word.rbegin(); rit!=the_word.rend(); ++rit)
        tmp += *rit;
    return tmp;
}

 

Compiling and linking the shared library

Now, its time to compile the library, g++ must be invoked with -fPIC option in order to generate Position Independent Code, -g tells the compiler to generate debug symbols and it is not strictly necessary if you don’t need to debug the library:

g++ -c -g -fPIC hellosip.cpp -o hellosip.o

The linker needs a few options to create a dynamically linked Shared Object (.so) library, first -shared which tells gcc to create a shared library, then the -soname which is the library version name, last -export_dynamic that is also not strictly necessary but can be useful for debugging in case the library is dynamically opened (with dlopen) :

g++ -shared -Wl,-soname,libhellosip.so.1  -g -export-dynamic -o libhellosip.so.1  hellosip.o

At the end of this process, we should have a brand new libhellosip.so.1 sitting in the current directory.

For more informations on shared libraries under linux you can read TLDP chapter on this topic.

 

Using the library with C++

Before starting the binding creation with SIP, we want to test the new library with a simple C++ program stored in a new cpp file: hellosiptest.cpp:

#include "hellosip.h"
#include <string>
using namespace std;
// Prints True if the string is correctly reversed
int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
  HelloSip hs("ciao");
  cout << ("oaic" == hs.reverse() ? "True" : "False") << endl;
  return 0;
}

To compile the program we use the simple command:

g++ hellosiptest.cpp -g -L.  -lhellosip -o hellosiptest

which fails with the following error:

/usr/bin/ld: cannot find -lhellosip
collect2: error: ld returned 1 exit status

For this tutorial, we are skipping the installation part, that would have created proper links from the base soname, we are doing it now with:

ln -s libhellosip.so.1 libhellosip.so

The compiler should now be happy and produce an hellosiptest executable, that can be tested with:

$ ./hellosiptest
True

If we launch the program we might see a new error:

./hellosiptest: error while loading shared libraries: libhellosip.so.1: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory

This is due to the fact that we have not installed our test library system-wide and the operating system is not able to locate and dynamically load the library, we can fix it in the current shell by adding the current path to the LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable which tells the operating system which directories have to be searched for shared libraries. The following commands will do just that:

export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=`pwd`

Note that this environment variable setting is “temporary” and will be lost when you exit the current shell.

 

 

SIP bindings

Now that we know that the library works we can start with the bindings, SIP needs an interface header file with the instructions to create the bindings, its syntax resembles that of a standard C header file with the addition of a few directives, it contains (among other bits) the name of the module and the classes and methods to export.

The SIP header file hellosip.sip contains two blocks of instructions: the class definition that ends around line 15 and an additional %MappedType block that specifies how the std::string type can be translated from/to Python objects, this block is not normally necessary until you stick standard C types. You will notice that the class definition part is quite similar to the C++ header file hellosip.h:

// Define the SIP wrapper to the hellosip library.

%Module hellosip

class HelloSip {

%TypeHeaderCode
#include <hellosip.h>
%End

public:
    HelloSip(const std::string w);
    std::string reverse() const;
};

// Creates the mapping for std::string
// From: http://www.riverbankcomputing.com/pipermail/pyqt/2009-July/023533.html

%MappedType std::string
{
%TypeHeaderCode
#include 
%End

%ConvertFromTypeCode
    // convert an std::string to a Python (unicode) string
    PyObject* newstring;
    newstring = PyUnicode_DecodeUTF8(sipCpp->c_str(), sipCpp->length(), NULL);
    if(newstring == NULL) {
        PyErr_Clear();
        newstring = PyString_FromString(sipCpp->c_str());
    }
    return newstring;
%End

%ConvertToTypeCode
    // Allow a Python string (or a unicode string) whenever a string is
    // expected.
    // If argument is a Unicode string, just decode it to UTF-8
    // If argument is a Python string, assume it's UTF-8
    if (sipIsErr == NULL)
        return (PyString_Check(sipPy) || PyUnicode_Check(sipPy));
    if (sipPy == Py_None) {
        *sipCppPtr = new std::string;
        return 1;
    }
    if (PyUnicode_Check(sipPy)) {
        PyObject* s = PyUnicode_AsEncodedString(sipPy, "UTF-8", "");
        *sipCppPtr = new std::string(PyString_AS_STRING(s));
        Py_DECREF(s);
        return 1;
    }
    if (PyString_Check(sipPy)) {
        *sipCppPtr = new std::string(PyString_AS_STRING(sipPy));
        return 1;
    }
    return 0;
%End
};

At this point we could have run the sip command by hand but the documentation suggests to use the python module sipconfig that, given a few of configuration variables, automatically creates the Makefile for us, the file is by convention named configure.py:

import os
import sipconfig

basename = "hellosip"

# The name of the SIP build file generated by SIP and used by the build
# system.
build_file = basename + ".sbf"

# Get the SIP configuration information.
config = sipconfig.Configuration()

# Run SIP to generate the code.
os.system(" ".join([config.sip_bin, "-c", ".", "-b", build_file, basename + ".sip"]))

# Create the Makefile.
makefile = sipconfig.SIPModuleMakefile(config, build_file)

# Add the library we are wrapping.  The name doesn't include any platform
# specific prefixes or extensions (e.g. the "lib" prefix on UNIX, or the
# ".dll" extension on Windows).
makefile.extra_libs = [basename]

# Search libraries in current directory
makefile.extra_lflags= ['-L.']

# Generate the Makefile itself.
makefile.generate()

We now have a Makefile ready to build the bindings, just run make to build the library. If everything goes right you will find a new hellosip.so library which is the python module. To test it, we can use the following simple program (always make sure that LD_LIBRARY_PATH contains the directory where libhellosip.so is found).

import hellosip
print hellosip.HelloSip('ciao').reverse() == 'oaic'

Download

The full source code of this tutorial can be downloaded from this link.

How to read a raster cell with Python QGIS and GDAL

QGIS and GDAL both have Python bindings, you can use both libraries to read a value from a raster cell, since QGIS uses GDAL libraries under the hood, we can expect to read the exact same value with both systems.

 

Here is a short example about how to do it with the two different approaches, we assume that you are working inside the QGIS python console and the project has a raster file loaded, but with just a few modifications, the example can also be run from a standard python console.

The example raster layer is a DTM with 1000 cells width and 2000 cells height, we want to read the value at the cell with coordinates x = 500 and y = 1000.

# First layer in QGIS project is a DTM 2 bands raster
from osgeo import gdal
# You need this to convert raw values readings from GDAL
import struct

# Read the cell with this raster coordinates
x = 500
y = 1000

# Get the map layer registry
reg = QgsMapLayerRegistry.instance()

# Get the first layer (the DTM raster)
qgis_layer = reg.mapLayers().values()[0]

# Open the raster with GDAL
gdal_layer = gdal.Open(rlayer.source())

"""
Fetches the coefficients for transforming between pixel/line (P,L) raster space, 
and projection coordinates (Xp,Yp) space.
    Xp = padfTransform[0] + P*padfTransform[1] + L*padfTransform[2];
    Yp = padfTransform[3] + P*padfTransform[4] + L*padfTransform[5];
In a north up image, padfTransform[1] is the pixel width, and padfTransform[5] 
is the pixel height. The upper left corner of the upper left pixel is 
at position (padfTransform[0],padfTransform[3]).
"""
gt = gldal_layer.GetGeoTransform()

# o:origin, r:rotation, s:size
xo, xs, xr, yo, yr, ys = gt

# Read band 1 at the middle of the raster ( x = 500, y = 1000)
band = gdal_layer.GetRasterBand(1)
gdal_value = struct.unpack('f', band.ReadRaster(x, y, 1, 1, buf_type=band.DataType))[0]

xcoo = xo + xs * x + xr * y
ycoo = yo + yr * x + ys * y

# Read the value with QGIS, we must pass the map coordinates
# and the exact extent = 1 cell size
qgis_value = qgis_layer.dataProvider().identify(QgsPoint(xcoo, ycoo), \
    QgsRaster.IdentifyFormatValue, \
    theExtent=QgsRectangle( xcoo , ycoo, xcoo + xs, ycoo + ys) )\
    .results()[1]

assert(gdal_value == qgis_value)

QGIS server python plugins tutorial

This is the second article about python plugins for QGIS server, see also the introductory article posted a few days ago.

In this post I will introduce the helloServer example plugin that shows some common implementation patterns exploiting the new QGIS Server Python Bindings API.

Server plugins and desktop interfaces

Server plugins can optionally have a desktop interface exactly like all standard QGIS plugins.

A typical use case for a server plugin that also has a desktop interface is to allow the users to configure the server-side of the plugin from QGIS desktop, this is the same principle of configuring WMS/WFS services of QGIS server from the project properties.

The only important difference it that while the WMS/WFS services configuration is stored in the project file itself, the plugins can store and access project data but not to the user’s settings (because the server process normally runs with a different user). For this reason, if you want to share configuration settings between the server and the desktop, provided that you normally run the server with a different user, paths and permissions have to be carefully configured to grant both users access to the shared data.

 

Server configuration

This is an example configuration for Apache, it covers both FCGI and CGI:

  ServerAdmin webmaster@localhost
  # Add an entry to your /etc/hosts file for xxx localhost e.g.
  # 127.0.0.1 xxx
  ServerName xxx
    # Longer timeout for WPS... default = 40
    FcgidIOTimeout 120 
    FcgidInitialEnv LC_ALL "en_US.UTF-8"
    FcgidInitialEnv PYTHONIOENCODING UTF-8
    FcgidInitialEnv LANG "en_US.UTF-8"
    FcgidInitialEnv QGIS_DEBUG 1
    FcgidInitialEnv QGIS_CUSTOM_CONFIG_PATH "/home/xxx/.qgis2/"
    FcgidInitialEnv QGIS_SERVER_LOG_FILE /tmp/qgis.log
    FcgidInitialEnv QGIS_SERVER_LOG_LEVEL 0
    FcgidInitialEnv QGIS_OPTIONS_PATH "/home/xxx/public_html/cgi-bin/"
    FcgidInitialEnv QGIS_PLUGINPATH "/home/xxx/.qgis2/python/plugins"
    FcgidInitialEnv LD_LIBRARY_PATH "/home/xxx/apps/lib"

    # For simple CGI: ignored by fcgid
    SetEnv QGIS_DEBUG 1
    SetEnv QGIS_CUSTOM_CONFIG_PATH "/home/xxx/.qgis2/"
    SetEnv QGIS_SERVER_LOG_FILE /tmp/qgis.log 
    SetEnv QGIS_SERVER_LOG_LEVEL 0
    SetEnv QGIS_OPTIONS_PATH "/home/xxx/public_html/cgi-bin/"
    SetEnv QGIS_PLUGINPATH "/home/xxx/.qgis2/python/plugins"
    SetEnv LD_LIBRARY_PATH "/home/xxx/apps/lib"

    RewriteEngine On
    
        RewriteCond %{HTTP:Authorization} .
        RewriteRule .* - [E=HTTP_AUTHORIZATION:%{HTTP:Authorization}]
    

  ScriptAlias /cgi-bin/ /home/xxx/apps/bin/
  <Directory "/home/xxx/apps/bin/">
    AllowOverride All
    Options +ExecCGI -MultiViews +FollowSymLinks
    Require all granted  

  ErrorLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/xxx-error.log
  CustomLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/xxx-access.log combined


In this particular example, I’m using a QGIS server built from sources and installed in /home/xxx/apps/bin the libraries are in /home/xxx/apps/lib and LD_LIBRARY_PATH poins to this location.
QGIS_CUSTOM_CONFIG_PATH tells the server where to search for QGIS configuration (for example qgis.db).
QGIS_PLUGINPATH is searched for plugins as start, your server plugins must sit in this directory, while developing you can choose to use the same directory of your QGIS desktop installation.
QGIS_DEBUG set to 1 to enable debug and logging.

Anatomy of a server plugin

For a plugin to be seen as a server plugin, it must provide correct metadata informations and a factory method:

Plugin metadata

A server enabled plugins must advertise itself as a server plugin by adding the line

server=True

in its metadata.txt file.

The serverClassFactory method

A server enabled plugins is basically just a standard QGIS Python plugins that provides a serverClassFactory(serverIface) function in its __init__.py. This function is invoked once when the server starts to generate the plugin instance (it’s called on each request if running in CGI mode: not recommended) and returns a plugin instance:

def serverClassFactory(serverIface):
    from HelloServer import HelloServerServer
    return HelloServerServer(serverIface)

You’ll notice that this is the same pattern we have in “traditional” QGIS plugins.

Server Filters

A server plugin typically consists in one or more callbacks packed into objects called QgsServerFilter.

Each QgsServerFilter implements one or all of the following callbacks:

The following example implements a minimal filter which prints HelloServer! in case the SERVICE parameter equals to “HELLO”.

from qgis.server import *
from qgis.core import *

class HelloFilter(QgsServerFilter):

    def __init__(self, serverIface):
        super(HelloFilter, self).__init__(serverIface)    

    def responseComplete(self):        
        request = self.serverInterface().requestHandler()
        params = request.parameterMap()
        if params.get('SERVICE', '').upper() == 'HELLO':
            request.clearHeaders()
            request.setHeader('Content-type', 'text/plain')
            request.clearBody()
            request.appendBody('HelloServer!')

The filters must be registered into the serverIface as in the following example:

class HelloServerServer:
    def __init__(self, serverIface):
        # Save reference to the QGIS server interface
        self.serverIface = serverIface
        serverIface.registerFilter( HelloFilter, 100 )          

The second parameter of registerFilter allows to set a priority which defines the order for the callbacks with the same name (the lower priority is invoked first).

Full control over the flow

By using the three callbacks, plugins can manipulate the input and/or the output of the server in many different ways. In every moment, the plugin instance has access to the QgsRequestHandler through the QgsServerInterface, the QgsRequestHandler has plenty of methods that can be used to alter the input parameters before entering the core processing of the server (by using requestReady) or after the request has been processed by the core services (by using sendResponse).

The following examples cover some common use cases:

Modifying the input

The example plugin contains a test example that changes input parameters coming from the query string, in this example a new parameter is injected into the (already parsed) parameterMap, this parameter is then visible by core services (WMS etc.), at the end of core services processing we check that the parameter is still there.

from qgis.server import *
from qgis.core import *

class ParamsFilter(QgsServerFilter):

    def __init__(self, serverIface):
        super(ParamsFilter, self).__init__(serverIface)

    def requestReady(self):
        request = self.serverInterface().requestHandler()
        params = request.parameterMap( )
        request.setParameter('TEST_NEW_PARAM', 'ParamsFilter')

    def responseComplete(self):
        request = self.serverInterface().requestHandler()
        params = request.parameterMap( )
        if params.get('TEST_NEW_PARAM') == 'ParamsFilter':
            QgsMessageLog.logMessage("SUCCESS - ParamsFilter.responseComplete", 'plugin', QgsMessageLog.INFO)
        else:
            QgsMessageLog.logMessage("FAIL    - ParamsFilter.responseComplete", 'plugin', QgsMessageLog.CRITICAL)

This is an extract of what you see in the log file:

src/core/qgsmessagelog.cpp: 45: (logMessage) [0ms] 2014-12-12T12:39:29 plugin[0] HelloServerServer - loading filter ParamsFilter
src/core/qgsmessagelog.cpp: 45: (logMessage) [1ms] 2014-12-12T12:39:29 Server[0] Server plugin HelloServer loaded!
src/core/qgsmessagelog.cpp: 45: (logMessage) [0ms] 2014-12-12T12:39:29 Server[0] Server python plugins loaded
src/mapserver/qgsgetrequesthandler.cpp: 35: (parseInput) [0ms] query string is: SERVICE=HELLO&request=GetOutput
src/mapserver/qgshttprequesthandler.cpp: 547: (requestStringToParameterMap) [1ms] inserting pair SERVICE // HELLO into the parameter map
src/mapserver/qgshttprequesthandler.cpp: 547: (requestStringToParameterMap) [0ms] inserting pair REQUEST // GetOutput into the parameter map
src/mapserver/qgsserverfilter.cpp: 42: (requestReady) [0ms] QgsServerFilter plugin default requestReady called
src/core/qgsmessagelog.cpp: 45: (logMessage) [0ms] 2014-12-12T12:39:29 plugin[0] HelloFilter.requestReady
src/mapserver/qgis_map_serv.cpp: 235: (configPath) [0ms] Using default configuration file path: /home/xxx/apps/bin/admin.sld
src/mapserver/qgshttprequesthandler.cpp: 49: (setHttpResponse) [0ms] Checking byte array is ok to set...
src/mapserver/qgshttprequesthandler.cpp: 59: (setHttpResponse) [0ms] Byte array looks good, setting response...
src/core/qgsmessagelog.cpp: 45: (logMessage) [0ms] 2014-12-12T12:39:29 plugin[0] HelloFilter.responseComplete
src/core/qgsmessagelog.cpp: 45: (logMessage) [0ms] 2014-12-12T12:39:29 plugin[0] SUCCESS - ParamsFilter.responseComplete
src/core/qgsmessagelog.cpp: 45: (logMessage) [0ms] 2014-12-12T12:39:29 plugin[0] RemoteConsoleFilter.responseComplete
src/mapserver/qgshttprequesthandler.cpp: 158: (sendResponse) [0ms] Sending HTTP response
src/core/qgsmessagelog.cpp: 45: (logMessage) [0ms] 2014-12-12T12:39:29 plugin[0] HelloFilter.sendResponse

On line 13 the “SUCCESS” string indicates that the plugin passed the test.

The same technique can be exploited to use a custom service instead of a core one: you could for example skip a WFS SERVICE request or any other core request just by changing the SERVICE parameter to something different and the core service will be skipped, then you can inject your custom results into the output and send them to the client (this is explained here below).

Changing or replacing the output

The watermark filter example shows how to replace the WMS output with a new image obtained by adding a watermark image on the top of the WMS image generated by the WMS core service:

import os

from qgis.server import *
from qgis.core import *
from PyQt4.QtCore import *
from PyQt4.QtGui import *


class WatermarkFilter(QgsServerFilter):

    def __init__(self, serverIface):
        super(WatermarkFilter, self).__init__(serverIface)

    def responseComplete(self):
        request = self.serverInterface().requestHandler()
        params = request.parameterMap( )
        # Do some checks
        if (request.parameter('SERVICE').upper() == 'WMS' \
                and request.parameter('REQUEST').upper() == 'GETMAP' \
                and not request.exceptionRaised() ):
            QgsMessageLog.logMessage("WatermarkFilter.responseComplete: image ready %s" % request.infoFormat(), 'plugin', QgsMessageLog.INFO)
            # Get the image
            img = QImage()
            img.loadFromData(request.body())
            # Adds the watermark
            watermark = QImage(os.path.join(os.path.dirname(__file__), 'media/watermark.png'))
            p = QPainter(img)
            p.drawImage(QRect( 20, 20, 40, 40), watermark)
            p.end()
            ba = QByteArray()
            buffer = QBuffer(ba)
            buffer.open(QIODevice.WriteOnly)
            img.save(buffer, "PNG")
            # Set the body
            request.clearBody()
            request.appendBody(ba)

In this example the SERVICE parameter value is checked and if the incoming request is a WMS GETMAP and no exceptions have been set by a previously executed plugin or by the core service (WMS in this case), the WMS generated image is retrieved from the output buffer and the watermark image is added. The final step is to clear the output buffer and replace it with the newly generated image. Please note that in a real-world situation we should also check for the requested image type instead of returning PNG in any case.

The power of python

The examples above are just meant to explain how to interact with QGIS server python bindings but server plugins have full access to all QGIS python bindings and to thousands of python libraries, what you can do with python server plugins is just limited by your imagination!

 

See all QGIS Server related posts

Accessing composer item properties via custom expressions in QGIS

So here is a neat trick. Lets say you wanted to access the scale of a composer map to make it part of a label. The scale bar can already be set to numeric to show the number value but what if it needs to be part of an existing label with other text. Not to fear, expression functions are here.

  • Create a new composer. Add the map frame and a label.
  • Set the item ID of the map frame to something you can remember, lets just use themap
  • Select the label and add some text
  • Click Insert Expression

Now for the cool part

  • Select Function Editor
  • Click New File. Give the file a new name and hit save. I called it composer functions.

In the code editor paste this code:

from qgis.utils import iface
from qgis.core import *
from qgis.gui import *

@qgsfunction(args="auto", group='Composer')
def composeritemattr(composername, mapname, attrname, feature, parent):
    composers = iface.activeComposers()
    # Find the composer with the given name
    comp = [composer.composition() for composer in composers 
                if composer.composerWindow().windowTitle() == composername][0]
    # Find the item
    item = comp.getComposerItemById(mapname)
    # Get the attr by name and call 
    return getattr(item, attrname)()
  • Click Run Script

run

Now in your label use this text:

Scale: [% composeritemattr('Composer 1', 'themap', 'scale')%]

Update the Composer 1 to match your composer name, and the themap to match your item ID.

and like magic here is the scale from the map item in a label:

2015-05-21 22_00_09-Composer 1

Check the expression error section if the label doesn’t render

error


Filed under: Open Source, qgis Tagged: composer, python, qgis

Performance for mass updating features on layers

This post discusses how to improve the performance of pyqgis code which updates a lot of features by a factor of more than 10.

PSA: Please use new style Qt signals and slots not the old style

Don’t do this:

self.connect(self.widget, 
             SIGNAL("valueChanged(int)"), 
             self.valuechanged)

It’s the old way, the crappy way. It’s prone to error and typing mistakes. And who really wants to be typing strings as functions and arg names in it. Gross.

Do this:

self.widget.valueChanged.connect(self.valuechanged)
self.widget.valueChanged[str].connect(self.valuechanged)

Much nicer. Cleaner. Looks and feels like Python not some mash up between C++ and Python. The int argument is the default so it will use that. If you to pick the signal type you can use [type].

Don’t do this:

self.emit(SIGNAL("changed()", value1, value2))

Do this

class MyType(QObject):
   changed = pyqtSignal(str, int)

   def stuff(self):
       self.changed.emit(value1, value2)

pyqtSignal is a type you can use to define you signal. It will come with type checking, if you don’t want type checking just do pyqtSignal(object).

Please think of the poor kittens before using the old style in your code.


Filed under: pyqt, python, qgis Tagged: pyqt, qgis, qt

A interactive command bar for QGIS

Something that has been on my mind for a long time is a interactive command interface for QGIS.  Something that you can easily open, run simple commands, and is interactive to ask for arguments when they are needed.

After using the command interface in Emacs for a little bit over the weekend – you can almost hear the Boos! from heavy Vim users :) – I thought this is something I must have in QGIS as well.  I’m sure it can’t be that hard to add.

So here it is.  A interactive command interface for QGIS.

commandbar

commandbar2

The command bar plugin (find it in the plugin installer) adds a simple interactive command bar to QGIS. Commands are defined as Python code and may take arguments.

Here is an example function:

@command.command("Name")
def load_project(name):
    """
    Load a project from the set project paths
    """
    _name = name
    name += ".qgs"
    for path in project_paths:
        for root, dirs, files in os.walk(path):
            if name in files:
                path = os.path.join(root, name)
                iface.addProject(path)
                return
    iface.addProject(_name)

All functions are interactive and if not all arguments are given when called it will prompt for each one.

Here is an example of calling the point-at function with no args. It will ask for the x and then the y

pointat

Here is calling point-at with all the args

pointatfunc

Functions can be called in the command bar like so:

my-function arg1 arg2 arg2

The command bar will split the line based on space and the first argument is always the function name, the rest are arguments passed to the function. You will also note that it will convert _ to - which is easier to type and looks nicer.

The command bar also has auto complete for defined functions – and tooltips once I get that to work correctly.

You can use CTRL + ; (CTRL + Semicolon), or CTRL + ,, to open and close the command bar.

What is a command interface without auto complete

autocomplete

Use Enter to select the item in the list.

How about a function to hide all the dock panels. Sure why not.

@command.command()
def hide_docks():
    docks = iface.mainWindow().findChildren(QDockWidget)
    for dock in docks:
        dock.setVisible(False)

alias command

You can also alias a function by calling the alias function in the command bar.

The alias command format is alias {name} {function} {args}

Here is an example of predefining the x for point-at as mypoint

-> alias mypoint point-at 100

point-at is a built in function that creates a point at x y however we can alias it so that it will be pre-called with the x argument set. Now when we call mypoint we only have to pass the y each time.

-> mypoint
(point-at) What is the Y?: 200

You can even alias the alias command – because why the heck not :)

-> alias a alias
a mypoint 100

a is now the shortcut hand for alias

WHY U NO USE PYTHON CONSOLE

The Python console is fine and dandy but we are not going for a full programming language here, that isn’t the point. The point is easy to use commands.

You could have a function called point_at in Python that would be

point_at(123,1331)

Handling incomplete functions is a lot harder because of the Python parser. In the end it’s easier and better IMO to just make a simple DSL for this and get all the power of a DSL then try and fit into Python.

It should also be noted that the commands defined in the plugin can still be called like normal Python functions because there is no magic there. The command bar is just a DSL wrapper around them.

Notes

This is still a bit of an experiment for me so things might change or things might not work as full expected just yet.

Check out the projects readme for more info on things that need to be done, open to suggestions and pull requests.

Also see the docs page for more in depth information


Filed under: Open Source, python, qgis Tagged: plugin, pyqgis, qgis

Plugin Builder 2.8.1

This minor update to the Plugin Builder allows you to choose where your plugin menu will be located.

Previously your menu was placed under the Plugins menu. At version 2.8.1 you can choose from the following main menu locations:

  • Plugins
  • Database
  • Raster
  • Vector
  • Web

Plugins is the default choice when you open Plugin Builder. The value you choose is also written to the category field in your metadata.txt file. When you view your plugin in the Plugin Manager, the value of category is displayed, aiding folks in finding the menu location.

You can install Plugin Builder 2.8.1 from the Plugins -> Manage and Install Plugins... menu. Version 2.8.1 works on QGIS versions 2.0 and up.

A Quick Guide to Getting Started with PyQGIS on Windows

Getting started with Python and QGIS can be a bit overwhelming. In this post we give you a quick start to get you up and running and maybe make your PyQGIS life a little easier.

There are likely many ways to setup a working PyQGIS development environment---this one works pretty well.

Contents

Requirements

  • OSGeo4W Advanced Install of QGIS
  • pip (for installing/managing Python packages)
  • pb_tool (cross-platform tool for compiling/deploying/distributing QGIS plugin)
  • A customized startup script to set the environment (pyqgis.cmd)
  • IDE (optional)
  • Vim (just kidding)

We'll start with the installs.

Installing

Almost everything we need can be installed using the OSGeo4W installer available on the QGIS website.

OSGeo4W

From the QGIS website, download the appropriate network installer (32 or 64 bit)

  • Run the installer and choose the Advanced Install option
  • Install from Internet
  • Choose a directory for the install---I prefer a path without spaces such as C:\OSGeo4W
  • Accept default for local package directory and Start menu name
  • Tweak network connection option if needed on the Select Your Internet Connection screen
  • Accept default download site location
  • From the Select packages screen, select the following for installation:
    • Desktop -> qgis: QGIS Desktop
    • Libs -> qt4-devel (needed for lrelease/translations)
    • Libs -> setuptools (needed for installing pip)

When you click Next a bunch of additional packages will be suggested---just accept them and continue the install.

Once complete you will have a functioning QGIS install along with the other parts we need. If you want to work with the nightly build of QGIS, choose Desktop -> qgis-dev instead.

If you've already installed QGIS using the OSGeo4W installer, just install the qt4-devel and setutools packages. If you installed QGIS using the standalone installer, the easiest option is to remove it and install from OSGeo4W. You can run both the standalone and OSGeo4W versions on the same machine, but you need to be extra careful not to mix up the environment.

Setting the Environment

To continue with the setup, we need to set the environment by creating a .cmd script. The following is adapted from several sources, and trimmed down to the minimum. Copy and paste it into a file named pyqgis.cmd and save it to a convenient location (like your HOME directory).

@echo off
SET OSGEO4W_ROOT=C:\OSGeo4W
call "%OSGEO4W_ROOT%"\bin\o4w_env.bat
call "%OSGEO4W_ROOT%"\apps\grass\grass-6.4.3\etc\env.bat
@echo off
path %PATH%;%OSGEO4W_ROOT%\apps\qgis\bin
path %PATH%;%OSGEO4W_ROOT%\apps\grass\grass-6.4.3\lib

set PYTHONPATH=%PYTHONPATH%;%OSGEO4W_ROOT%\apps\qgis\python;
set PYTHONPATH=%PYTHONPATH%;%OSGEO4W_ROOT%\apps\Python27\Lib\site-packages
set QGIS_PREFIX_PATH=%OSGEO4W_ROOT%\apps\qgis
set PATH=C:\Program Files (x86)\Git\cmd;C:\Program Files (x86)\Vim\vim74;%PATH%
cd %HOMEPATH%\development
cmd.exe

You should customize the set PATH statement to add any paths you want available when working from the command line. I added paths to my git and vim installs.

The cd %HOMEPATH%\development statement starts the shell in my normal working directory---customize or remove as you see fit.

The last line starts a cmd shell with the settings specified above it. We'll see an example of starting an IDE in a bit.

You can test to make sure all is well by double-clicking on our pyqgis.cmd script, then starting Python and attempting to import one of the QGIS modules:

C:\Users\gsherman\development>python
Python 2.7.5 (default, May 15 2013, 22:44:16) [MSC v.1500 64 bit (AMD64)] on win
32
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import qgis.core
>>>

If you don't get any complaints on import, things are looking good.

Python Packages

We need a couple of Python packages as well.

pip

There are several ways to install pip, but since we installed setuptools we can use easy_install:

easy_install pip

Make sure to issue this command from your customized shell (double-click on pyqgis.cmd to start it).

pb_tool

With pip installed we can use it to install pb_tool:

pip install pb_tool

More information on using pb_tool is available on the project website.

Working on the Command Line

Just double-click on your pyqgis.cmd script from the Explorer or a desktop shortcut to start a cmd shell. From here you can use Python interactively and also use pb_tool to compile and deploy your plugin for testing.

IDE Example

With slight modification, we can start our IDE with the proper settings to recognize the QGIS libraries:

@echo off
SET OSGEO4W_ROOT=C:\OSGeo4W
call "%OSGEO4W_ROOT%"\bin\o4w_env.bat
call "%OSGEO4W_ROOT%"\apps\grass\grass-6.4.3\etc\env.bat
@echo off
path %PATH%;%OSGEO4W_ROOT%\apps\qgis\bin
path %PATH%;%OSGEO4W_ROOT%\apps\grass\grass-6.4.3\lib

set PYTHONPATH=%PYTHONPATH%;%OSGEO4W_ROOT%\apps\qgis\python;
set PYTHONPATH=%PYTHONPATH%;%OSGEO4W_ROOT%\apps\Python27\Lib\site-packages
set QGIS_PREFIX_PATH=%OSGEO4W_ROOT%\apps\qgis
set PATH=C:\Program Files (x86)\Git\cmd;C:\Program Files (x86)\Vim\vim74;%PATH%
cd %HOMEPATH%\development
start "PyCharm aware of Quantum GIS" /B "C:\Program Files (x86)\JetBrains\PyCharm 3.4.1\bin\pycharm.exe" %*

We only changed the last line, adding the start statement with the path to the IDE (PyCharm). If you save this to something like pycharm.cmd, you can double-click on it to start PyCharm. The same method works for other IDEs, such as PyDev.

Within your IDE settings, point it to use the Python interpreter included with OSGeo4W---typically at: %OSGEO4W_ROOT%\bin\python.exe. This will make it pick up all the QGIS goodies needed for development, completion, and debugging. In my case OSGEO4W_ROOT is C:\OSGeo4W, so in the IDE, the path to the correct Python interpreter would be: C:\OSGeo4W\bin\python.exe.

Make sure you adjust the paths in your .cmd scripts to match your system and software locations.

Workflow

Here is an example of a workflow you can use once you're setup for development.

Creating a New Plugin

  1. Use the Plugin Builder plugin to create a starting point [1]
  2. Start your pyqgis.cmd shell
  3. Use pb_tool to compile and deploy the plugin (pb_tool deploy will do it all in one pass)
  4. Activate it in QGIS and test it out
  5. Add code, deploy, test, repeat

Working with Existing Plugin Code

The steps are basically the same was creating a new plugin, except we start by using pb_tool to create a new config file:

  1. Start your pyqgis.cmd shell
  2. Change to the directory containing your plugin code
  3. Use pb_tool create to create a config file
  4. Edit pb_tool.cfg to adjust/add things create may have missed
  5. Start at step 3 in Creating a New Plugin and press on

Troubleshooting

Assuming you have things properly installed, trouble usually stems from an incorrect environment.

  • Make sure QGIS runs and the Python console is available and working
  • Check all the paths in your pygis.cmd or your custom IDE cmd script
  • Make sure your IDE is using the Python interpreter that comes with OSGeo4W


[1] Plugin Builder 2.6 will support generation of a pb_tool config file

How to load a QGIS project in python

Today in a project we are working on we wanted to load a QGIS project. It takes  surprisingly few lines of code to make a small standalone application that loads a project and then shows it as a map in a window like this:

QGIS project in a standalone app

 

Here is the code I wrote to produce this:

The main bit of magic is the QgsLayerTreeMapCanvasBridge class which will convert your project into a layer tree so that the layers appear in the canvas. If you ever need to make a standalone python application with a nice map in it, consider using the QGIS API to do it!

Coordenadas dos cantos do mapa em QGIS | Map corner coordinates in QGIS

O desafio | The challenge

Em tempos na lista de discussão do qgis-pt alguém perguntou como dispor as coordenadas dos cantos do mapa no QGIS. Não estando (ainda) disponível tal funcionalidade, tentei chegar sem sucesso a uma solução que fosse de certa forma automática. Depois de remoer a ideia, e de ler um artigo do Nathan Woodrow, achei que a solução poderia passar por criar uma função para o construtor de expressões que pudesse ser usada em etiquetas no mapa.

Some time ago in qgis-pt mailing list, someone asked how to show the coordinates of a map corners using QGIS. Since this features wasn’t available (yet), I have tried to reach a automatic solution, but without success,  After some though about it and after reading a blog post by Nathan Woodrow, it came to me that the solution could be creating a user defined function for the expression builder to be used in labels in the map.

 A solução | The solution

Seguindo as indicações do referido artigo, comecei por criar um ficheiro userfunctions.py, que gravei na pasta .qgis2/python e, com uma ajuda do Nyall Dawson, escrevi o seguinte código.

Closelly following the blog post instructions, I have created a file called userfunctions.py in the  .qgis2/python folder and, with a help from Nyall Dawson I wrote the following code.

from qgis.utils import qgsfunction, iface
from qgis.core import QGis

@qgsfunction(2,"python")
def map_x_min(values, feature, parent):
 """
 Returns the minimum x coordinate of a map from
 a specific composer.
 """
 composer_title = values[0]
 map_id = values[1]
 composers = iface.activeComposers()
 for composer_view in composers():
  composer_window = composer_view.composerWindow()
  window_title = composer_window.windowTitle()
  if window_title == composer_title:
   composition = composer_view.composition()
   map = composition.getComposerMapById(map_id)
   if map:
    extent = map.currentMapExtent()
    break
 result = extent.xMinimum()
 return result

Depois de correr o comando import userfunctions na consola python (Módulos > Consola python), já conseguia usar a função map_x_min() (disponível na categoria python) numa expressão para obter o valor mínimo em X.

After running the command import userfunctions in the python console  (Plugins > Python Console), it was already possible to use the  map_x_min() function (from the python category) in an expression to get the minimum X value of the map.

Screenshot from 2014-09-09 16^%29^%29
Bastava então criar as restantes funções map_x_max(), map_y_min() e map_y_max(). Como parte do código seria repetida, decidi encapsulá-lo na função map_bound() que recebesse como argumentos o título do compositor de impressão e o id do mapa e me devolvesse a extensão do mesmo (sob a forma de um QgsRectangle).

All I needed now was to create the other three functions,  map_x_max(), map_y_min() and map_y_max().  Since part of code would be repeated, I have decided to put it in a function called map_bound(), that would use the print composer title and map id as arguments, and return the map extent (in the form of a QgsRectangle).

from qgis.utils import qgsfunction, iface
from qgis.core import QGis

def map_bounds(composer_title, map_id):
 """
 Returns a rectangle with the bounds of a map
 from a specific composer
 """
 composers = iface.activeComposers()
 for composer_view in composers:
  composer_window = composer_view.composerWindow()
  window_title = composer_window.windowTitle()
  if window_title == composer_title:
   composition = composer_view.composition()
   map = composition.getComposerMapById(map_id)
   if map:
    extent = map.currentMapExtent()
    break
 else:
  extent = None

 return extent

Com essa função disponível podia usá-la internamente nas funções para devolver cada um dos mínimos e máximos em X e Y, tornando o código mais compacto e fácil de manter. Adicionei ainda ao código original alguns mecanismos para evitar erros.

With this function available, I could now use it in the other functions to obtain the map X and Y minimum and maximum values, making the code more clear and easy to maintain. I also add some mechanisms to the original code to prevent errors.

@qgsfunction(2,"python")
def map_x_min(values, feature, parent):
 """
 Returns the minimum x coordinate of a map from a specific composer.
 Calculations are in the Spatial Reference System of the project.<br>
 <h2>Syntax</h2>
 <p>map_x_min(composer_title, map_id)</p>
 <h2>Arguments</h2>
 <p>composer_title - is string. The title of the composer where the map is.<br>
 map_id - integer. The id of the map.</p>
 <h2>Example</h2>
 <p>map_x_min('my pretty map', 0) -> -12345.679</p>
 """
 composer_title = values[0]
 map_id = values[1]
 map_extent = map_bounds(composer_title, map_id)
 if map_extent:
  result = map_extent.xMinimum()
 else:
  result = None

 return result

@qgsfunction(2,"python")
def map_x_max(values, feature, parent):
 """
 Returns the maximum x coordinate of a map from a specific composer.
 Calculations are in the Spatial Reference System of the project.<br>
 <h2>Syntax</h2>
 <p>map_x_max(composer_title, map_id)</p>
 <h2>Arguments</h2>
 <p>composer_title - is string. The title of the composer where the map is.<br>
 map_id - integer. The id of the map.</p>
 <h2>Example</h2>
 <p>map_x_max('my pretty map', 0) -> 12345.679</p>
 """
 composer_title = values[0]
 map_id = values[1]
 map_extent = map_bounds(composer_title, map_id)
 if map_extent:
  result = map_extent.xMaximum()
 else:
  result = None

 return result

@qgsfunction(2,"python")
def map_y_min(values, feature, parent):
 """
 Returns the minimum y coordinate of a map from a specific composer.
 Calculations are in the Spatial Reference System of the project.<br>
 <h2>Syntax</h2>
 <p>map_y_min(composer_title, map_id)</p>
 <h2>Arguments</h2>
 <p>composer_title - is string. The title of the composer where the map is.<br>
 map_id - integer. The id of the map.</p>
 <h2>Example</h2>
 <p>map_y_min('my pretty map', 0) -> -12345.679</p>
 """
 composer_title = values[0]
 map_id = values[1]
 map_extent = map_bounds(composer_title, map_id)
 if map_extent:
  result = map_extent.yMinimum()
 else:
  result = None

 return result

@qgsfunction(2,"python")
def map_y_max(values, feature, parent):
 """
 Returns the maximum y coordinate of a map from a specific composer.
 Calculations are in the Spatial Reference System of the project.<br>
 <h2>Syntax</h2>
 <p>map_y_max(composer_title, map_id)</p>
 <h2>Arguments</h2>
 <p>composer_title - is string. The title of the composer where the map is.<br>
 map_id - integer. The id of the map.</p>
 <h2>Example</h2>
 <p>map_y_max('my pretty map', 0) -> 12345.679</p>
 """
 composer_title = values[0]
 map_id = values[1]
 map_extent = map_bounds(composer_title, map_id)
 if map_extent:
  result = map_extent.yMaximum()
 else:
  result = None

 return result

As funções ficaram disponíveis no construtor de expressões na categoria “Python” (podia ter-lhe dado outro nome qualquer) e as descrições das funções são transformadas em textos de ajuda para fornecer ao utilizador informação de como utilizar as funções.

The functions became available to the expression builder in the “Python” category (could have been any other name) and the functions descriptions are formatted as help texts to provide the user all the information needed to use them.

Screenshot from 2014-09-09 15^%39^%19

Usando as funções recentemente criadas, foi fácil posicionar etiquetas  junto dos cantos do mapa com as coordenadas dos mesmos. Qualquer alteração à extensão do mapa, reflecte-se nas etiquetas, podendo por isso ser usadas convenientemente com a funcionalidade de atlas.

Using the created functions, it was now easy to put the corner coordinates in labels near the map corners. Any change to the map extents is reflected in the label, therefore quite useful to use with the atlas mode.

Screenshot from 2014-09-09 15^%40^%27

O resultado destas funções pode ser usado com outras. Na imagem seguinte apresenta-se uma expressão para apresentar as coordenadas de forma mais compacta.

The functions result can be used with other functions. In the following image there is a expression to show the coordinates in a more compact way.

Screenshot from 2014-09-09 15^%43^%55

Havia um senão… Para as funções ficarem disponíveis, seria necessário importá-las manualmente em cada utilização do QGIS. Algo que não era prático. Novamente com a ajuda do Nathan, fiquei a saber que podemos importar módulos Python no arranque do QGIS colocando na pasta .qgis2/python um ficheiro com o nome startup.py com os comandos de importação. Para o meu caso bastou o seguinte.

There was a setback… For the functions to become available, it was necessary to manually import them in each QGIS session. Not very practical. Again with Nathan’s help, I found out that it’s possible to import python modules at QGIS startup by putting a startup.py file with the import statements in the .qgis2/python folder. In my case this was enough.

import userfunctions

Conclusões | Conclusions

Fiquei bastante satisfeito com o resultado. A possibilidade do utilizador criar as usas próprias funções para usar em expressões vem mais uma vez demonstrar como é fácil personalizar e criar as minhas próprias ferramentas para QGIS. Já estou a matutar em mais aplicações para estar fantástica funcionalidade.

I was pretty satisfied with the end result. The ability to create your own functions in expressions demonstrates once more how easy it is to customize QGIS and create your own tools. I’m already thinking in more applications for this amazing functionality.

UT 9 - Qta da Peninha - Vegetação potencial

Os ficheiros Python com as funções criadas podem ser descarregados AQUI. Basta descompactar os dois ficheiros para a pasta .qgis2/python e reiniciar o QGIS, e as funções devem ficar disponíveis.

You can download the Python files with the functions HERE. Just unzip both files to the .qgis2/python folder, and restart QGIS, and the functions should become available.

Disclaimer: I’m not an English native speaker, therefor I apologize for any errors, and I will thanks any advice on how to improve the text.


Oh God my plugins! My precious QGIS plugins

tl;dr

The API had to change. We don't like breaking plugins. It makes us sad. We did it now to save pain in the future. You will like the new version better. Trust me.

What happened to my cheese?

When updating to QGIS 2.0 you might have noticed two things. (Apart from all the new awesome stuff!)

  1. All your settings have been set back to defaults
  2. Some of your plugins are gone, or missing in the installer.

Resetting of settings is caused by QGIS now storing its 2.0 settings in a different folder then we used for 1.8. In 1.8, all your plugins, etc, were stored in the ./qgis folder in your home directory, in 2.0 these are now stored in ./qgis2. The reason will become evident later. All user settings, the UI layout, database connections, etc, are now stored in a QGIS location. In windows this in the registry key HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\QGIS\QGIS2. So this explains why your settings are missing when you first load QGIS 2.0.

Why did we have to move the settings location?

Good question.

2.0 is very different from 1.8. There has been a lot of work to make this the best version we have ever made, new features, more bug fixes, a bigger dev team, and a even bigger community. Being the next major release we had to make some calls to remove some of the old code and features that were weighing us down. Features such as the old labelling engine, old symbol engine, the old vector API. Carrying old code and old out dated features into the future can sometimes really hurt a project and they have to be cut loose. Because of the massive amount of changes in 2.0 people needed to be able to run 2.0 and 1.8 on the same machine without causing any issues. If they both store settings in the same location this would have had bad results.

Why move the settings. Part 2

Moving the settings was also a result of having non backwards compatible plugins between 1.x and 2.x. If we kept both plugins in the same folder it just wouldn't work. You would install a 1.8 version of a plugin, I would update my plugin to 2.0, you then install the same plugin in 2.0, and now you 1.8 version is broken. Fun!. To avoid this we moved all QGIS 2.0 stuff into ./qgis2.

Why did my plugins break anyway. Why not just leave them be.

In 1.x we were using SIP v1. This meant the framework we used, PyQt, felt more like C++ then it did Python. If you are a Python developer then this isn't a very fun thing to deal with. In SIP v1 you need to tell PyQt, and our QGIS API, what to convert the type to. feature['mycolumn'].toInt() that is pretty gross. In V2 you can just do feature['mycolumn'] and SIP will auto convert the type for you. This makes our API feel more like Python and less like C++. There are other changes when using SIP V2 but you get the idea. Unfortunately SIP v1 and v2 do not work together so we couldn't make the code backwards compatible. This was also a forced change for us. Once we switch to Python 3 at some stage in the future V2 would be the default and we have to change then. The bright side of this change is most of the time you are removing code. Consider it a good time to go though your code, give it a bit of a polish, and remove anything that is no longer needed.

There was another major API change that needed to happen. Vector API update. In order to allow for multithreading in the future, and we all know everyone is looking forward to that, we needed to change how code can ask for features from a layer. The old method would never work in a multithreaded structure and had to go.

What can I do if I need a plugin?

Having a plugin missing from the plugin installer when you really need it can be a bit of a pain. Plugin authors are working hard to update there plugins. I approve about two a day into the plugin repository. While most plugins might be updated at some stage. There are some things that you can do if you need a plugin update to work with 2.0.

  1. Email the author of the plugin to see where they are at with the update

  2. Email the author and offer your help to update the plugin. Remember a lot of plugins are written by volunteers who just need the plugin to get their work done and wanted to share it with everyone.

  3. If the author has no intention of updating the plugin, or can't be contacted. You are free to update you local copy and offer it back to the community as the updated copy. If you are going to upload it back to the plugin repository please try to contact the author and seek permission first. I will be watching for copies of plugins to make sure we don't end up with 10 versions of the same plugin. The GPL allows for you to modify and share your updated version but it's nice to keep the original author in the loop. If the author no longer wants to maintain the plugin and you are able to then contact me and I will make you the owner of the plugin. Overall be nice not evil, we are all friends here.

  4. If you don't have, or know someone with, the skills to update the plugin. You can contact a developer to help update the plugin for you. Companies like mine, or Faunalia, or a whole range of other open source devs, can normally be contracted to update a plugin if needed.

Moving forward

We like the new API. It makes the Python side of QGIS much cleaner. There is still more work to do, it's never ending, but this is a good step. We don't like breaking plugins, but breaking a few now is better then breaking heaps as the popularity of QGIS continues to grow.

Oh God my plugins! My precious QGIS plugins

tl;dr

The API had to change. We don't like breaking plugins. It makes us sad. We did it now to save pain in the future. You will like the new version better. Trust me.

What happened to my cheese?

When updating to QGIS 2.0 you might have noticed two things. (Apart from all the new awesome stuff!)

  1. All your settings have been set back to defaults
  2. Some of your plugins are gone, or missing in the installer.

Resetting of settings is caused by QGIS now storing its 2.0 settings in a different folder then we used for 1.8. In 1.8, all your plugins, etc, were stored in the ./qgis folder in your home directory, in 2.0 these are now stored in ./qgis2. The reason will become evident later. All user settings, the UI layout, database connections, etc, are now stored in a QGIS location. In windows this in the registry key HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\QGIS\QGIS2. So this explains why your settings are missing when you first load QGIS 2.0.

Why did we have to move the settings location?

Good question.

2.0 is very different from 1.8. There has been a lot of work to make this the best version we have ever made, new features, more bug fixes, a bigger dev team, and a even bigger community. Being the next major release we had to make some calls to remove some of the old code and features that were weighing us down. Features such as the old labelling engine, old symbol engine, the old vector API. Carrying old code and old out dated features into the future can sometimes really hurt a project and they have to be cut loose. Because of the massive amount of changes in 2.0 people needed to be able to run 2.0 and 1.8 on the same machine without causing any issues. If they both store settings in the same location this would have had bad results.

Why move the settings. Part 2

Moving the settings was also a result of having non backwards compatible plugins between 1.x and 2.x. If we kept both plugins in the same folder it just wouldn't work. You would install a 1.8 version of a plugin, I would update my plugin to 2.0, you then install the same plugin in 2.0, and now you 1.8 version is broken. Fun!. To avoid this we moved all QGIS 2.0 stuff into ./qgis2.

Why did my plugins break anyway. Why not just leave them be.

In 1.x we were using SIP v1. This meant the framework we used, PyQt, felt more like C++ then it did Python. If you are a Python developer then this isn't a very fun thing to deal with. In SIP v1 you need to tell PyQt, and our QGIS API, what to convert the type to. feature['mycolumn'].toInt() that is pretty gross. In V2 you can just do feature['mycolumn'] and SIP will auto convert the type for you. This makes our API feel more like Python and less like C++. There are other changes when using SIP V2 but you get the idea. Unfortunately SIP v1 and v2 do not work together so we couldn't make the code backwards compatible. This was also a forced change for us. Once we switch to Python 3 at some stage in the future V2 would be the default and we have to change then. The bright side of this change is most of the time you are removing code. Consider it a good time to go though your code, give it a bit of a polish, and remove anything that is no longer needed.

There was another major API change that needed to happen. Vector API update. In order to allow for multithreading in the future, and we all know everyone is looking forward to that, we needed to change how code can ask for features from a layer. The old method would never work in a multithreaded structure and had to go.

What can I do if I need a plugin?

Having a plugin missing from the plugin installer when you really need it can be a bit of a pain. Plugin authors are working hard to update there plugins. I approve about two a day into the plugin repository. While most plugins might be updated at some stage. There are some things that you can do if you need a plugin update to work with 2.0.

  1. Email the author of the plugin to see where they are at with the update

  2. Email the author and offer your help to update the plugin. Remember a lot of plugins are written by volunteers who just need the plugin to get their work done and wanted to share it with everyone.

  3. If the author has no intention of updating the plugin, or can't be contacted. You are free to update you local copy and offer it back to the community as the updated copy. If you are going to upload it back to the plugin repository please try to contact the author and seek permission first. I will be watching for copies of plugins to make sure we don't end up with 10 versions of the same plugin. The GPL allows for you to modify and share your updated version but it's nice to keep the original author in the loop. If the author no longer wants to maintain the plugin and you are able to then contact me and I will make you the owner of the plugin. Overall be nice not evil, we are all friends here.

  4. If you don't have, or know someone with, the skills to update the plugin. You can contact a developer to help update the plugin for you. Companies like mine, or Faunalia, or a whole range of other open source devs, can normally be contracted to update a plugin if needed.

Moving forward

We like the new API. It makes the Python side of QGIS much cleaner. There is still more work to do, it's never ending, but this is a good step. We don't like breaking plugins, but breaking a few now is better then breaking heaps as the popularity of QGIS continues to grow.

GRASS GIS 6.4.3RC4 released

Fourth (and last) release candidate of GRASS GIS 6.4.3 with improvements and stability fixes
A fourth release candidate of GRASS GIS 6.4.3 is now available.

Source code download:

Binaries download:

To get the GRASS GIS 6.4.3RC4 source code directly from SVN:
 svn checkout http://svn.osgeo.org/grass/grass/tags/release_20130710_grass_6_4_3RC4

Key improvements of this release include some new functionality (assistance for topologically unclean vector data), fixes in the vector network modules, fixes for the wxPython based portable graphical interface (attribute table management, wxNVIZ, and Cartographic Composer), fixes in the location wizard for Datum transform selection and support for PROJ.4 version 4.8.0, improvements for selecting the Python version to be used, enhanced portability for MS-Windows (native support, fixes in case of missing system DLLs), and more translations (esp. Romanian).

See also our detailed announcement:
 http://trac.osgeo.org/grass/wiki/Release/6.4.3RC4-News

First time users should explore the first steps tutorial after installation.

Release candidate management at
http://trac.osgeo.org/grass/wiki/Grass6Planning

Please join us in testing this release candidate for the final release.

Consider to donate pizza or beer for the upcoming GRASS GIS Community Sprint in Prague:
Thanks to all contributors!

Python support even closer

anybody has a hint?

Getting closer to taming the snake

very geeky but I have to post this:

D/Qt (27512): src/python/qgspythonutilsimpl.cpp: 188: (runString) COMAND OK: import sys
D/Qt (27512): src/python/qgspythonutilsimpl.cpp: 188: (runString) COMAND OK: import os
D/Qt (27512): src/python/qgspythonutilsimpl.cpp: 188: (runString) COMAND OK: sys.path = ["/data/data/org.qgis.qgis/files/share/python","/data/data/org.qgis.qgis/files//python","/data/data/org.qgis.qgis/files//python" + "/plugins","/data/data/org.qgis.qgis/files/share/python/plugins"] + sys.path
D/Qt (27512): src/python/qgspythonutilsimpl.cpp: 91: (initPython) newpaths: "/data/data/org.qgis.qgis/files/share/python","/data/data/org.qgis.qgis/files//python","/data/data/org.qgis.qgis/files//python" + "/plugins","/data/data/org.qgis.qgis/files/share/python/plugins"
D/Qt (27512): src/python/qgspythonutilsimpl.cpp: 188: (runString) COMAND OK: from sip import wrapinstance, unwrapinstance
D/Qt (27512): src/core/qgsmessagelog.cpp: 45: (logMessage) 2013-05-21T01:57:20 [0] Python support ENABLED :-)

imageimage

Python support in qgis is getting there

Never been so close,  but it took the heck out of me… now lets see if after 4 days of continuous fiddling around I manage to tame the snake
image

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