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Sat Sep 21 08:35:30 2019

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QGIS Planet

QGIS 3.10 Loves GeoPDF!

Recently, we’ve been working on an exciting development which is coming soon in QGIS 3.10… support for Geospatial PDF exports! This has been a long-desired feature for many QGIS users, and it was only made possible thanks to a group of financial backers (listed below). In this post, we’re going to explore these new features and how they improve your QGIS PDF outputs.

Geospatial PDFs can now be created either by exporting the main QGIS map canvas, or by creating and exporting a custom print layout. For instance, when you select the “Save Map as PDF” option from the main QGIS window, you’ll see a new group of Geospatial PDF related options:

At its most basic, Geospatial PDF is a standard extension to the PDF format which allows for vector spatial datasets to be embedded in PDF files. If the “Include vector feature information” checkbox is ticked when creating a Geospatial PDF output, then QGIS will automatically include all the geometry and attribute information from features visible within the page. So if we export a simple map to PDF, we’ll get an output file which looks just like any old regular PDF map output…

…but, we can also pull this PDF back into QGIS and treat it just like any other vector data source! In the screenshot below we’re using the Identify tool to query on of the polygons and see all the attribute information from the original source layer.

This ability adds a lot of value to PDF exports. Anyone who has ever been supplied a non-spatial PDF as a “spatial dataset” will attest to the frustrations these cause… but if you create proper Geospatial PDFs instead, then there’s no loss of the valuable underlying spatial information or feature attributes! Furthermore, if these PDFs are opened within Acrobat Reader, tools are enabled which allow users to query features interactively.

Another nice benefit which comes with Geospatial PDF output is that layers can be interactively toggled on or off in the PDF viewer. The screenshot below shows a Geospatial PDF file created from a simple QGIS map. On the left we have a list of the layers in the PDF, each of which can be turned on or off inside the PDF viewer!

The really nice thing here is that, thanks to the underlying smarts in the GDAL library which is responsible for the actual Geospatial PDF creation, the PDF renders identically to our original QGIS map. While labels turn on and off alongside their corresponding map layer, they are still correctly stacked in the exact same way as you see in the QGIS window. Furthermore, the created PDFs keep labels and vector features as vector artwork… so there’s absolutely no loss in quality when zooming in to the map! These files look GREAT!

On that same note… the sponsorship allowed us to tackle another related issue, which is that in previous QGIS versions PDF (or SVG) exports would always export every single vertex from any visible feature! Ouch! This meant that if you had a complex polygon boundary layer, you would potentially be creating a PDF with millions of vertices per feature, even though most of these would be overlapping and completely redundant at the exported map’s scale. Now, QGIS automatically simplifies vector features while exporting them (using an appropriate, effectively invisible, level of simplification). The dramatically reduces the created file sizes and speeds up opening them and navigating them in other applications (especially Inkscape). (There’s an option at export time to disable this simplification, if you have a specific reason to!).

Creating Geospatial PDFs from print layouts gives even more options. For a start, whenever a print layout is exported to Geospatial PDFs, we ensure that the created PDF correctly handles stacking of layers alongside any other print layout items you have. In the image below we see a custom print layout which includes interactive layer visibility controls. If a layer is toggled, it’s hidden only from the map item — all the other surrounding elements like the title, north arrow and scalebar remain visible:

That’s not all though! When exporting a print layout to Geospatial PDF, QGIS also hooks into any map themes you’ve setup in your project. If you select to include these themes in your output, then the result is magical! The screenshot below shows the export options for a project with a number of themes, and we’ve chosen to export these themes in the PDF:

Opening the resultant PDF shows that our layer control on the left now lists the map themes instead of individual layers. Viewers can switch between these themes, changing the visibility of layers and their styling to match the QGIS map theme from the project! Additionally, you can even expand out a theme and expose layer-by-layer visibility control. Wow! This means you could create a single PDF output file which includes an environmental, social, cadastral, transport, …. view of your map, all in the one file.

Lastly, there’s even control for fine-tuning the combination of layers which are exposed in the output PDF file and which ones should be toggled on and off together. In the screenshot below we’ve opted to group the “Aircraft” and “Roads” map layers into a single logical PDF group called “Transport”. 

The resultant PDF respects this, showing an entry in the interactive layer tree for “Transport” which toggles both the aircraft and roads layers together:

So there you go — the power of Geospatial PDF, coming your way in QGIS 3.10!

One semi-related benefit of this work is that it gave us an opportunity to rework how “layered” exports from print layouts are created. This has had a significant flow-on impact on the existing ability to create layered SVG outputs from QGIS. Previously, this was a rather fragile feature, which created SVGs with lots of issues – overlapping labels, incorrectly stacked layers, and last-but-not-least, non-descriptive layer names! Now, just like Geospatial PDF exports, the layered SVG exports correctly respect the exact look of your map, and have much more friendly, descriptive layer names:

This should significantly reduce the amount of housekeeping required when working on these layered SVG exports. 

This work was funded by:

  • Land Vorarlberg
  • Municipality of Vienna
  • Municipality of Dornbirn
  • Biodiversity Information Service for Powys and BBNP Local
  • Kanton Zug
  • Canton de Neuchâtel
  • Canton de Thurgovia

North Road are leading experts in extending the QGIS application to meet your needs. If you’d like to discuss how you can sponsor development of features or fixes which you want in QGIS, just contact us for further details!

 

 

Select by location: what about those geometric predicates?

Currently, there’s around 20 persons in Bucharest working on QGIS development during the Contributors Meeting. And because the name of the hackfest is changed from developers meeting to contributors meeting, I now feel welcome too (as a non-coding contributor). So what can I do, as a non-coding QGIS fan? Write documentation! I just started with … Continue reading Select by location: what about those geometric predicates?

(Fr) Oslandia recrute : développeur(se) C++ et Python

Sorry, this entry is only available in French.

Five QGIS network analysis toolboxes for routing and isochrones

In the past, network analysis capabilities in QGIS were rather limited or not straight-forward to use. This has changed! In QGIS 3.x, we now have a wide range of network analysis tools, both for use case where you want to use your own network data, as well as use cases where you don’t have access to appropriate data or just prefer to use an existing service.

This blog post aims to provide an overview of the options:

  1. Based on local network data
    1. Default QGIS Processing network analysis tools
    2. QNEAT3 plugin
  2. Based on web services
    1. Hqgis plugin (HERE)
    2. ORS Tools plugin (openrouteservice.org)
    3. TravelTime platform plugin (TravelTime platform)

All five options provide Processing toolbox integration but not at the same level.

If you are a regular reader of this blog, you’re probably also aware of the pgRoutingLayer plugin. However, I’m not including it in this list due to its dependency on PostGIS and its pgRouting extension.

Processing network analysis tools

The default Processing network analysis tools are provided out of the box. They provide functionality to compute least cost paths and service areas (distance or time) based on your own network data. Inputs can be individual points or layers of points:

The service area tools return reachable edges and / or nodes rather than a service area polygon:

QNEAT3 plugin

The QNEAT3 (short for Qgis Network Analysis Toolbox 3) Plugin aims to provide sophisticated QGIS Processing-Toolbox algorithms in the field of network analysis. QNEAT3 is integrated in the QGIS3 Processing Framework. It offers algorithms that range from simple shortest path solving to more complex tasks like Iso-Area (aka service areas, accessibility polygons) and OD-Matrix (Origin-Destination-Matrix) computation.

QNEAT3 is an alternative for use case where you want to use your own network data.

For more details see the QNEAT3 documentation at: https://root676.github.io/index.html

Hqgis plugin

Access the HERE API from inside QGIS using your own HERE-API key. Currently supports Geocoding, Routing, POI-search and isochrone analysis.

Hqgis currently does not expose all its functionality to the Processing toolbox:

Instead, the full set of functionality is provided through the plugin GUI:

This plugin requires a HERE API key.

ORS Tools plugin

ORS Tools provides access to most of the functions of openrouteservice.org, based on OpenStreetMap. The tool set includes routing, isochrones and matrix calculations, either interactive in the map canvas or from point files within the processing framework. Extensive attributes are set for output files, incl. duration, length and start/end locations.

ORS Tools is based on OSM data. However, using this plugin still requires an openrouteservice.org API key.

TravelTime platform plugin

This plugin adds a toolbar and processing algorithms allowing to query the TravelTime platform API directly from QGIS. The TravelTime platform API allows to obtain polygons based on actual travel time using several transport modes rather, allowing for much more accurate results than simple distance calculations.

The TravelTime platform plugin requires a TravelTime platform API key.

For more details see: https://blog.traveltimeplatform.com/isochrone-qgis-plugin-traveltime

Proj: Select Datum Transformations for EPSG:28992

(FOR REFERENCE, TODO: TO BE UPDATED AND TRANSLATED) If you startup QGIS 3.8 / Zanzibar the first time to load a data in our national CRS (EPSG:28992) you are being presented with the following dialog: I thought it had something todo with the fact that this OSGeo4W install maybe used the newer PROJ (6.0.1), but … Continue reading Proj: Select Datum Transformations for EPSG:28992

QGISnetworklogger plugin or what are QGIS and my service talking about…

Just released a ‘new’ plugin: QGIS Network Logger, install via the plugin manager of QGIS version 3.6 or higher (https://plugins.qgis.org/plugins/qgisnetworklogger/). One of the things QGIS is pretty good in is talking to OGC services (WebMapService/WMS, WebFeatureService/WFS etc etc), QGIS even talks to Esri web services. Something what was hard in this, is that if you … Continue reading QGISnetworklogger plugin or what are QGIS and my service talking about…

QGIS 3 and performance analysis

Context

Since last year we (the QGIS communtity) have been using QGIS-Server-PerfSuite to run performance tests on a daily basis. This way, we’re able to monitor and avoid regressions according to some test scenarios for several QGIS Server releases (currently 2.18, 3.4, 3.6 and master branches). However, there are still many questions about performance from a general point of view:

  • What is the performance of QGIS Server compared to QGIS Desktop?
  • What are the implications of feature simplification for polygons and lines?
  • Does the symbology have a strong impact on performance and in which proportion?

Of course, it’s a broad and complex topic because of the numerous possibilities offered by the rendering engine of QGIS. In this article we’ll look at typical use cases with geometries coming from a PostgreSQL database.

Methodology

The first way to monitor performance is to measure the rendering time. To do so, the Map canvas refreshis activated in the Settings of QGIS Desktop. In this way we can get the rendering time from within the Rendering tab of log messages in QGIS Desktop, as well as from log messages written by QGIS Server.

The rendering time retrieved with this method allows to get the total amount of time spent in rendering for each layer (see the source code).

But in the case of QGIS Server another interesting measure is the total time spent for a specific request, which may be read from log messages too. There are indeed more operations achieved for a single WMS request than a simple rendering in QGIS Desktop:

The rendering time extracted from QGIS Desktop corresponds to the core rendering time displayed in the sequence diagram above. Moreover, to be perfectly comparable, the rendering engine must be configured in the same way in both cases. In this way, and thanks to PyQGIS API, we can retrieve the necessary information from the Python console in QGIS Desktop, like the extent or the canvas size, in order to configure the GetMap WMS request with the appropriate WIDTH,, HEIGHT , and BBOX parameters.

Another way to examine the performance is to use a profiler in order to inspect stack traces. These traces may be represented as a FlameGraph. In this case, debug symbols are necessary, meaning that the rendering time is not representative anymore. Indeed, QGIS has to be compiled in Debug mode.

Polygons

For these tests we use the same dataset as that for the daily performance tests, which is a layer of polygons with 282,776 features.

Feature simplification deactivated

Let’s first have a look at the rendering time and the FlameGraph when the simplification is deactivated. In QGIS Desktop, the mean rendering time is 2591 ms. Using to the PyQGIS API we are able to get the extent and the size of the map to render the map again but using a GetMap WMS request this time.

In this case, the rendering time is 2469 ms and the total request time is 2540 ms. For the record, the first GetMap request is ignored because in this case, the whole QGIS project is read and cached, meaning that the total request time is much higher. But according to those results, the rendering time for QGIS Desktop and QGIS Server are utterly similar, which makes sense considering that the same rendering engine is used, but it is still very reassuring :).

Now, let’s take a look to the FlameGraph to detect where most of the time is spent.

 

Undoubtedly the FlameGraph’s are similar in both cases, meaning that if we want to improve the performance of QGIS Server we need to improve the performance of the core rendering engine, also used in QGIS Desktop. In our case the main method is QgsMapRendererParallelJob::renderLayerStatic where most of the time is spent in:

Methods Desktop % Server %
QgsExpressionContext::setFeature 6.39 6.82
QgsFeatureIterator::nextFeature 28.77 28.41
QgsFeatureRenderer::renderFeature 29.01 27.05

Basically, it may be simplified like:

Clearly, the rendering takes about 30% of the total amount of time. In this case geometry simplification could potentially help.

Feature simplification activated

Geometry simplification, available for both polygons and lines layers, may be activated and configured through layer’s Properties in the Rendering tab. Several parameters may be set:

  • Simplification may be deactivated
  • Threshold for a more drastic simplification
  • Algorithm
  • Provider simplification
  • Scale

Once the simplification activated, we varied the threshold as well as the algorithm in order to detect performance jumps:

The following conclusions can be drawn:

  • The Visvalingam algorithm should be avoided because it begins to be efficient with a high threshold, meaning a significant lack of precision in geometries
  • The ideal threshold for Snap To Grid and Distance algorithms seems to be 1.05. Indeed, considering that it’s a very low threshold, the precision of geometries is still pretty good for a major improvement in rendering time though

For now, these tests have been run on the full extent of the layer. However, we still have a Maximum scale parameter to test, so we’ve decreased the scale of the layer:

And in this case, results are pretty interesting too:

Several conclusions can be drawn:

  • Visvalingam algorithm should be avoided at low scale too
  • Snap To Grid seems counter-productive at low scale
  • Distance algorithm seems to be a good option

Lines

For these tests we also use the same dataset as that for daily performance tests, which is a layer of lines with 125,782 features.

Feature simplification activated

In the same way as for polygons we have tested the effect of the geometric simplification on the rendering time, as well as algorithms and thresholds:

In this case we have exactly the same conclusion as for polygons: the Distance algorithm should be preferred with a threshold of 1.05.

For QGIS Server the mean rendering time is about 1180 ms with geometry simplification compared to 1108 ms for QGIS Desktop, which is totally consistent. And looking at the FlameGraph we note that once again most of the time is spent in accessing the PostgreSQL database (about 30%) and rendering features (about 40%).

 

 

 

 

 

Symbology

Another parameter which has an obvious impact on performance is the symbology used to draw the layers. Some features are known to be time consuming, but we’ve felt that a a thorough study was necessary to verify it.

 

Firstly, we’ve studied the influence of the width as well as the Single Symbol type on the rendering time.

Some points are noteworthy:

Simple Line is clearly the less time consuming

– Beyond the default 0.26 line width, rendering time begins to raise consequently with a clear jump in performance

 

Another interesting feature is the Draw effects option, allowing to add some fancy effects (shadow, glow, …).

However, this feature is known to be particularly CPU consuming. Actually, rendering all the 125,782 lines took so long that we had to to change to a lower scale, with just some a few dozen lines. Results are unequivocal:

 

The last thing we wanted to test for symbology is the effect of the Categorized classification. Here are the results for some classifications with geometry simplification activated:

  • No classification: 1108 ms
  • A simple classification using the column “classification” (8 symbols): 1148 ms
  • A classification based on a stupid expression “classification x 3″ (8 symbols): 1261 ms
  • A classification based on string comparison “toponyme like ‘Ruisseau*'” (2 symbols): 1380 ms
  • A classification with a specific width line for each category (8 symbols): 1850 ms

Considering that a simple classification does not add an excessive extra-cost, it seems that the classification process itself is not very time consuming. However, as soon as an expression is used, we can observe a slight jump in performance.

Labeling

Another important part to study regarding performance is labeling and the underlying positioning. For this test we decreased the scale and varied the Placement parameter without tuning anything.

Clearly, the parallel labeling is much more time consuming than the other placements. However, as previously stated, we used the default parameters for each positioning, meaning that the number of labels really drawn on the map differs from a placement to another.

Points

The last kind of geometries we have to study is points. Similarly to polygons and lines, we used the same dataset as that of performance tests, that is a layer with 435588 points.

In the case of points geometries geometry simplification is of course not available. So we are going to focus on symbology and the impact of marker size.

Obviously Font Marker must be used carefully because of the underlying jump in performance, as well as SVG Symbols. Moreover, contrary to Simple Marker, an increase of the size implies a drastic augmentation in time rendering.

General conclusion

Based on this factual study, several conclusions can be drawn.

Globally, FlameGraph for QGIS Desktop and QGIS Server are completely similar as well as rendering time.

It means that if we want to improve the performance of QGIS Server, we have to work on the desktop configuration and the rendering engine of the QGIS core library.

Extracting generic conclusions from our tests is very difficult, because it clearly depends on the underlying data. But let’s try to suggest some recommendations :).

Firstly, geometry simplification seems pretty efficient with lines and polygons as soon as the algorithm is chosen cautiously, and as long as your features include many vertices. It seems that the Distance algorithm with a 1.05 threshold is a good choice, with both high and low scale. However, it’s not a magic solution!

Secondly, a special care is needed with regards to symbology. Indeed, in some cases, a clear jump in performance is notable. For example, fancy effects and Font Marker SVG Symbol have to be used with caution if you’re picky on rendering time.

Thirdly, we have to be aware of the extra cost caused by labeling, especially the Parallel  placement for line geometries. On this subject, a not very well-known parameter allows to drastically reduce labeling time: the PAL candidates option. Actually, we may decrease the labeling time by reducing the number of candidates. For an explicit use case, you can take a look at the daily reports.

In any case, improving server performance in a substantial way means improving the QGIS core library directly.

Especially, we noticed thanks to FlameGraph that most of the time is spent in drawing features and managing the data from the PostgreSQL database. By the way, a legitimate question is: “How much time do we spend on waiting for the database?”. To be continued 😉

If you hit performance issues on your specific configuration or want to improve QGIS awesomeness, we provide a unique QGIS support offer at http://qgis.oslandia.com/ thanks to our team of specialists!

You gave us feedback – we give you QField 1.0 RC3

We are really happy to announce the release a new great milestone in QField’s history, QField 1.0 Release Candidate 3! (Yes, you might have got a glimpse of the broken RC2 if you where very attentive)

Thanks to the great feedback we received since releasing RC1 we were able to fix plenty of issues and add some more goodies.

We would like to invite everybody to install this Release Candidate and help us test it as much as possible so that we can iron out as many bugs as possible before the final release of QField 1.0.

List of fixes since RC1:
• fixed bad synchronization / geopackage files not written) (PR #455)
• fix glitches in portrait mode (PR #423 and #439)
• fix highlighting of points (search and feature selection) (PR #443)
• fix GPS info window overlapping search icon (PR #438)
• redesign of scale bar (PR #438)
• fix crash in feature form (with invalid relations) (PR #440)
• fix date/time field editing (PR #421 and #458)
• fix project not loading the correct map theme (fix #459)
• fix QGS or QGZ does not exist (PR #453)

Unfortunately, due to necessary updates in the SDK we target, we had to drop support for Android 4.4. The minimum Android requirement as of this RC is Android 5.0 (SDK version 21).

In case playstore does not suggest an update to QField Lucendro 0.11.90, the last working version for Android 4.4, we suggest all Android 4.4 users to uninstall QField 1.0 RC 1 (which was broken on android 4.4) and reinstall QField from the store. This way you should get If you don’t use play store, you can find all QField releases under https://qfield.org/releases

You can easily install QField using the playstore (https://qfield.org/get), find out more on the documentation site (https://qfield.org) and report problems to our issues tracking system (https://qfield.org/issues)

QField, like QGIS, is an open source project. Everyone is welcome to contribute to make the product even better – whether it is with financial support, enthusiastic programming, translation and documentation work or visionary ideas.

If you want to help us build a better QField or QGIS, or need any services related to the whole QGIS stack don’t hesitate to contact us.

Plugin for tracking QGIS project files in git

We often have QGIS project files that are part of a customer project. To be able to manage versions of these project files or have multiple people working on it, they are managed inside a git repository.

This is however not easy, because with every save of a project file, thousands of lines change, even if the real change is minimal. Like a change of a layer name.

Current situation

This blows up the git repository for no reason. And worse: it makes it impossible to review changes, because the signal to noise ratio is horrible.

OPENGIS.ch has just released a shiny jewel to make your life easier. The Trackable QGIS Projects plugin will automatically rewrite the saved project into a much more stable format.

Understandable changes thanks to the trackable QGIS plugin

Just download the plugin, install it and you are done. No user interface available, no configuration needed.

QGIS on the road

We are extremely pleased to announce the QGIS on the road tour with three free events this spring all over Switzerland. Limited places available so act fast reserve your place for the location you want.

Telling the story of Ms Maya Mielina, a retired GIS analyst and passionate beekeeper, our QGIS experts will show you features that you might not even have imagined existed in QGIS and that will allow you to dramatically increase your efficiency.

The format of the event is not that of a classic workshop but rather a prolonged presentation of extremely useful features. To keep the presentation interesting we will not focus on details or give a step by step tutorial, instead, will give you the gist of the idea thanks to our videos.

We advise you to take notes and to rewatch the published videos after the event.

QField 1.0 is here

Let’s get straight to the point

It’s official, QField for QGIS 1.0 is out!

Get it while it’s hot on the Playstore (qfield.org/get) or on GitHub

We are incredibly pleased and proud of just having released such a jewel and are convinced that, thanks to all its features and conscious design choices, QField will make your field digitizing work much more efficient and pleasant.

Packed with loads of useful features like online and offline features digitizing, geometry and attributes editing, attribute search, powerful forms, theme switching, GPS support, camera integration and much more, QField is the powerful tool for those who need to edit on the go and would like to avoid standing in the swamp with a laptop or paper charts.

Let’s see what makes QField probably* the best mobile GIS in the world.

Work efficiently

QField focuses on efficiently getting GIS field work done and combines a minimal design with sophisticated technology to get data from the field to the office in a comfortable and easy way.

Fast and reactive

Thanks to the underlying QGIS engine and a lot of optimizations, QField is powerful and snappy. Even with complex projects, QField is a joy to work with.

Easy handling

Conscious design choices and a continuous focus on a minimal user interface drive QField’s development. This allows us to deliver a product wich is uncluttered and extremly user-friendly

Quickly digitise

Allowing a seamless digitizing experience is a paramount goal of QField. Thanks to a cleverly designed adaptive user interface and specific features like real-time attribute checks and snapping support, QField allows its users to be extremely time efficient.

Unmatched feature set

To be the best, you need to be clever but also skillful.

QField’s efficiency is matched only by its featureset that allows its users to make the most out of their fieldwork time.

Powerful cartography combined with full text search

The beauty of GIS is that maps are dynamic. Layers can individually be shown and hidden and information can be presented more or less prominently based on the task at hand. QField supports the endless styling possibilities offered by QGIS and thanks to a well placed theme switcher you can change the looks of the entire project with a single click. For even more customizability, QField allows hiding and showing layers by simply long-pressing on the layer name.

Furthermore, QField boasts a fully configurable attribute text search that will allow you to geolocate and edit that exact object you were looking for.

Geometry editing

Editing Geometries on the field is probably the most complex task an operator has to deal with. QField simplifies this process through an adaptive toolbar that appears only when necessary, snapping support and a crosshair digitizer.

Thanks to these enhancements, QField allows reducing the error rate significantly.

Support for high precision GNSS

Simple internal GPS accuracy might be enough for basic projects but cadastral surveying and other high accuracy digitizations have much higher requirements. QFields natively listens to the Android location services so it can take advantage of the best location provided by external devices.

Generate PDF

Thanks to QField’s native support for generating PDFs based on QGIS’s print layouts, your on the fly daily report map is just one click away.

Intuitive project chooser

When dealing with multiple projects, quickly being able to switch between them is key. QField comes with a beautiful file selector with favorite directories (long press on a folder to add it to the favorites and long press on the favorites list to remove it) and an automatic list of the last three opened projects that will save you heaps of time while looking for your projects.

Your data – Your decisions

QField does not impose any constraint on the data model, it is your data and you decide what they should look like and what values are acceptable. QField can enforce constraints for you and you can choose among various type of widgets to represent your data. QGIS will preconfigure some field types automatically, all you’ll have then to do is tweak the settings if you want and your project is ready for mobile prime time. Our documentation has all the information you need.

Extends your Geo Data Infrastructure seamlessly

QField uses QGIS to set up maps and forms so it automatically supports a wide variety of data formats. Thanks to this, you can comfortably prepare your project once and then deploy it everywhere. And since QGIS also has a server component, your project can be served on a WebGIS with the very same beautiful looks.

In fact you can see this exact infrastructure up and running under demo.qfield.org and with the “online_survey.qgs” project included in the QField demo projects.

Synchronize with WiFi, Cable or Network

You can synchronize your project and data (in case you are not using a centralized online database) using various methods thanks to our QFieldSync plugin.

Future cloud integration

In the near future we will add a cloud synchronization functionality, so that you will be able to seamlessly manage your project online and have them automatically deployed to your devices.

Installing and contributing

You can easily install QField using the Playstore (qfield.org/get), find out more on the documentation site (qfield.org), watch some demo videos on our channel (qfield.org/demo) and report problems to our issues tracking system (qfield.org/issues). Please note that the Playstore update can take some hours to roll out and if you had installed a version directly from GitHub, you might have to uninstall it to get the latest Playstore update.

QField, like QGIS, is an open source project. Everyone is welcome to contribute to making the product even better – whether it is with financial support, translation, documentation work, enthusiastic programming or visionary ideas.

We would like to thank our fantastic community for all the great translations, documentations, bug reports and general feedback they gave us. Thanks to all this, we were able to fix plenty of bugs, address performance issues and even add some super cool new features.

Development and deployment services

As masterminds behind QField and core contributor to QGIS, we are the perfect partner for your project. If you want to help us build a better QField or QGIS, or if you need any services related to the whole QGIS stack, don’t hesitate to contact us.

OPENGIS.ch

OPENGIS.ch helps you setting up your spatial data infrastructure based on seamlessly integrated desktop, web, and mobile components.
We support your team in planning, developing, deploying and running your infrastructure. Thanks to several senior geodata infrastructure experts, QGIS core developers and the makers of the mobile data acquisition solution QField, OPENGIS.ch has all it takes to make your project a success. OPENGIS.ch is known for its commitment to high-quality products and its continuous efforts to improve the open source ecosystem.

* We might be biased, but we do believe it

Who is behind QGIS at Oslandia ?

You are using QGIS and look for support services to improve your experience and solve problems ? Oslandia is here to help you with our full QGIS editor service range ! Discover our team members below.

You will probably interact first with our pre-sales engineer Bertrand Parpoil. He leads Geographical Information System projects for 15 years for large corporations, public administrations or hi-tech SME. Bertrand will listen to your needs and explore your use cases, to offer you the best set of services.

Régis Haubourg also takes part in the first steps of projects to analyze your usages and improve them. GIS Expert, he knows QGIS by heart and will make the most of its capabilities. As QGIS Community Manager at Oslandia, he is very active in the QGIS community of developers and contributors. He is president of the Francophone OSGeo local chapter ( OSGeo-fr ), QGIS voting member, organizes the French QGIS day conference in Montpellier, and participates to QGIS community meetings. Before joining Oslandia, he led the migration to QGIS and PostGIS at the Adour-Garonne Water Agency, and now guides our clients with their GIS migrations to OpenSource solutions. Régis is also a great asset when working on water, hydrology and other specific thematic subjects.

Loïc Bartoletti develops QGIS, specializing in features corresponding to his fields of interests : network management, topography, urbanism, architecture… We find him contributing to advanced vector editing in QGIS, writing Python plugins, namely for DICT management. Pushing CAD and migrations from CAD tools to GIS and QGIS is one of his major goals. He will develop your custom applications, combining technical expertise and functional competences. When bored, Loïc packages software on FreeBSD.

Vincent Mora is senior developer in Python and C++, as well as PostGIS expert. He has a strong experience in numerical simulation. He likes coupling GIS (PostGIS, QGIS) with 3D numerical computing for risk management or production optimization. Vincent is an official QGIS committer and can directly integrate your needs into the core of the software. He is also GDAL committer and optimizes low-level layers of your applications. Among numerous activities, Vincent serves as lead developer of the development team for Hydra Software, a tool dedicated to unified hydraulics and hydrology modelling and simulation based on QGIS.

Hugo Mercier is an officiel QGIS committer too for several years. He regularly talks in international conferences on PostGIS, QGIS and other OpenSource GIS softwares. He will implement your needs with new QGIS features, develop innovative plugins ( like QGeoloGIS ) and design and build your new custom applications, solving all kind of technological challenges.

Paul Blottière completes our QGIS committers : very active on core development, Paul has refactored the QGIS server component to bring it to an industry-grade quality level. He also designed and implemented the infrastructure allowing to guarantee QGIS server performances. He dedicated himself to QGIS server OGC certification, especially for WMS (1.3). Thanks to this work QGIS is now a reference OGC implementation.

Julien Cabièces recently joined Oslandia, and quickly dived into QGIS : he contributes to the core of this Desktop GIS, on the server component, as well as applications linked to numerical simulation. Coming from a satellite imagery company with industrial applications, he uses his flexibility to answer all your needs. He brings quality and professionalism to your projects, minimizing risks for large production deployments.

You may also meet Vincent Picavet. Oslandia’s founder is a QGIS.org voting member, and is involved in the project’s evolution and the organization of the community.

Aside from these core contributors, all other Oslandia members also master QGIS integrate this tool into their day-to-day projects.

Bertrand, Régis, Loïc, Vincent (x2), Hugo, Paul et Julien are in tune with you and will be happy to work together for your migrations, application development, and all your desires to contribute to the QGIS ecosystem. Do not hesitate to contact us !

Funding for selective masking in QGIS is now complete!

Few months ago, Oslandia launched QGIS lab’s , a place to advertise our new ideas for QGIS, but also a place to help you find co funders to make dreams become reality.

The first initiative is about label selective masking, a feature that will allow us to achieve even more professional rendering for our maps.

Selective masking

 

Thanks to the commitment of the Swiss QGIS user group and local authorities, this work is now funded !

We now can start working hard to deliver you this great feature for QGIS 3.10

Thanks again to our funders

A last word, this is not a classical crowd funding initiative, but a classical contract for each funder.

No more reason not to contribute to free and open source software!

QGIS Print Layouts Graphs and Charts — target reached!

We’ve just passed the extended deadline for our recent QGIS Print Layouts Graphs and Charts campaign, and the great news is that thanks to a large number of generous backers we’ve successfully hit the target for this campaign! This has only been possible thanks to the tireless work of the QGIS community and user groups in promoting this campaign and spreading the word.

The Print Layouts Graphs and Charts campaign is a joint effort with our friends at Faunalia, so we’ll soon be starting work together on all the wonderful new functionality heading to the QGIS DataPlotly plugin as a result. The work will be commencing late June, just after the QGIS 3.8.0 final release. Keep an eye out for further updates on the development from this time! You can read more about what’s coming in detail at the campaign page.

We’d like to take this opportunity to extend our heartfelt thanks to all the backers who have pledged to support this project:

  • Federico Gianoli
  • Papercraft Mountains
  • Liam McCrae
  • Henry Walshaw
  • Raúl Sangonzalo
  • Ferdinando Urbano
  • pitsch-ing.ch
  • Carbon-X
  • Gabriel Diosan
  • Rene Giovanni Borella
  • Enrico Bertonati
  • Guido Ingwer
  • David Addy
  • Gerd Jünger
  • Andreas Neumann
  • Stefano Campus
  • Michael Jabot
  • Korto
  • Enrico Ferreguti
  • Carlo A. Nicolini
  • Salvatore Fiandaca
  • Alberto Grava
  • Hans van der Kwast
  • Ben Hur Pintor
  • Silvio Grosso
  • Nobusuke Iwasaki
  • Alasdair Rae
  • Manori Senanayake
  • Canton de Neuchâtel
  • Matthias Daues
  • Alteri Seculo
  • SunGIS Ltd.
  • Stu Smith
  • Keolis Rennes
  • Gabriel Diosan
  • Aiden Price
  • Giacomo Ponticelli
  • Diane Fritz
  • Gemio Bissolati
  • Claire Birnie
  • Nicolas Roelandt
  • Rocco Pispico
  • Gabriel Bengtsson
  • Birds Eye View
  • Barend Köbben
  • Roberto Marzocchi (GTER)
  • Yoichi Kayama
  • Alessandro Sarretta
  • Luca Angeli
  • Luca Bellani
  • giswelt
  • Stefan Giese
  • Ben Harding
  • Joao Gaspar
  • Romain Lacroix
  • Ryan Cooper
  • Daniele Bonaposta
  • QGIS Swedish User Group
  • Nino Formica
  • Michael Gieding
  • Amedeo Fadini
  • Andrew Hannell
  • Stefano
  • Phil Wyatt
  • Brett Edmond Carlock
  • Transitec

 

Using QGIS from Conda

QGIS recipes have been available on Conda for a while, but now, that they work for the three main operating systems, getting QGIS from Conda is s starting to become a reliable alternative to other QGIS distributions. Anyway, let’s rewind a bit…

What is Conda?

Conda is an open source package management system and environment management system that runs on Windows, macOS and Linux. Conda quickly installs, runs and updates packages and their dependencies. Conda easily creates, saves, loads and switches between environments on your local computer. It was created for Python programs, but it can package and distribute software for any language.

Why is that of any relevance?

Conda provides a similar way to build, package and install QGIS (or any other software) in Linux, Windows, and Mac.

As a user, it’s the installation part that I enjoy the most. I am a Linux user, and one of the significant limitations is not having an easy way to install more than one version of QGIS on my machine (for example the latest stable version and the Long Term Release). I was able to work around that limitation by compiling QGIS myself, but with Conda, I can install as many versions as I want in a very convenient way.

The following paragraphs explain how to install QGIS using Conda. The instructions and Conda commands should be quite similar for all the operating systems.

Anaconda or miniconda?

First thing you need to do is to install the Conda packaging system. Two distributions install Conda: Anaconda and Miniconda.

TL;DR Anaconda is big (3Gb?) and installs the packaging system and a lot of useful tools, python packages, libraries, etc… . Miniconda is much smaller and installs just the packaging system, which is the bare minimum that you need to work with Conda and will allow you to selectively install the tools and packages you need. I prefer the later.

For more information, check this stack exchange answer on anaconda vs miniconda.

Download anaconda or miniconda installers for your system and follow the instructions to install it.

Windows installer is an executable, you should run it as administrator. The OSX and Linux installers are bash scripts, which means that, once downloaded, you need to run something like this to install:

bash Miniconda3-latest-Linux-x86_64.sh

Installing QGIS

Notice that the Conda tools are used in a command line terminal. Besides, on Windows, you need to use the command prompt that is installed with miniconda.

Using environments

Conda works with environments, which are similar to Python virtual environments but not limited only to python. Basically, it allows isolating different installations or setups without interfering with the rest of the system. I recommend that you always use environments. If, like me, you want to have more that one version of QGIS installed, then the use of environments is mandatory.

Creating an environment is as easy as entering the following command on the terminal:

conda create --name <name_of_the_environment>

For example,

conda create --name qgis_stable

To use an environment, you need to activate it.

conda activate qgis_stable

Your terminal prompt will show you the active environment.

(qgis_stable) [email protected]:~/miniconda3$

To deactivate the current environment, you run

conda deactivate

Installing packages

Installing packages using Conda is as simples as:

conda install <package_name>

Because conda packages can be stored in different channels, and because the default channels (from the anaconda service) do not contain QGIS, we need to specify the channel we want to get the package from. conda-forge is a community-driven repository of conda recipes and includes updated QGIS packages.

conda install qgis --channel conda-forge

Conda will download the latest available version of QGIS and all its dependencies installing it on the active environment.

Note: Because conda always try to install the latest version, if you want to use the QGIS LTR version, you must specify the QGIS version.

conda install qgis=3.4.8 --channel conda-forge

Uninstalling packages

Uninstalling QGIS is also easy. The quickest option is to delete the entire environment where QGIS was installed. Make sure you deactivate it first.

conda deactivate
conda env remove --name qgis_stable

Another option is to remove QGIS package manually. This is useful if you have other packages installed that you want to keep.

conda activate qgis_stable
conda remove qgis -c conda-forge

This only removes the QGIS package and will leave all other packages that were installed with it. Note that you need to specify the conda-forge channel. Otherwise, Conda will try to update some packages from the default channels during the removal process, and things may get messy.

Running QGIS

To run QGIS, in the terminal, activate the environment (if not activated already) and run the qgis command

conda activate qgis_stable
qgis

Some notes and caveats

Please be aware that QGIS packages on Conda do not provide the same level of user experience as the official Linux, Windows, and Mac packages from the QGIS.org distribution. For example, there are no desktop icons, and file association. It does not include GRASS and SAGA, etc …

On the other hand, QGIS installations on Conda it will share user configurations, installed plugins, with any other QGIs installations on your system.

(Nederlands) QGIS op de FOSS4GNL 2019 (20 juni in Delft)

Sorry, this entry is only available in the Dutch language

QGIS Print Layouts Graphs and Charts – campaign deadline extended!

If you’re a regular reader of this blog, it won’t surprise you to hear that we’re very excited about adding rich charting and graph functionality to QGIS’ Print Layout designer! Alongside our friends at Faunalia, we’re currently running a crowd funding campaign to make this a reality.

So, while the required funds weren’t raised within our original April 30 deadline, we’ve decided to extend this campaign by an additional 30 days in the hopes that the users and organisations from the wider QGIS community will jump onboard and pledge the remaining required funds.

This missing feature is a large gap in QGIS printing capabilities, so we’re counting on you to show your support and spread the word to your local user groups, QGIS users, and any organisations you know of who rely on QGIS and would love to see its inbuilt reporting capabilities levelled up!

QGIS on the road

We are extremely pleased to announce the QGIS on the road tour with three free events this spring all over Switzerland. Limited places available so act fast reserve your place for the location you want.

Telling the story of Ms Maya Mielina, a retired GIS analyst and passionate beekeeper, our QGIS experts will show you features that you might not even have imagined existed in QGIS and that will allow you to dramatically increase your efficiency.

The format of the event is not that of a classic workshop but rather a prolonged presentation of extremely useful features. To keep the presentation interesting we will not focus on details or give a step by step tutorial, instead, will give you the gist of the idea thanks to our videos.

We advise you to take notes and to rewatch the published videos after the event.

Plugin for tracking QGIS project files in git

We often have QGIS project files that are part of a customer project. To be able to manage versions of these project files or have multiple people working on it, they are managed inside a git repository.

This is however not easy, because with every save of a project file, thousands of lines change, even if the real change is minimal. Like a change of a layer name.

Current situation

This blows up the git repository for no reason. And worse: it makes it impossible to review changes, because the signal to noise ratio is horrible.

OPENGIS.ch has just released a shiny jewel to make your life easier. The Trackable QGIS Projects plugin will automatically rewrite the saved project into a much more stable format.

Understandable changes thanks to the trackable QGIS plugin

Just download the plugin, install it and you are done. No user interface available, no configuration needed.

QGIS (and SLYR!), now with Hash Lines support

Thanks to an anonymous corporate sponsor, we’ve recently had the opportunity to add a new Hashed Line symbol type for QGIS 3.8. This allows for a repeating line segment to be drawn over the length of a feature, with a line-sub symbol used to render each individual segment.

There’s tons of options available for customising the appearance and placement of line hashes. We based the feature heavily off QGIS’ existing “Marker Line” support, so you can create hashed lines placed at set intervals, on line vertices, or at the start/end/middle of lines. There’s options to offset the lines, and tweak the rotation angle of individual hashes too. Added to QGIS’ rich support for “data defined” symbol properties, this allows for a huge range of new symbol effects.

E.g. using a data defined hash length which increases over the length of a feature gives us this effect:

Or, when using a complex line sub-symbol for rendering each hash, we can get something like this:

Or even go completely “meta” and use a hashed line sub symbol for the hash line itself!

With the right combination of symbol settings and QGIS draw effects you can even emulate a calligraphic pen effect:

Or a chunky green highlighter!

This same corporate sponsor also funded a change which results in a huge improvement to the appearance of both rotated hashed lines and marker lines. Previously, when marker or hash lines were rendered, the symbol angles were determined by taking the exact line orientation at the position of the symbol. This often leads to undesirable rendering effects, where little “bumps” or corners in lines which occur at the position of the symbol cause the marker or hash line to be oriented at a very different angle to what the eye expects to see.

With this improvement, the angle is instead calculated by averaging the line over a specified distance either side of the symbol. E.g. averaging the line angle over 4mm means we take the points along the line 2mm from either side of the symbol placement, and use these instead to calculate the line angle for that symbol. This has the effect of smoothing (or removing) any tiny local deviations from the overall line direction, resulting in much nicer visual orientation of marker or hash lines.

It’s easiest to show the difference visually. Here’s a before image, showing arrow markers following a line feature. Pay specific attention to the 3rd and last arrow, which seem completely random oriented due to the little shifts in line direction:

With new smoothing logic this is much improved:

The difference is even more noticeable for hashed lines. Here’s the before:

…and the after:

Suffice to say, cartographers will definitely appreciate the result!

Lastly, we’ve taken this new hash line feature as an opportunity to implement automatic conversion of ESRI hash line symbols within our SLYR ESRI to QGIS conversion tool. Read more about SLYR here, and how you can purchase this tool for .style, .lyr and .mxd document conversion.

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