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Sat Sep 23 22:05:14 2017

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QGIS Grant Programme #2 Results

We are extremely pleased to announce the winning proposals for our 2017 QGIS.ORG grant programme. Funding for the programme was sourced by you, our project donors and sponsorsNote: For more context surrounding our grant programme, please see:

Our intent with the QGIS.ORG Grant Programme is to support work from community that would typically not be funded by client/contractor agreements, and that contributes to the broadest possible swathe of our community by providing cross-cutting, foundational improvements to the QGIS Project.

Voting to select the successful projects was carried out by our QGIS Voting Membership. Each voting member was allowed to select up to 6 of the 13 submitted proposals by means of a ranked selection form. The full list of votes are available here (on the first sheet). The second sheet contains the calculations used to determine the winner (for full transparency). The table below summarizes the voting tallies for the proposals:

Screen Shot 2017-04-30 at 3.23.08 PM

A couple of extra notes about the voting process:

  • The PSC has an ongoing program to fund documentation so elected to fund the processing documentation work separately from the grant programme (note *1).
  • Voting was carried out based on the technical merits of the proposals and the competency of the applicants to execute on these proposals.
  • No restrictions were in place in terms of how many proposals could be submitted per person / organization, or how many proposals could be awarded to each proposing person / organization.
  • Because of the importance of having good packaging systems on each of the three major platforms, the PSC elected to additionally fund the work on MacOS bundling scripts (note *2).
  • Although the budget for the grant programme was €20,000.00, the total amount for the four winning proposals is €19,800.00, with an additional €5, 800.00 being made available to support the processing work and and MacOS packaging work.
  • Voting was ‘blind’ (voters could not see the existing votes that had been placed).

We had great participation in the voting process. Of the 27 voting members, 23 registered their votes.

Screen Shot 2017-04-20 at 4.11.45 PM
On behalf of the QGIS.ORG project, I would really like to thank everyone who submitted proposals for this call. There were many interesting proposals that I believe would be of great benefit to QGIS and I hope others perusing the proposals list will use their initiative and funding interesting proposals independently if they can.

Below you can find the detailed proposals of the successful applications – we look forward to seeing the results of their work land in the code base soon!

Details of the approved grant proposals


9 ADD CONSISTENCY TO UI CONTROLS

Proposer: Nyall Dawson

Amount: €1800

Details: Across the QGIS UI, numerous inconsistencies exist in the way different properties like opacity and rotation are exposed to users. These inconsistencies make QGIS harder to use, as behavior from one dialog differs to the behavior in another dialog. Some examples of this include:

  • Rotation of labels is done in the opposite direction in labeling to symbology. Accordingly, an equal rotation value will result in different rotation between labels and symbols.
  • Scales are inconsistently presented, with use of both the scale numerator and denominator in different dialogs. “Minimum” and “Maximum” scales also vary between dialogs, with some dialogs using “minimum” scale as the largest scale and some using “minimum” as the smallest scale. The labeling scale based visibility controls are the biggest offenders here.
  • Controls vary between specifying “opacity”, “transparency” and “alpha”. While these all have similar results, users must adopt values to map “opacity” to “transparency” in different dialogs. This is further compounded by different ranges used for each (eg 0-100%, or 0-255).

Due to the usual API freeze, it has not been possible to fix these discrepancies. The current API break introduced with version 3.0 allow a window for addressing these issues and standardizing behavior and API.

Despite the benefits in providing a consistent UI, the work involved in standardizing is fiddly (careful attention must be paid to not breaking existing projects) and repetitive, and unlikely to be undertaken by developers on a volunteer basis.  Furthermore it is highly unlikely that a commercial organisation could justify sponsoring UI standardisation efforts. Without grant funding it is unlikely that these issues will be addressed during the 3.0 development cycle, and the inconsistencies would remain for the lifetime of QGIS 3.x.

In this proposal I will:

  • convert all “transparency” controls to “opacity” controls, and consult with the community to determine the ideal value range presented (0-100% or 0-255) before making all opacity controls use the same range.
  • Ensure that rotation always operates in the same direction.
  • Fix the labeling scale ranges to use the same scale range definitions as layer visibility
  • As much as possible, automatically upgrade existing projects so that they open in QGIS 3.0 without any loss of transparency/rotation/scale settings
  • (As much as possible without large refactoring), adapt the PyQGIS API so for consistent naming and use of opacity/rotation and scale setting/getting methods. Making the API consistent makes scripting QGIS and writing plugins easier.

This proposal relates to the issues described at:

History: No work has currently been undertaken in this regard.

Qualifications: I am currently one of the most active QGIS developers, with a long history of quality contributions to the project. I’m passionate about seeing QGIS 3.0 address these kinds of long standing UI issues which detract from QGIS’ otherwise professional image and ease of use.

Implementation Plan:  The work will be undertaken prior to the QGIS 3.0 feature freeze period.

Proposal Link:


3 EXTEND UNIT TEST COVERAGE FOR GEOMETRY CLASSES

Proposer: Nyall Dawson

Amount: €2000

Details: Since QGIS 2.8, there has been an increased focused on creation of quality automated regression (“unit”) tests designed to flag issues in code before the code is introduced to the QGIS codebase. The increase in stability of recent QGIS versions can be directly attributed to this growth in unit testing. Despite this, many areas of the QGIS codebase remain with little or no unit test coverage.

One critical area which has insufficient unit tests is the geometry classes. The geometry classes form the basis of all geometry interpretation, algorithms, and rendering within QGIS. In order to provide stable QGIS releases, it is crucial that these fundamental classes are rock-solid, efficient, and do not suffer regressions between releases.

Some years ago (shortly after the introduction of the new geometry engine, in which support for Z/M values and curved geometries was added) I added full test coverage for the Point and Linestring classes, and partial coverage for the Polygon class. Unfortunately, writing geometry tests is tricky and time consuming. There’s many corner cases with unusual or invalid geometries which need to be tested. The time commitment required prevented me from writing additional tests, and to date the remaining classes (including multi geometries and all curved geometry types) have little or no test coverage.

This proposal covers writing additional unit tests to cover all the remaining geometry classes.

It is important to note that unit tests do NOT ensure bug free software. Unit tests only protect existing logic and avoid regressions when the covered parts of the code base are changed in future releases. Despite this disclaimer, the process of creating unit tests usually stress-tests existing code and in itself CAN reveal existing bugs. This was certainly the case when the existing tests for Point and Linestring classes were added – creation of the tests alone resulted in many fixed bugs and stabler Point and Linestring geometry handling.

History: This work would continue on from work I begun a number of years ago to provide 100% unit test coverage for the base geometry classes.

Qualifications: I have a long history of quality contributions to the QGIS project, and am currently one of the most prolific committers to the QGIS codebase. I have a long history with adding unit tests to QGIS and advocating for their increased usage amongst developers.

Implementation Plan: This work would be targeted to the QGIS 3.0 release, and would be committed to the codebase prior to the feature freeze/bug fixing period leading up to the 3.0 release.

Proposal Link:


8 QGIS 3D

Proposer: Martin Dobias

Amount: €10000

Details: I would like to propose a project that introduces 3D rendering capabilities in QGIS.
To summarize the planned work, the following features can be expected:

  • 2D view of map canvas rendered on the graphics hardware (GPU) allowing smooth zooming and panning of map view
  • 3D perspective view of the map
  • generation of 3D terrain model from DEM (digital elevation model) layers
  • map layers rendered as a texture on top of the 3D terrain
  • support for true 3D rendering of vector layers rather than having just flat appearance
  • map view widget that is dockable in the main window and synchronized with the main map canvas
  • support for picking (identification) of objects in 3D view and X/Y/Z coordinate display
  • support for 3D map view in map composer

The overall target is to introduce an extensible framework for 3D map view within QGIS, so that in the future developers can add various 3D rendering techniques for map data, using custom geometries and materials (which may involve writing own vertex/fragment shaders), possibly even allowing multi-pass rendering for advanced effects (e.g. to render shadows cast by buildings with a particular sun position).
3D support in QGIS is not only about adding the extra dimension to the rendering: it is also about making it possible to use graphics hardware for rendering of map in 2D – making map browsing even more pleasant and faster at the same time. Rendering 2D maps with OpenGL also opens the door to various new graphical effects that would be otherwise very expensive

to achieve by using just CPU for map rendering.
This proposal does not assume addition of new geometry types like polyhedral surface (with read support for those) into QGIS – the aim of the work is to get 3D rendering engine running and new geometry types may be added at some point later.

State of the art

QGIS features very good 2D rendering capabilities, however its 3D support has been very limited. Prior work on 3D in QGIS includes:

  • Globe plugin – a C++ plugin developed by Matthias Kuhn and Sourcepole based on OpenSceneGraph and osgEarth libraries. OpenSceneGraph is a generic toolkit that provides higher-level abstraction on top of OpenGL, making it easier to develop 3D applications than directly using low-level OpenGL interfaces.OsgEarth project then builds on top of OpenSceneGraph and provides a toolkit for working with geographical data: it has a terrain engine that combines elevation layers into a terrain, applies textures from “image” layers and adds feature layers with true 3D objects.The plugin acts as a bridge from QGIS environment and feeds scene data into osgEarth to do the 3D rendering.
  • Qgis2threejs plugin – a Python plugin developed by Minoru Akagi. It is able to export QGIS project (with various configuration options) into a HTML page that uses three.js library to render map in 3D within web browser using WebGL.
  • Horao – developed by Oslandia. It is a standalone 3D viewer based on OpenSceneGraph that may be controlled by a QGIS plugin to display map from QGIS in 3D environment. It has explicit support for true 3D geometries in PostGIS.

While these projects solve some use cases for 3D rendering of map data, each of them have their own limitations. For example, osgEarth library used by Globe plugin has its own data access and rendering of vector features implementation, duplicating QGIS code and not having parity in their capabilities. Moreover it has been difficult over time to keep the build working on all platforms supported by QGIS. The main limitation of Qgis2threejs plugin is the fact that the 3D view is exported to web browser, so the user cannot use benefits of having 3D view tightly integrated with the rest of QGIS. The fact that Horao has a standalone viewer

application results in similar limitations as when using Qgis2threejs (although it has some degree of integration with QGIS application).

Proposed approach
Now that QGIS 3.0 is based on Qt5, we can use some of the great new functionality added recent releases of Qt5. In version 5.5, a new framework for working 3D graphics has been introduced and every major Qt5 release since has been adding more functionality, improving performance, compatibility and stability. The 3D support nicely integrates with the rest of the Qt framework, providing a familiar API and at the same time staying very generic and highly efficient.
The 3D framework provides high level abstractions just like other libraries (e.g. OpenSceneGraph, three.js). 3D scene is built with nodes (called entities) with various components (e.g. transformation, mesh, material).
The idea is to build 3D support in QGIS on top of the Qt 3D framework. From my initial tests of the framework this looks feasible and it will allow us to stick with Qt APIs without requiring extra dependencies.
The work can be divided into the following chunks of work:

  1. Rendering engine core: develop a framework that will do rendering of the map scene in 3D. The engine will have the responsibility of processing raster layers with elevation into a mesh geometry and texturing the mesh with map images rendered by the existing QGIS 2D rendering engine. The engine will support levels of detail (LOD) and tiling in order to be able to display high-resolution data in real time without having to load all the data into memory at the time of scene creation (which may be prohibitively expensive with more complex layers). 3D scene will be dynamically updated as user browses the map, keeping the amount of rendered triangles low while appropriate quality of the terrain for given zoom level.

All of the processing needs to be done in the background, so the user may freely browse the map and the scene will be continuously updated with data (changing between higher/lower detail when zooming, loading more data when moving map).

  1. Handling of user input: controller for camera that will make the camera fly on top of the map. Support for picking will be added to allow identification of objects in the map and display of coordinates at the mouse position.
  1. Integration with QGIS environment: dockable 3D map widget for the main window, synchronization with 2D map canvas, support for printing of 3D views in map compositions.
  1. Advanced 3D rendering techniques: interface that will allow adding new methods for data visualization in 3D and exploration of methods for rendering. By default map layers will be rendered into map image with the existing 2D map renderer – this interface will allow map layers to instead have 3D renderer associated which will provide entities with custom meshes and materials. As a result we will be able to achieve true 3D appearance of objects (e.g. point clouds, trees as 3D models, tesselation of polygons, buildings with extruded geometry and custom texture). Implementation of the advanced techniques is a task with nearly unlimited scope, so the idea is to develop a suitable interface and as the time will allow, implement some techniques.

History: For this proposal I have studied various sources:

  • looked into existing 3D viewer projects related to QGIS
  • explored Qt 3D framework
  • researched some academic papers regarding terrain generation and vector data display

As a proof of concept, I have created a simple prototype in C++ using Qt 3D framework. It displays aerial imagery on top of a terrain model created from a raster layer (DEM) and allows simple camera control. The code is available here: https://github.com/wonder-sk/qgis3d

Qualifications: I have been a core QGIS developer for more than 10 years and I have a very good knowledge of QGIS codebase, especially the existing 2D map rendering pipeline.
Previously when working at the university, on a project for stereo matching (creation of point cloud out of a pair of images) I worked on visualization of 3D data using OpenGL.
Implementation Plan: The plan is to work on the project between May and July 2017. As of now, the plan for QGIS releases (according to the mail from Paolo) is that QGIS 3.0 will have feature freeze in July 2017 and final release in September 2017. If nothing changes in the QGIS release schedule in meanwhile, the 3D support could be integrated into QGIS master branch before the feature freeze and thus released in QGIS 3.0.
If the project would be accepted, the first step will be to develop a prototype of the 3D rendering engine, then prepare a more detailed architecture proposal as a QEP and continue the implementation once the QEP gets accepted by the community. The work progress should be available on a branch in GitHub for anyone interested.
Proposal Link: https://github.com/wonder-sk/qgis3d



6 PROCESSING ALGORITHM DOCUMENTATION

Proposers: Matteo Ghetta, Alexander Bruy

Amount: €4000

Details: This proposal aims to improve the existing Processing algorithms documentation. With the pull request https://github.com/qgis/QGIS/pull/3911 it is possible to add external links for the documentation (both local and remotes). However the effective use of the pull request is not yet included in Processing.

With this proposal the existing code will be incorporated in Processing, allowing to have a Short Help tab (the existing one on the right of the Processing algorithm window) and a Long Help tab (next to the Log tab).

The Short Help tab will be collapsible in order to have a bigger window for the algorithm parameters, while the Long Help tab will point to the on-line existing documentation of Processing for each algorithm (http://docs.qgis.org/testing/en/docs/user_manual/processing_algs/index.html).

The default link of the on-line documentation will be added in the QGIS Settings (thanks to the pull request already merged) in order to have the standard documentation visible but to let the user the choice to overwrite it and load custom paths.

In addition to the code part, this proposal aims also to document the GDAL/OGR provider and the QGIS core algorithms. Existing documentation will be reviewed and pictures will be added when useful, while for algorithm not yet documented, the help will be written from scratch with description and additional pictures.

Currently there are:

  • 49 GDAL/OGR total algorithms, 35 to enhance with pictures, 14 to write from scratch
  • 154 QGIS algorithms, 38 to enhance, 116 to write from scratch

This means a total of 73 algorithm to enhance and 130 to write from scratch.

History: The pull request https://github.com/qgis/QGIS/pull/3911 is already merged and it is worth to make it effective to have nice, rich and translatable documentation for the Processing algorithms.

Qualifications: Matteo Ghetta: working since the release 2.0 on the documentation and made several improvements and pull request to both documentation and Processing code.

Alexander Bruy: core developer since 2010, co-maintainer of the QGIS Processing framework.

Implementation Plan: The code and the documentation will be ready for the QGIS 3 release.

Proposal Link:


5 IMPROVE DEEP RELATIONS WITH POSTGRES EDITING

Proposer: Régis Haubourg

Amount: €6000

Details: QGIS has reached a mature level and offers now a very good framework to create professional applications. One of the main reasons is that QGIS is a very strong client for spatial databases, and in particular with PostgreSQL and postGIS for which it was initially created.

Since version 2.14, QGIS offers the not-so-well-known ability to handle transaction groups, which means it can instantly evaluate triggers on database side, and refresh all layers in the same transaction. This is a big win for usability, but some drawbacks glitches remain, such as the lack of the undo/redo edit buffer, a very raw way of saving (ie quitting edition session) or having the legend cluttered by so many edit symbols (a pen symbol). Current proposal is to go a step beyond to make QGIS even better for PostgreSQL by achieving the following targets:

1 Restore an undo /redo feature by taking advantage of PostgreSQL. If possible we will try to take advantage of PostgreSQL named Savepoints.

2 Allow to have some layers not switching to edit mode in QGIS,  even if they belong to the same connection. These layers will still benefit from the instant refresh, but won’t clutter the legend with the edit pen symbol everywhere, nor risk to load QGIS snapping cache for nothing. A UI for those settings could be an evolution of the current “identify layer” list in the project properties.

3 We would like to submit a mechanism to allow converting error messages raised by the provider, like a RAISE from postgres, into custom user oriented message. Say for instance, instead of a “provider error – duplicate key for… “, QGIS project could be tuned to display first “You tried to insert a feature using the same identifier as another one”.

The error message list and regexp rules would be optionally stored in qgis project or read from a datasource table (for instance when error messages rewrites are shared by other applications). The original error message would be still avaiblable by expanding the details of the messageBar and in the general message log.

4 Cherry on cake point, we wish to have QGIS take advantage of PostgreSQL NOTIFY signals to trigger behavior in QGIS when something changes in the database (see https://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.5/static/sql-notify.html) . A first implementation proposal is to allow a map canvas refresh, but we can imagine really dynamic applications driven by the database events by converting NOTIFY messages into QGIS signals (oh yeah!).

History: In our team, we already use transaction groups for production tools and that is much appreciated. We already use some python logic to catch error message and convert them to more user oriented ones. We frequently develop applications where QGIS is linked with heavy database containing most of the intelligence. Having a really interactive edition process, speaking the same langage as average users, and being able to be triggered from database process will unleashed many possible applications.

Qualifications: Oslandia has three QGIS developers, two of them being core comiters and high  skills with Postgres and Postgis (core comiter too). We believe that developing using thick databases is a major strength of QGIS, and we have great fun getting involved in that area of the code 😉

Implementation Plan:  We currently are quite involved in QGIS 3 server refactoring and major changes such as Auxiliary Storage for project or core solutions for label connectors. We also are involved in applications build on top of QGIS for Water management like QWAT or QGEP. Such changes would benefit immediatly to those project. Our target is to provide those improvements with all necessary unit tests for 3.0 release.

Proposal Link: coming soon..


 

13 UPDATE MACOS CMAKE BUNDLING SCRIPTS

 

Proposer: Larry Shaffer

 

Amount: €1800

 

Details: Currently, the macOS bundling routines (to create a self-contained QGIS.app application) in CMake scripts where created by William Kyngsburye many years ago. Since then, CMake has added many features for bundling, e.g. BundleUtilities ( https://cmake.org/cmake/help/v3.0/module/BundleUtilities.html), that handle similar functionality to what has been arduously maintained in the CMake scripts. While the current setup does function, it is quite antiquated and adding any new QGIS dependencies to be bundled is an error-prone ordeal. I propose to fully update the bundling routines to leverage modern CMake capabilities, since building on macOS usually uses the latest CMake versions. Once completed, anyone with appropriate dependencies should be able to produce a production-ready QGIS.app bundle, including the QGIS project itself.

 

History: I will first build upon the existing work to ensure there is a minimal bundled QGIS.app, then completely refactor the same functionality using a modern CMake code workflow.

 

Qualifications: I have extensive knowledge in CMake and frequently utilize it in my work for my employer, Boundless Spatial. I have already completed a fully bundled QGIS.app distribution by my employer (similar to the first phase of the proposed work here), though Boundless now uses a different installation approach. I have been working for years on the OSGeo4Mac project in anticipation of producing better CMake bundling routines, to ensure the QGIS project can independently produce its own macOS distributions.

 

Implementation Plan: Basic work will follow these steps:

  • Append minimal bundling to existing CMake setup, so there is a least a functioning bundling routine, regardless of whether the proposed work is accomplished in time for the major next release.
  • Ensure the QGIS.app bundle is code-signed
  • Create a new methodology, based upon CMake’s BundlesUtilities, *in-line* next to the existing CMake routines, so both can be used, until there is a valid replacement.
  • Focus on minimal bundling, then add GRASS
  • Continue extending bundling routines to include major Processing providers, e.g. OTB, Saga, TauDEM, etc.
  • Ensure new method’s QGIS.app is properly code-signed
  • Enable bundling on Travis CI infrastructure, via Travis’ cron jobs, thereby adding the capability for the QGIS project to produce fully bundled nightlies of macOS builds.
  • Once new method represents a full replacement, old method will be removed, not just deprecated

 

Intended completion is in time for QGIS 3.0 release and packaging efforts.

 

Since the new method does not affect any existing code, as soon as useable functionality is achieved, it will be merged directly into master, then further code committed as work progresses.

Proposal Link: None at this time. Should I consider a QEP? Not many developers beyond the few existing packagers and experimenters would be involved. I would prefer to write a blog post after the work is completed, though post to the QGIS dev mailing list the intention to do the work, if this proposal is granted.


Update on the QGIS Grant Applications

In February this year, we put out a call for applications for the second (yay!) round of the QGIS grant programme. The intent of the programme is to leverage donor and sponsor funding in order to support community members with great ideas to improve the underlying infrastructure of the QGIS project and code base.

We have had a really great response to the call for applications (detailed list of applications is here for your reading pleasure – 231KB download).

Given that we have 13 proposals (down 7 from our last call) and only 20,000 Euros to disburse, the QGIS voting members will need to make some tough, pragmatic choices.The voting for the grant proposals ends at the mid April 2017, and we plan to announce the successful candidates soon after that. The PSC will arbitrate in the case of a dead heat or the proposal amounts of the top voted proposals not adding up to our funding target.

Although the number of proposals submitted is down from last year, the quality and utility of the proposals this year is really top notch and it is sad to know that we will not be able to fun them all through the grant programme. If you have the wherewithal to further support some of the grant proposals that did not make the cut, or the QGIS 3.0 effort in general, please get into contact with our treasurer, Andreas Neumann (finance [at] qgis.org) or head over to our sponsorship or donations page to support their work!

Lastly, I appeal to those QGIS Voting Members who have not yet cast their votes to check your email and head over to the voting form to cast your vote!


QGIS Grants #2: Call for Grant Proposals 2017

Dear QGIS Community

Last year we held our first ever call for Grant Proposals and it was a great success. If you are an early adopter using QGIS 3.0 preview builds, you can already try out some of the new capabilities that have arrived in QGIS thanks to these grants.

We are very pleased to announce the second round of Grants is now available to QGIS Contributors. The deadline for this round is Sunday, 19 March 2017. All the details for the Grant are described in the application form, and for more context we encourage you to also read these articles:

We look forward to seeing all your great ideas about how to improve QGIS!

Tim Sutton

QGIS Project Chair


Winning QGIS Grant Proposals for 2016

We are extremely pleased to announce the winning proposals for our 2016 QGIS.ORG grant programme. Funding for the programme was sourced by you, our project donors and sponsorsNote: For more context surrounding our grant programme, please see:

Our intent with the QGIS.ORG Grant Programme is to support work from community that would typically not be funded by client/contractor agreements, and that contributes to the broadest possible swathe of our community by providing cross-cutting, foundational improvements to the QGIS Project.

Voting to select the successful projects was carried out by our QGIS Voting Membership. Each voting member was allowed to select up to 6 of the 18 submitted proposals by means of a ranked selection form. The full list of votes are available here (on the first sheet). The second sheet contains the calculations used to determine the winner (for full transparency). The table below summarizes the voting tallies for those proposals that received one or more votes, along with brief notes on the methodology used:

screen-shot-2016-10-04-at-11-02-38-pm

A couple of extra notes about the voting process:

  • Voting was carried out based on the technical merits of the proposals and the competency of the applicants to execute on these proposals.
  • No restrictions were in place in terms of how many proposals could be submitted per person / organization, or how many proposals could be awarded to each proposing person / organization.
  • Although the budget for the grant programme was €20,000.00, the total amount for the three winning proposals is €20,500.00 – an additional €500.00 was made available by the PSC towards the grant programme to accommodate this.
  • Voting was ‘blind’ (voters could not see the existing votes that had been placed).

As mentioned in our previous blog post about this selection process, this is the first time that we have asked our newly formed group of QGIS Voting Members to vote. It is extremely gratifying to see such enthusiastic participation in the voting process. Of the 27 voting members, 24 registered their votes. There was one late submission that unfortunately had to be excluded, and 2 non-votes.

screen-shot-2016-10-03-at-2-58-20-pm
On behalf of the QGIS.ORG project, I would really like to thank everyone who submitted proposals for this call. There were many interesting proposals that I believe would be of great benefit to QGIS and I hope others perusing the proposals list will use their initiative and funding interesting proposals independently if they can.

Below you can find the detailed proposals of the successful applications – we look forward to seeing the results of their work land in the code base soon!

 

Details of the approved grant proposals


Implement a flexible properties framework in QGIS (Nyall Dawson) – €10,000

 

Details: I am applying for a QGIS grant to cover the implementation of a flexible “properties framework” for QGIS. I honestly believe that implementation of this framework will unlock cartographic power in QGIS well beyond anything that is currently possible in any of the desktop or web based mapping applications.

I propose to implement a system of managing and evaluating properties for generic objects within QGIS. Properties include all settings relating to symbology, such as a line marker’s width, color, or offset, label settings (eg font size, color, shadow opacity, etc), diagram properties (colors, size, etc) and composer item settings (position, rotation, frame size and color, etc). While currently many of the properties can be set to use “data defined overrides”, the properties framework will extend these capabilities by making them both more flexible and easier to use.

This proposal is being driven by a number of factors:

1. To avoid the current multiple duplicate code paths involving storage, retrieval and evaluation of data defined properties and to make it easier to add data defined support to more things (eg diagrams) without incurring even more duplicate code. Currently labeling, symbology and composer all have their own methods for handling data defined properties, which makes maintenance of data defined code very difficult.

2. To allow creation of other property types besides the current “data defined” (ie bound to field value or expression result) property, eg time based properties for a future in-built animation framework.

3. To avoid the complexity of requiring users to write their own expressions to map values to colors, sizes, etc and apply scaling functions to these, and instead expose these to users in an interactive, flexible way. Think Mapbox studio’s approach to zoom level styling (https://cloud.githubusercontent.com/assets/1829991/17850412/6a0f285e-68a0-11e6-8719-cdf74afd061d.jpg), but available for all property types. Eg data defined values can be set to preset ease in/ease out curves, or manually edited curves through an interactive GUI.

4. Enable the possibility of having live project wide colors. Ie a color palette could be created in the project properties, and color based properties “bound” to these colors. Altering the color would then automatically update every property which was bound to this preset color. This also brings the possibility of “color themes” for maps, eg binding properties to a predefined color types such as “highlights”, “background features”, etc, and then interactively changing all these color bound properties by applying a color theme to the project.

5. To allow a system of inherited and overridden properties. Eg QGIS default label font overridden by a project default font and finally overridden by label font setting. The proposed composer rewrite (layouts work) would use this property inheritance to bind layout item properties to a dynamic template. Changes in the template would be reflected in all linked layouts, but individual items could overwrite the inherited properties as required. Layout item properties could then be set globally (eg, font size), per project (eg font family), via a “master template” and finally individually per layout item.

6. The labelling engine has a need for predefined label styles. Label properties could be set globally, per project, via a predefined style, or overridden for a particular layer.

Technical details regarding this proposal are available in QEP 22 (https://github.com/qgis/QGIS-Enhancement-Proposals/issues/38).

I am seeking funding to:

1. Implement the core functionality for the properties framework
2. Port symbology, labeling and diagrams to the framework, and enable data definable control of all appropriate diagram settings (currently diagrams have a very limited data defined control available)
3. Implement the GUI for the property framework, including:
– a widget for controlling property behaviour
– interactive widgets for size and color properties (which have been designed to work inside 2.16’s live layer styling dock)
– interactive widgets for setting the “easing” for properties, with choices of preset ease in/out methods + an interactive curve editor for manual control

If funds are remaining following these items, I will undertake (in order of priority):

4. Bound project colors
5. Begin work on labeling styles

History: Because I believe so firmly that this framework is required within QGIS, I have been building toward this work through numerous hours of development over the previous 2 years of QGIS releases. There were a number of prerequisite changes required first, such as the implementation of expression contexts. An initial PR (https://github.com/qgis/QGIS/pull/2857) for the properties framework was filed in May 2016, which includes some of the core parts of this proposal. Changes were required based on feedback from that PR , however to date all work on this has been on a volunteer, unsponsored basis and unfortunately I am no longer able to complete such large scale changes as are required by this proposal without funding. Aside from the changes required from the initial PR, significant work remains in implementing GUI, unit tests, and porting symbology and labeling to the new framework.

Qualifications: I have an extensive history of large-scale contributions to QGIS since 2013 and a proven track record for writing polished UI with extensive unit testing. I’m passionate about QGIS, being a daily GIS user and strongly believe that this framework is required to take QGIS to the next level of cartographic abilities.

Implementation Plan: Due to the extensive refactoring and API changes which are required for implementing the properties framework, this work MUST be done in the QGIS 3.0 timeline. If it is not completed during the 3.0 API break period, the amount of work and cost required would substantially increase, and numerous methods across the symbology, labeling and diagrams API would be deprecated. Accordingly this work will be conducted during the QGIS 3.0 timeline, and for greatest testing I would aim to complete the work ASAP (likely complete by late October). Due to the changes required this work would NOT be suitable to backporting to the >= 2.18 branch and will be targeted at QGIS 3.0 only.

Proposal Link:  A QEP detailing technical implemention is available at: https://github.com/qgis/QGIS-Enhancement-Proposals/issues/38, and an initial PR available at https://github.com/qgis/QGIS/pull/2857

 

Introduce everything necessary for QGIS3 to OSGeo4W (Jürgen Fischer)- €6,000

 

Details: For QGIS3 we need packages of Qt5, PyQt5 and Python 3 (including many extensions currently available for Python 2).   The goal of this proposal is to introduce all required dependencies to OSGeo4W (32&64bit) that are necessary to build and package QGIS3. The requested amount will cover 60h of work on this.

History: I also did the packaging of Qt4, PyQt4 and QGIS.  I’ve also already started to build and package Qt 5.7 using Visual C++ 2015.

Qualifications: See previous point (or well known history)

Implementation Plan: I plan on doing it this in Q4 this year to have it available for the release and I don’t expect significant extra effort to support Windows (ie. if the issues are solved on a platform that already has Qt5 and friends available it should also work on Windows).

Implement an inbuilt Task Manager in QGIS for background long running tasks (Nyall Dawson) – €4,500

Details: QGIS requires a centralised, in built task manager to handle background threading of long running analysis tasks. Currently these long running tasks are either conducted while blocking the UI (such as when a snapping index is built for a layer) leading users to conclude that QGIS has frozen, via blocking progress dialogs which prevent interaction with QGIS while the operation proceeds, or via custom threaded implementations. By building a standard framework for handling these long running tasks, we will benefit by:


1. Avoiding UI blocking tasks, allowing users to continue working while the task is completed.
2. Simplify background task threading for plugin, processing algorithm (and core) developers by exposing a simple API for creating and scheduling long running tasks.
3. Benefit from the stabler code which comes as a result of having a single, well tested implementation of background threading rather than multiple custom implementations of this code.
4. We “catch up” to our commercial competitors (ie ArcGIS and MapInfo Professional), who currently have inbuilt background threading of long running tasks already available in their software.

This work was begun in https://github.com/qgis/QGIS/pull/3004, however significant changes are still required before the task manager can be merged into QGIS. It is vital that the task manager implementation is rock solid and with a future proof API which addresses our needs for the 3.x release cycle.

Accordingly, this grant proposal covers:

1. Building off the work started in the pull request, first addressing the feedback received from GitHub and from direct conversations with interested stakeholders and stabilising the API.
2. Completion of the unit tests to cover all parts of the framework.
3. Polish the GUI for interacting with running and completed tasks.
4. Writing documentation for the Python cookbook demonstrating how the task manager should be used from Python code.

(Please note that this proposal does not cover porting any existing code (such as processing) across to the new framework.)

History: An initial prototype of the work was begun in https://github.com/qgis/QGIS/pull/3004  

Qualifications: I have an extensive history of complex changes to QGIS code, and am currently one of the most active QGIS core developers. I have a track record of implementing stable, heavily unit tested code and supporting code I write for extended periods. I am also a daily user of QGIS as a GIS software application, so am invested in making the software as powerful, stable and easy to use as possible!

Implementation Plan: This work would be completed ASAP to allow for lengthy testing prior to the QGIS 3.0 release, and to allow the maximum time possible for developers to adapt their code and plugins to the new task manager interface.

Proposal Link: An initial prototype of the work was begun in https://github.com/qgis/QGIS/pull/3004, and a video demonstration is available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7pXBZtWYFJc   

 


Update on the QGIS Grant Programme

At the beginning of August this year, we put out a call for applications in our newly launched grant programme. The intent of the programme is to leverage donor and sponsor funding in order to support community members with great ideas to improve the underlying infrastructure of the QGIS project and code base.

We have had a really great response to the call for applications (detailed list of applications is here for your reading pleasure – 233KB download). There has also been some good discussion on the QGIS Developer mailing list about the evaluation process.

Given that we have 18 proposals and only 20,000 Euros to disburse, the QGIS voting members will need to make some tough, pragmatic choices. Its also noteworthy that this is the first time since establishing our community of QGIS Voting Members that we have asked them to vote on an issue. Our intent with the voting member system is to have a streamlined process for deciding on important issues whilst ensuring good representation of all members of the community. In case you are wondering who the QGIS Voting members are, I have prepared this little infographic below which lists the members and shows how they are elected  etc.

qgisoperationalstructure-votingmembersonlyThe voting for the grant proposals ends at the end of the September 2016, and we plan to announce the successful candidates soon after that – probably on the 4th of October. The PSC will arbitrate in the case of a dead heat or the proposal amounts of the top voted proposals not adding up to our funding target.

This round of grant proposals is special not only because it is the first time we are doing this, but also because the grant programme precedes the upcoming release of QGIS 3.0. Providing grants to facilitate this work will help to assure that QGIS 3.0 gets all the love and attention it needs in order to make it a success. That said, there is a huge amount of work to do, and it is mostly being done by a handful of very dedicated and generous (with their time) individuals. If you have the wherewithal to further support some of the grant proposals that did not make the cut, or the QGIS 3.0 effort in general, please get into contact with our treasurer, Andreas Neumann (finance [at] qgis.org) or head over to our sponsorship or donations page to support their work!

Lastly, I appeal to those QGIS Voting Members who have not yet cast their votes to check your email and head over to the voting form to cast your vote!


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