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Thu Oct 8 11:15:11 2015

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QGIS Planet

Not always about new features

I love a good feature just as much as the next person but sometimes it’s great to fix a small workflow issue that has bugged you for the longest time.

If you have ever seen this kind of dialog you will know what I mean


The good old Python error dialog in QGIS.  The dialog is there to tell you that an exception was raised in Python somewhere and would dump out the error for you to debug it.   One big issue with this dialog though.  It’s blocking.  Blocking dialogs are really bad.   As a user, the blocking dialog means a broken workflow. Worst of all, there really is nothing you can do about it because the only thing you can do is close.

This dialog has now been replaced with a message bar if something goes wrong in Python code.  The message bar is non blocking and lets you continue working even if something didn’t work correctly.


The message bar has two buttons.  One will open the stack trace dialog to see the error in more detail. The other button opens the log window.


The message bar will only show a single error message for each type of error even if there are multiple exceptions in a row. A good example of this is an error in a mouse move event handler causing a error on each mouse move.

Filed under: qgis Tagged: qgis

Quick webmaps with qgis2web

In Publishing interactive web maps using QGIS, I presented two plugins for exporting web maps from QGIS. Today, I want to add an new member to this family: the qgis2web plugin is the successor of qgis-ol3 and combines exports to both OpenLayers3 as well as Leaflet.

The plugin is under active development and currently not all features are supported for both OpenLayers3 and Leaflet, but it’s a very convenient way to kick-off a quick webmapping project.

Here’s an example of an OpenLayers3 preview with enabled popups:

OpenLayers3 preview

OpenLayers3 preview

And here is the same map in Leaflet with the added bonus of a nice address search bar which can be added automatically as well:

Leaflet preview

Leaflet preview

The workflow is really straight forward: select the desired layers and popup settings, pick some appearance extras, and then don’t forget to hit the Update preview button otherwise you might be wondering why nothing happens ;)

I’ll continue testing these plugins and am looking forward to seeing what features the future will bring.

What went on at FOSS4G 2015?

Granted, I could only follow FOSS4G 2015 remotely on social media but what I saw was quite impressive and will keep me busy exploring for quite a while. Here’s my personal pick of this year’s highlights which I’d like to share with you:


Marco Hugentobler at FOSS4G 2015 (Photo by Jody Garnett)

Marco Hugentobler at FOSS4G 2015 (Photo by Jody Garnett)

The Sourcepole team has been particularly busy with four presentations which you can find on their blog.

Marco Hugentobler’s keynote is just great, summing up the history of the QGIS project and discussing success factor for open source projects.

Marco also gave a second presentation on new QGIS features for power users, including live layer effects, new geometry support (curves!), and geometry checker.

There has also been an update to QTiles plugin by NextGIS this week.

If you’re a bit more into webmapping, Victor Olaya presented the Web App Builder he’s been developing at Boundless. Web App Builder should appear in the official plugin repo soon.

Preview of Web App Builder from Victors presentation

Preview of Web App Builder from Victors presentation


If you work with messy, real-world data, you’ve most certainly been fighting with geocoding services, trying to make the best of a bunch of address lists. The Python Geocoder library promises to make dealing with geocoding services such as Google, Bing, OSM & many easier than ever before.

Let me know if you tried it.

Mobmap Visualizations

Mobmap – or more specifically Mobmap2 – is an extension for Chrome which offers visualization and analysis capabilities for trajectory data. I haven’t tried it yet but their presentation certainly looks very interesting:

UI theme support now core in QGIS

I enjoy using the dark UI theme for QGIS so much I figured why not make it a core feature. In the next version of QGIS if you head to the options screen you can now find a UI Theme option.

Options | General_037

The default dark theme is called Night Mapping for all those late night mapping jobs that you do, or if you just like dark UI themes.

QGIS b789fab_029



Something you will notice with this theme is the custom icons for the layer visibility. Pretty nifty! Here is how it is done

Creating new themes

To create a new theme simply make a new folder in .qgis2\themes\ with the name of the theme you want and create a style.qss file inside there. Check out the default themes for an example

Follow the Qt style sheet guides to see what can be styled.

Something I have added on top of the normal style sheets is variable support. Variables can be declared in a variables.qss file in the theme folder.

Here is an example of some variables:

@background: #323232
@text: #aaa
@selection: #507098
@menuback: #444
@highlight: #ffaa00

Now in style.qss we can do this:

color: @text;
background-color: @background;

Great for not having to repeat your self or quick updating in a single place. When the theme is applied via the Options dialog or via the API it will replace the variables in style.qss using variables.qss. The result file is called

Needs some tweaks

The default dark theme is a collection of stuff I have found around the net and stuff I have added myself. It’s far from prefect and I would love help to make it the best dark theme for QGIS. If you have another theme you think would make a good default one open a pull request on GitHub


Filed under: Open Source, qgis Tagged: qgis

QGIS Welcome Page

Whenever you start QGIS you basically do it because? Right, because you need to do GIS work. Ah, how I love rhetorical questions to start a post. And most of the time one continues to work on a QGIS project which

Syntactic sugar for PyQGIS

PyQGIS now supports a nice new addition for handling edit sessions in layers. This way, changes get committed automatically at the end of a successful (python) edit session.

with edit(layer):
    do your changes here()
See more ›

Using TimeManager for WMS-T layers

This is a guest post by Karolina Alexiou (aka carolinux), Anita’s collaborator on the Time Manager plugin.

As of version 2.1.5, TimeManager provides some support for stepping through WMS-T layers, a format about which Anita has written  in the past.  From the official definition, the OpenGIS® Web Map Service Interface Standard (WMS) provides a simple HTTP interface for requesting geo-registered map images from one or more distributed geospatial databases. A WMS request defines the geographic layer(s) and area of interest to be processed. The response to the request is one or more geo-registered map images (returned as JPEG, PNG, etc) that can be displayed in a browser application. QGIS can display those images as a raster layer. The WMS-T standard allows the user of the service to set a time boundary in addition to a geographical boundary with their HTTP request.

We are going to add the following url as the web map provider service:

From QGIS, go to Layer>Add Layer>Add WMS/WMST Layer and add a new server and connect to it. For the service we have chosen, we only need to specify a name and the url.

Select the top level layer, in our case named nexrad_base_reflect and click Add. Now you have added the layer to your QGIS project.

To add it to TimeManager as well, add it as a raster with the settings from the screenshot below. Start time and end time have the values 2005-08-29:03:10:00Z and 2005-08-30:03:10:00Z respectively, which is a period which overlaps with hurricane Katrina. Now, the WMS-T standard uses a handful of different time formats, and at this time, the plugin requires you to know this format and input the start and end values in this format. If there’s interest to sponsor this feature, in the future we may get the format directly from the web service description. The web service description is an XML document (see here for an example) which, among other information, contains a section that defines the format, default time and granularity of the time dimension.


If we set the time step to 2 hours and click play, we will see that TimeManager renders each interval by querying the web map service for it, as you can see in this short video.

Querying the web service and waiting for the response takes some time. So, the plugin requires some patience for looking at this particular layer format in interactive mode. If we export the frames, however, we can get a nice result. This is an animation showing hurricane Katrina progressing over a 30 minute interval.


If you want to sponsor further development of the Time Manager plugin, you can arrange a session with me – Karolina Alexiou – via Codementor.

Open source IDF router for QGIS

This is a follow-up on my previous post introducing an Open source IDF parser for QGIS. Today’s post takes the code further and adds routing functionality for foot, bike, and car routes including oneway streets and turn restrictions.

You can find the script in my QGIS-resources repository on Github. It creates an IDFRouter object based on an IDF file which you can use to compute routes.

The following screenshot shows an example car route in Vienna which gets quite complex due to driving restrictions. The dark blue line is computed by my script on GIP data while the light blue line is the route from (via the OSM route plugin) on OSM data. Minor route geometry differences are due to slight differences in the network link geometries.

Screenshot 2015-08-01 16.29.57

QGIS 2.10 RPMs for Fedora 21, Centos 7, Scientific Linux 7

qgis-icon_smallThanks to the work of Volker Fröhlich and other Fedora/EPEL packagers I was able to create RPM packages of QGIS 2.10 Pisa for Fedora 21, Centos 7, and Scientific Linux 7 using the great COPR platform.


The following packages can now be installed and tested on epel-7-x86_64 (Centos 7, Scientific Linux 7, etc.), and Fedora-21-x86_64:

  • qgis 2.10.1
  • qgis-debuginfo 2.10.1
  • qgis-devel 2.10.1
  • qgis-grass 2.10.1
  • qgis-python 2.10.1
  • qgis-server 2.10.1

Installation instructions (run as “root” user or use “sudo”):


# EPEL7:
yum install epel-release
yum update
wget -O /etc/yum.repos.d/qgis-2-10-epel-7.repo
yum update
yum install qgis qgis-grass qgis-python

# Fedora 21:
dnf copr enable neteler/QGIS-2.10-Pisa
dnf update
dnf install qgis qgis-grass qgis-python


The post QGIS 2.10 RPMs for Fedora 21, Centos 7, Scientific Linux 7 appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

Open source IDF parser for QGIS

IDF is the data format used by Austrian authorities to publish the official open government street graph. It’s basically a text file describing network nodes, links, and permissions for different modes of transport.

Since, to my knowledge, there hasn’t been any open source IDF parser available so far, I’ve started to write my own using PyQGIS. You can find the script which is meant to be run in the QGIS Python console in my Github QGIS-resources repo.

I haven’t implemented all details yet but it successfully parses nodes and links from the two example IDF files that have been published so far as can be seen in the following screenshot which shows the Klagenfurt example data:

Screenshot 2015-07-23 16.23.25

If you are interested in advancing this project, just get in touch here or on Github.

Recent labelling improvements in QGIS master

If you’re not like me and don’t keep a constant eye over at QGIS development change log (be careful – it’s addictive!), then you’re probably not aware of a bunch of labelling improvements which recently landed in QGIS master version. I’ve been working recently on a large project which involves a lot (>300) of atlas map outputs, and due to the size of this project it’s not feasible to manually tweak placements of labels. So, I’ve been totally at the mercy of QGIS’ labelling engine for automatic label placements. Generally it’s quite good but there were a few things missing which would help this project. Fortunately, due to the open-source nature of QGIS, I’ve been able to dig in and enhance the label engine to handle these requirements (insert rhetoric about beauty of open source here!). Let’s take a look at them one-by-one:

Data defined quadrant in “Around Point” placement mode

First up, it’s now possible to specify a data defined quadrant when a point label is set to the Around Point placement mode. In the past, you had a choice of either Around Point mode, in which QGIS automatically places labels around point features in order to maximise the number of labels shown, or the Offset from Point mode, in which all labels are placed at a specified position relative to the points (eg top-left). In Offset from Point mode you could use data defined properties to force labels for a feature to be placed at a specific relative position by binding the quadrant to a field in your data. This allowed you to manually tweak the placement for individual labels, but at the cost of every other label being forced to the same relative position. Now, you’ve also got the option to data define the relative position when in Around Point mode, so that the rest of the labels will fall back to being automatically placed. Here’s a quick example – I’ll start with a layer with labels in Around Point mode:

Around Point placement mode

Around Point placement mode

You can see that some labels are sitting to the top right of the points, others to the bottom right, and some in the top middle, in order to fit all the labels for these points. With this new option, I can setup a data defined quadrant for the labels, and then force the ‘Tottenham’ label (top left of the map) to display below and to the left of the point:

Setting a data-defined quadrant

Setting a data-defined quadrant

Here’s what the result looks like:

Manually setting the quadrant for the Tottenham label

Manually setting the quadrant for the Tottenham label

The majority of the labels are still auto-placed, but Tottenham is now force to the lower left corner.

Data defined label priority

Another often-requested feature which landed recently is the ability to set the priority for individual labels. QGIS has long had the ability to set the priority for an entire labelling layer, but you couldn’t control the priority of features within a layer. That would lead to situations like that shown below, where the most important central station (the green point) hasn’t been labelled:

What... no label for the largest station in Melbourne?

What… no label for the largest station in Melbourne?

By setting a data defined priority for labels, I can set the priority either via values manually entered in a field or by taking advantage of an existing “number of passengers” field present in my data. End result is that this central station is now prioritised over any others:

Much better! (in case you're wondering... I've manually forced some other non-optimal placement settings for illustrative purposes!)

Much better! (in case you’re wondering… I’ve manually forced some other non-optimal placement settings for illustrative purposes!)

Obstacle only layers

The third new labelling feature is the option for “Obstacle only” layers. What this option does is allow a non-labelled layer to act as an obstacle for the labels in other layers, so they will be discouraged from drawing labels over the features in the obstacle layer. Again, it’s best demonstrated with an example. Here’s my stations layer with labels placed automatically – you can see that some labels are placed right over the features in the rail lines layer:

Labels over rail lines...

Labels over rail lines…

Now, let’s set the rail lines layer to act as an obstacle for other labels:

... setting the layer as an obstacle...

… setting the layer as an obstacle…

The result is that labels will be placed so that they don’t cover the rail lines anymore! (Unless there’s no other choice). Much nicer.

No more clashing labels!

No more clashing labels!

Control over how polygons act as obstacles for labels

This change is something I’m really pleased about. It’s only applicable for certain situations, but when it works the improvements are dramatic.

Let’s start with my labelled stations map, this time with an administrative boundary layer in the background:

Stations with administrative boundaries

Stations with administrative boundaries

Notice anything wrong with this map? If you’re like me, you won’t be able to look past those labels which cross over the admin borders. Yuck. What’s happening here is that although my administrative regions layer is set to discourage labels being placed over features, there’s actually nowhere that labels can possibly be placed which will avoid this. The admin layer covers the entire map, so regardless of where the labels are placed they will always cover an administrative polygon feature. This is where the new option to control how polygon layers act as obstacles comes to the rescue:

...change a quick setting...

…change a quick setting…

Now, I can set the administrative layer to only avoid placing labels over feature’s boundaries! I don’t care that they’ll still be placed inside the features (since we have no choice!), but I don’t want them sitting on top of these boundaries. The result is a big improvement:

Much better!

Much better!

Now, QGIS has avoided placing labels over the boundaries between regions. Better auto-placement of labels like this means much less time required manually tweaking their positioning, and that’s always a good thing!

Draw only labels which fit inside a polygon

The last change is fairly self explanatory, so no nice screenshots here. QGIS now has the ability to prevent drawing labels which are too large to fit inside their corresponding polygon features. Again, in certain circumstances this can make a huge cartographic improvement to your map.

So there you go. Lots of new labelling goodies to look forward to when QGIS 2.12 rolls around.


A Processing model for Tanaka contours

If you follow my blog, you’ve most certainly seen the post How to create illuminated contours, Tanaka-style from earlier this year. As Victor Olaya noted correctly in the comments, the workflow to create this effect lends itself perfectly to being automated with a Processing model.

The model needs only two inputs: the digital elevation model raster and the interval at which we want the contours to be created:

Screenshot 2015-07-05 18.59.34

The model steps are straightforward: the contours are generated and split into short segments before the segment orientation is computed using the following code in the Advanced Python Field Calculator:

p1 = $geom.asPolyline()[0]
p2 = $geom.asPolyline()[-1]
a = p1.azimuth(p2)
if a < 0:
   a += 360
value = a

Screenshot 2015-07-05 18.53.26

You can find the finished model on Github. Happy QGISing!

AGIT & GI_Forum 2015 wrap-up

It’s my pleasure to report back from this year’s AGIT and GI_Forum conference (German and English speaking respectively). It was great to meet the gathered GIS crowd! If you missed it, don’t despair: I’ve compiled a personal summary on Storify, and papers (German, English) and posters are available online. Here’s a pick of my favorite posters:

I also had the pleasure to be involved in multiple presentations this year:

QGIS at the OSGeo Day

As part of the OSGeo Day, I had the chance to present the latest and greatest QGIS features for map design in front of a full house:

Routing with OSM

On a slightly different note, my colleague Markus Straub and I presented an introduction to routing with OpenStreetMap covering which kind of routing-related information is available in OSM as well as a selection of different tools to perform routing on OSM.

Solving the “unnamed link” problem

In this talk, I presented approaches to solving issues with route descriptions that contain unnamed pedestrian or cycle paths.

Here you can find the full open access paper: Graser, A., & Straub, M. (2015). Improving Navigation: Automated Name Extraction for Separately Mapped Pedestrian and Cycle Links. GI_Forum ‒ Journal for Geographic Information Science, 1-2015, 546-556, doi:10.1553/giscience2015s546.

Inferring road popularity from GPS trajectories

In this talk, my colleague Markus Straub presented our new approach to computing how popular a certain road is. The resulting popularity value can be used for planning as well as routing.

Here you can find the full open access paper: Straub, M., & Graser, A. (2015). Learning from Experts: Inferring Road Popularity from GPS Trajectories. GI_Forum ‒ Journal for Geographic Information Science, 1-2015, 41-50, doi:10.1553/giscience2015s41.

QGIS Server powers the new City of Asti WebGIS

A few days ago the new WebGIS of the City of Asti, a 76000 inhabitants city in Piedmont, was launched.  The new WebGIS uses QGIS Server and QGIS Web Client to serve maps and provide street and cadastrial search and location services.

The new WebGIS was developed by ItOpen and is online at:

Want to sponsor some QGIS features? Here’s some ideas…

I’ve been working on QGIS for a number of years now and, contrary to what I thought when I started, my wishlist seems to grow longer with every feature I add to QGIS! Unfortunately, almost all of my QGIS development work is done on a volunteer basis and it’s sometimes hard to justify the time required to tackle items on this list. So here’s your chance to help me fix this!

Here’s a quick list of things which I’d love to add to QGIS (or improve), but would need someone to step up and help sponsor their development:

  • Raster marker symbol type: Currently QGIS supports a number of marker symbol types (simple markers, font markers, SVG markers) but there’s no option to just use a raster image file for a symbol. A few versions back I added support for a raster image fill type, and now I’d love to do the same for markers. Options could include overriding the image size, rotation and opacity. And of course, all of these properties would be data-definable.
  • Paint effects for diagrams: The successful Kickstarter campaign meant that QGIS 2.10 includes a powerful framework for applying live effects to layers, including drop shadows, outer glows, blurs, and colour effects (plus lots of others!). I’d like to take this framework and allow effects to be applied to diagrams on a layer. Drop shadows and outer glows would really help aid the readability of diagrams by allowing them to sit on a different visual layer to the rest of the map. The effects framework was designed to allow reuse across all of QGIS, and diagrams would be the next logical step in this.

    Layer effects for diagrams! (Well... a mockup of them...)

    Layer effects for diagrams! (Well… a mockup of them…)

  • Additional diagram types/options: While we’re on the topic of diagrams, there’s lots more that we could do with QGIS’ diagram support. We’ve currently got support for pie charts, text diagrams and histograms, but there’s a lot of really nice diagram styles which we don’t yet support. Everybody loves infographics with nicely designed diagrams… so I’d love the chance to extend what’s possible using QGIS diagram engine. Some ideas include icon arrays, circle packing.
  • Adding a geometry widget in the attribute table: This feature has been on my mind a lot lately. What I’d like to add is a new “geometry widget” as the last column in a layer’s attribute table. This widget would allow you to do all sorts of modifications to the geometry attached to a feature. Possible options include clearing the geometry (resetting it to null), copying the geometry as WKT or GeoJSON, or pasting geometry into the feature from a WKT string (making it super easy to copy the geometry between features). This could also be extended in future to start incorporating the editing capabilities current possible through the Plain Geometry Editor plugin.

    Poor quality mockup of a geometry widget...

    Poor quality mockup of a geometry widget…

  • Options for non square/straight line legend patches: QGIS’ legend currently has no options for customising the shape of legend patches. Polygon layers in the legend are rectangles, line layers are straight lines — that’s it. There’s lots of room for improvement here. I’d like to add options for shapes such as circles, rounded rectangles, jagged lines, and possibly even custom shapes (via a WKT string or something similar).

    Custom legend shapes anyone?

    Custom legend shapes anyone?

  • Improving the heatmap plugin: The current heatmap plugin needs some love. The code and UI could do with a big refresh. I’d love a chance to totally revamp this plugin and move it into QGIS core code, and allow it to be used from within processing models. I’d also like to add additional hotspot techniques, such as Getis Ord Gi* hotspotting, to the plugin.
  • Extending the raster calculator: QGIS’ raster calculator was given a bunch of needed fixes and improvements in 2.10, but there’s more we could do. The major limitation with the calculator is that it currently only supports functions with at most two parameters. This needs to be fixed so that we can add a bunch of much desired functions to the calculator – eg min, max, avg, coalesce, if, etc… Lack of support for multi-parameter functions is really holding back what’s possible in the calculator.

Of course, this list is just a start. I’m always keen to chat about any other features you’d like to see added to QGIS (or even tackle specific pet-hate bugs or frustrations!). Just drop me an email at to discuss.

Oh, one last thing – I’m in the process of preparing for my next crowd funded feature for QGIS – and this one is big! More on that shortly.


QGIS on the rise with journalists

If you are following QGIS on Twitter you’ve probably noticed the increasing number of tweets by journalists using QGIS.

For example this map in the Financial Times by Hannah Dormido

or this one with overview maps and three different levels of details

or this map with semi-transparent label backgrounds and nice flag images

or even Time Manager animations by raoulranoa in the Los Angeles Times

I think this is a great development and a sign of how wide-spread QGIS usage is today.

If you know of any other examples or if you are a journalist using QGIS yourself, I’d love to see more!

Customising the TimeManager time stamp

TimeManager is a fantastic plugin for QGIS which allows you to create animated maps from your data. You can read all about it here and here, and there’s a really nice demonstration of it here.

I’ve been playing with TimeManager a fair bit over the last month, and thought I’d share a quick tip on improving the appearance of TimeManager’s time stamp. TimeManager includes some basic functionality for placing a time stamp in the corner of your outputs, but it’s fairly limited. There’s only some basic appearance options, and no way to control the date or time formats displayed.

Default TimeManager time stamp

Default TimeManager time stamp

But, there’s a trick we can use to get around this: use a temporary point layer for the time stamp label. Let me elaborate:

  1. Create a throwaway point layer. It doesn’t matter what fields or format this layer has.
  2. Add a single point feature to this layer at the place you’d like the improved time stamp to appear at.

    Add a single point feature

    …add a single point feature

  3. We don’t want to see the marker, so hide the symbol for this layer by setting it to use a transparent fill and outline.

    Transparent fill and outline

    Transparent fill and outline

  4. Then, enable labels for this layer. Here’s the trick – set the label expression for the label to use “animation_datetime()” (or for QGIS 2.8, “$animation_datetime”). This is a custom function provided by the TimeManager plugin which evaluates to the current frame’s date and time.

    Setting the layer's label expression

    Setting the layer’s label expression

  5. Now, you can use all the built-in options within QGIS for styling this label. Buffers, drop shadows, background shapes… anything!

    ...tweaking the label appearance

    …tweaking the label appearance

  6. Apply and check. Much nicer!

    Formatted timestamp

    A nicely formatted time stamp

  7. To tweak the formatting of the time stamp’s date and time, you can modify the label expression using the built-in ‘format_date’, ‘year’, ‘month’, etc functions. Let’s try “format_date(animation_datetime(),’ddd dd MMM yyyy’)”:

    Tweaked expression

    Tweaked expression

Now, our final formatted time stamp looks like this:

Final, formatted time stamp

Final, formatted time stamp

…and there we go. Using this simple trick allows you to take advantage of all the possibilities which the QGIS labelling and expression engines allow!

*Bonus points for the first person to use this technique along with data defined controls for animating the label colour/size!

Video tutorial: animated heatmaps with QGIS

Do you like the QGIS heatmap functionality? Did you know that QGIS can also create animated heatmaps?

The following video tutorial shows all necessary steps. To reproduce it, you can get the sample data from my Time Manager workshop at #QGIS2015.

QGIS 2.10 symbology feature preview

With the release of 2.10 right around the corner, it’s time to have a look at the new features this version of QGIS will bring. One area which has received a lot of development attention is layer styling. In particular, I want to point out the following new features:

1. Graduated symbol size

The graduated renderer has been expanded. Formerly, only color-graduated symbols could be created automatically. Now, it is possible to choose between color and size-graduated styles:

Screenshot 2015-06-21 18.39.25

2. Symbol size assistant

On a similar note, I’m sure you’ll enjoy the size assistant for data-defined size:

Screenshot 2015-06-21 23.16.10 Screenshot 2015-06-21 23.16.01

What’s particularly great about this feature is that it also creates a proper legend for the data-defined sizes:

Screenshot 2015-06-21 23.18.46

3. Interactive class exploration and definition

Another great addition to the graduated renderer dialog is the histogram tab which visualizes the distribution of values as well as the defined class borders. Additionally, the user can interactively change the classes by moving the class borders:

Screenshot 2015-06-21 18.43.09

4. Live layer effects

Since Nyall’s crowd funding initiative for live layer effects was a resounding success, it is now possible to create amazing effects for your vector styles such as shadows, glow, and blur effects:

Screenshot 2015-06-21 18.45.22

I’m very much looking forward to seeing all the new map designs this enables on the QGIS map Flickr group.

Thanks to everyone who was involved in developing and funding these new features!

QField in the wild

QField Experimental is out, after a couple of months of requirements gathering, private early alpha testing and foremost tons of emails requesting access to the testes group we decided today to put the current BETA version in the playstore. This means that from now on you can install QField just like any other android app by using the playstore.

QField app on Google Play
See more ›

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