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Sat Dec 20 22:40:07 2014

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QGIS Planet

2nd edition of Learning QGIS

It’s my pleasure to announce that the updated and extended 2nd edition of Learning QGIS is available now.

I also want to take this opportunity to thank everyone who made the 1st edition such a great success!

This second edition has been updated to QGIS 2.6 and it features a completely new 6th chapter on Expanding QGIS with Python. It introduces the QGIS Python Console, shows how to create custom Processing tools, and provides a starting point for developing plugins.

Overall, the book has grown by 40 pages and the price of the print version has dropped by 3€ :-)

Happy QGISing!

2031OSos_mockupcover_normal_0


Mozilla Stumbler layer: loading TMS and XYZ tilelayers in QGIS

Mozilla Location Service (MLS) layer Personally I’m very interested in the Mozilla Location Service (MLS), I wrote an earlier article about it on my work (Zuidt.nl) blog. Key in this project is that both locations of wifi points and cell towers are crowdsourced and put in a open database, so everybody can use that data […]

QGIS 2.6 user guide released

The QGIS documentations team has released an updated version of the user guide:

qgisdocs26

I’d like to encourage everyone to have a look and explore the content, for example the great tips in the Actions menu section:

action_dialog


QGIS 2.6.1 and QGIS 2.6 Documentation Released

QGIS 2.6.1 Just a short notice that the QGIS project (silently) released QGIS 2.6.1, a bug fix release for the latest stable version of QGIS 2.6 Brighton. Some notable fixes include: - composer stuff which was not working ok - not all attribute columns showing in attribute table - metasearch (CSW plugin) was not working […]

Analyzing regional income differences

On my quest to create test data for spatial statistics, I’ve discovered income data for Austria per municipality on a news paper website:

Screenshot 2014-11-29 23.06.46

For further analysis, I decided to limit the area to Vienna and Lower Austria. Since the income data included GKZ “Gemeindekennzahl” IDs, it was possible to join them to municipalities extracted from OpenStreetMap using QuickOSM for QGIS. GRASS v.clean was used to clean the vector topology to the point where PySAL was able to compute spatial weights.

Using PySAL, I then computed income clusters: blue regions represent low clusters while red regions represent high clusters …

Municipality border data (c) OpenStreetMap and contributors Income data source: Statistik Austria via derStandard

Municipality border data (c) OpenStreetMap and contributors
Income data source: Statistik Austria via derStandard

The results show a statistically significant cluster of low income in the north west, in the area called Waldviertel, as well as a cluster of high income containing many of the municipalities surrounding Vienna, an area often referred to as the “Speckgürtel” (“bacon belt”).


Releasing TimeManager 1.2

Today, I’ve released TimeManager 1.2 which adds support for additional time formats: DD.MM.YYYY, DD/MM/YYYY, and DD-MM-YYYY (thanks to a pull request by vmora) as well as French translation (thanks to bbouteilles).

TimeManager now automatically detects formats such as DD.MM.YYYY

TimeManager now automatically detects formats such as DD.MM.YYYY

But there is more: the QGIS team has released a bugfix version 2.6.1 which you can already find in Ubuntu repos and the OSGeo4W installer. Go get it! And please support the bugfix release effort whenever you can.


How to build and debug QGIS with QtCreator

Here is how I build QGIS with QtCreator under ubuntu 14.04

A new QGIS tool (based on ogr2ogr) to import vectors in PostGIS, the fast way

In QGIS there are many tools that can be used to import vectors inside a PostGIS database, each one has pros and cons: SPIT core plugin: available since long ago but now seems to be a unmaintained tool and therefore will be probably removed in a future QGIS release. It  has the advantage to allow […]

Exploring QGIS 2.6 – Item panel for map composer

In recent releases QGIS’ map composer has undergone some large usability improvements, such as the ability to select and interact with multiple items, and much improved navigation of compositions. Another massive usability improvement which is included in QGIS 2.6 is the new “Items” panel in the map composer. The panel shows a list of all items currently in the composition, and allows you to individually select, show or hide items, toggle their lock status, and rearrange them via drag and drop. You can also double click the item’s description to modify its ID, which makes managing items in the composition much easier.

QGIS composer’s new items panel

This change has been on my wish list for a long time. The best bit is that implementing the panel has allowed me to fix some of the composer’s other biggest usability issues. For instance, now locked items are no longer selectable in the main composer view. If you’ve ever tried to create fancy compositions with items which are stacked on top of other items, you’ll know that trying to interact with the lower items has been almost impossible in previous QGIS versions. Now, if you lock the higher stacked items you’ll be able to fully interact with all underlying items without the higher items getting in the way. Alternatively you could just temporarily hide them while you work with the lower items.

This feature brings us one more step closer to making QGIS’ map composer a powerful DTP tool in itself. If you’d like to help support further improvements like this in QGIS, please consider sponsoring my development work, or you can contact me directly for a quote on specific development.

More experiments with Game of Life

As promised in my recent post “Experiments with Conway’s Game of Life”, I have been been looking into how to improve my first implementation. The new version which you can now find on Github is fully contained in one Python script which runs in the QGIS console. Additionally, the repository contains a CSV with the grid definition for a Gosper glider gun and the layer style QML.

Rather than creating a new Shapefile for each iteration like in the first implementation, this script uses memory layers to save the game status.

You can see it all in action in the following video:

(video available in HD)

Thanks a lot to Nathan Woodrow for the support in getting the animation running!

Sometimes there are still hick-ups causing steps to be skipped but overall it is running nicely now. Another approach would be to change the layer attributes rather than creating more and more layers but I like to be able to go through all the resulting layers after they have been computed.


QGIS 2.6 ‘Brighton’ released

In the new release of QGIS 2.6.0 a series of new features have been added concerning

  • General: new features and bugfixes,
  • DXF export (improvements),
  • Map Composer (enhancements),
  • Processing (including a new modeler implementation),
  • QGIS Server (improvements),
  • Symbology (including user interface improvements),
  • User Interface with improvements.

A visual changelog is available for more details with lots of screenshots.

Congratulations to all QGIS developers! Looking forward to see the Fedora RPM available…

You can download QGIS 2.6 at http://qgis.org/en/site/forusers/download.html

The post QGIS 2.6 ‘Brighton’ released appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

Experiments with Conway’s Game of Life

This experiment is motivated by a discussion I had with Dr. Claus Rinner about introducing students to GIS concepts using Conway’s Game of Life. Conway’s Game of Life is a popular example to demonstrate cellular automata. Based on an input grid of “alive” and “dead” cells, new cell values are computed on each iteration based on four simple rules for the cell and its 8 neighbors:

  1. Any live cell with fewer than two live neighbours dies, as if caused by under-population.
  2. Any live cell with two or three live neighbours lives on to the next generation.
  3. Any live cell with more than three live neighbours dies, as if by overcrowding.
  4. Any dead cell with exactly three live neighbours becomes a live cell, as if by reproduction.

(Source: Wikipedia – Conway’s Game of Life)

Based on these simple rules, effects like the following “glider gun” can be achieved:

Gospers glider gun.gif
Gospers glider gun” by KieffOwn work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

There are some Game of Life implementations for GIS out there, e.g. scripts for ArcGIS or a module for SAGA. Both of these examples are raster-based. Since I couldn’t find any examples of raster manipulation like this in pyQGIS, I decided to instead implement a vector version: a Processing script which receives an input grid of cells and outputs the next iteration based on the rules of Game of Life. In the following screencast, you can see the Processing script being called repeatedly by a script from the Python console:

So far, it’s a quick and dirty first implementation. To make it more smooth, I’m considering adding spatial indexing and using memory layers instead of having Processing create a bunch of Shapefiles.

It would also be interesting to see a raster version done in PyQGIS. Please leave a comment if you have any ideas how this could be achieved.


Visualize flows with FlowMapper

This article explains the presentation of flows on a map, using the FlowMapper plugin. For this demonstration, data on commuting patterns between 40 regions are used (from Statistics Netherlands). Preparing the data After the plugin is installed in the usual way, the manual can be found in the folder C:\Users\{username}\.qgis2\python\plugins\FlowMapper2_documentation.Three text files are required, with node […]

Creating custom colour schemes in PyQGIS

In my last post I explored some of the new colour related features available in QGIS 2.6. At the end of that post I hinted at the possibility of creating QGIS colour schemes using python. Let’s take a look…

We’ll start with something nice and easy – a colour scheme which contains a predefined set of colours (e.g., standard company colours). This is done by subclassing QgsColorScheme and implementing the required methods ‘schemeName‘, ‘fetchColors‘ and ‘clone‘. It’s all fairly self explanatory – most of the important stuff happens in fetchColors, which returns a list of QColor/string pairs. Here’s a sample:

from PyQt4.QtCore import *
from PyQt4.QtGui import *

class QgsCgaLightColorScheme(QgsColorScheme):
    def __init__(self, parent=None): 
        QgsColorScheme.__init__(self)
 
    def schemeName(self):
        return "CGA Colors!"
 
    def fetchColors(self,context='', basecolor=QColor()):
        return [[QColor('#555555'),'Gray'],
                    [QColor('#5555FF'),'Light Blue'],
                    [QColor('#55FF55'),'Light Green'],
                    [QColor('#55FFFF'),'Light Cyan'],
                    [QColor('#FF5555'),'Light Red'],
                    [QColor('#FF55FF'),'Light Magenta'],
                    [QColor('#FFFF55'),'Yellow'],
                    [QColor('#FFFFFF'),'White']]
    def flags(self):
        return QgsColorScheme.ShowInAllContexts
 
    def clone(self):
        return QgsCgaLightColorScheme()

cgaScheme = QgsCgaLightColorScheme()
QgsColorSchemeRegistry.instance().addColorScheme(cgaScheme)

This scheme will now appear in all colour buttons and colour picker dialogs:

CGA colours… what your map was missing!

If you only wanted the scheme to appear in the colour picker dialog, you’d modify the flags method to return QgsColorScheme.ShowInColorDialog instead.

QgsColorSchemes can also utilise a “base colour” when generating their colour list. Here’s a sample colour scheme which generates slightly randomised variations on the base colour. The magic again happens in the fetchColors method, which copies the hue of the base colour and generates random saturation and value components for the returned colours.

from PyQt4.QtCore import *
from PyQt4.QtGui import *
import random

class QgsRandomColorScheme(QgsColorScheme):
    def __init__(self, parent=None): 
        QgsColorScheme.__init__(self)

    def schemeName(self):
        return "Random colors!"

    def fetchColors(self, context='', basecolor=QColor() ):
        noColors = random.randrange(30)
        minVal = 130;
        maxVal = 255;
        colorList = []
        for i in range(noColors):
            if basecolor.isValid():
                h = basecolor.hue()
            else:
                #generate random hue
                h = random.randrange(360);

            s = random.randrange(100,255)
            v = random.randrange(100,255)

            colorList.append( [ QColor.fromHsv( h, s, v), "random color! " + str(i) ] )

        return colorList

    def flags(self):
        return QgsColorScheme.ShowInAllContexts

    def clone(self):
        return QgsRandomColorScheme()

randomScheme = QgsRandomColorScheme()
QgsColorSchemeRegistry.instance().addColorScheme(randomScheme)

Here’s the random colour scheme in action… note how the colours are all based loosely around the current red base colour.

Randomised colours

You may also have noticed the context argument for fetchColors. This can be used to tweak the returned colour list depending on the context of the colour picker. Possible values include ‘composer‘, ‘symbology‘, ‘gui‘ or ‘labelling‘.

One final fun example… here’s a colour scheme which grabs its colours using the Colour Lovers API to fetch a random popular palette from the site:

from PyQt4.QtCore import *
from PyQt4.QtGui import *
from xml.etree import ElementTree
import urllib2
import random

class colorLoversScheme(QgsColorScheme):

    def __init__(self, parent=None): 
        QgsColorScheme.__init__(self)
        xmlurl = 'http://www.colourlovers.com/api/palettes/top'

        headers = { 'User-Agent' : 'Mozilla/5.0' }
        req = urllib2.Request(xmlurl, None, headers)
        doc = ElementTree.parse(urllib2.urlopen(req)).getroot()

        palettes = doc.findall('palette')
        palette = random.choice(palettes)

        title = palette.find('title').text
        username = palette.find('userName').text
        attrString = title + ' by ' + username
        colors = ['#'+c.text for c in palette.find('colors').findall('hex')]

        self.color_list = [[QColor(c), attrString] for c in colors]

    def schemeName(self):
        return "Color lovers popular palette"

    def fetchColors(self, context='', basecolor=QColor()):
        return self.color_list

    def flags(self):
        return QgsColorScheme.ShowInAllContexts

    def clone(self):
        return colorLoversScheme()

loversScheme = colorLoversScheme()      
QgsColorSchemeRegistry.instance().addColorScheme( loversScheme )

Clicking a colour button will now give us some daily colour scheme inspiration…

Grabbing a palette from the Colours Lovers site

Grabbing a palette from the Colours Lovers site

Ok, now it’s over to all you PyQGIS plugin developers – time to go wild!

What’s new in QGIS 2.6 – Tons of colour improvements!

With one month left before the release of QGIS 2.6, it’s time to dive into some of the new features it will bring… starting with colours.

Working with colours is a huge part of cartography. In QGIS 2.4 I made a few changes to improve interaction with colours. These included the ability to copy and paste colours by right clicking on a colour button, and dragging-and-dropping colours between buttons. However, this was just the beginning of the awesomeness awaiting colours in QGIS 2.6… so let’s dive in!

Part 1 – New colour picker dialog

While sometimes it’s best to stick with an operating system’s native dialog boxes, colour pickers are one exception to this. That’s because most native colours pickers are woefully inadequate, and are missing a bunch of features which make working with colours much easier. So, in QGIS 2.6, we’ve taken the step of rolling out our very own colour picker:

New QGIS colour picker

Before starting work on this, I conducted a review of a number of existing colour picker implementations to find out what works and what doesn’t. Then, I shamelessly modelled this new dialog off the best bits of all of these! (GIMP users will find the new dialog especially familiar – that’s no coincidence, it’s a testament to how well crafted GIMP’s colour picker is.)

The new QGIS colour picker features:

  • Colour sliders and spin boxes for Hue, Saturation, Value, Red, Green and Blue colour components
  • An opacity slider (no more guessing what level of transparency “189” corresponds to!)
  • A text entry box which accepts hex colours, colour names and CSS rgb(#,#,#) type colours. (The drop down arrow you can see on this box in the screenshot above allows you to specify the display format for colours, with options like #RRGGBB and #RRGGBBAA)
  • A grid of colour swatches for storing custom colours
  • A visual preview of the new colour compared to the previous colour
  • Support for dragging and dropping colours into and out of the dialog
  • A colour wheel and triangle method for tweaking colours (by the way, all these colour widgets are reusable, so you can easily dump them into your PyQGIS plugins)
    Colour wheel widget
  • A colour palettes tab. This tab supports adding and removing colours from a palette, creating new palettes and importing and exporting colours from a GPL palette file. (We’ll explore colour palettes in more detail later in this post.)
    Colour palettes
  • A colour sampler! This tab allows you to sample a colour from under the mouse pointer. Just click the “Sample color” button, and then click anywhere on the screen (or press the space bar if you’re sampling outside of the QGIS window). You even get the choice of averaging the colour sample over a range of pixels. (Note that support for sampling is operating system dependant, and currently it is not available under OSX.)
    Built in colour sampler! Woohoo!

Part 2 – New colour button menus

Just like the new colour dialog is heavily based off other colour dialog implementations, this new feature is inspired by Microsoft’s excellent colour buttons in their recent Office versions (I make no claim to originality here!). Now, all QGIS colour buttons come with a handy drop down menu which allows you to quickly choose from some frequently used colour shortcuts. You’ve got the previously available options of copying and pasting colours from 2.4, plus handy swatches for recently used colours and for other standard colours.

colour_menu

Handy colour menu for buttons

Part 3 – Colour palettes

You may have noticed in the above screenshot the “Standard colors” swatches, and wondered what these were all about.  Well, QGIS 2.6 has extensive support for color palettes. There’s a few different “built-in” color palettes:

  • The “Standard colors” palette. This palette can be modified through the Options → Colors tab. You can add, remove, edit, and rename colours, as well as import color schemes from a GPL palette file. These standard colours apply to your QGIS installation, so they’ll be available regardless of what project you’re currently working on.

    Customising the standard colours

    Customising the standard QGIS colours

  • The “Project colors” palette. This can be accessed via the Project Properties → Default styles tab. This palette is saved inside the .qgs project file, so it’s handy for setting up a project-specific colour scheme.
  • The “Recent colors” palette. This simply shows colours you’ve recently used within QGIS.

You can easily create new colour palettes directly from the colour picker dialog. Behind the scenes, these palettes are saved into your .qgis/palettes folder as standard GPL palette files, which makes it nice and easy to modify them in other apps or transfer them between installations. It’s also possible to just dump a stack of quality palettes directly into this folder and they’ll be available from within QGIS.

Perhaps the best bit about colour schemes in QGIS is that they can be created using PyQGIS plugins, which opens up tons of creative possibilities… More on this in a future blog post!

So there we go. Tons of improvements for working with colours are heading your way in QGIS 2.6, which is due out on the 24th October.

(Before we end, let’s take a quick look at what the competition offers over in MapInfo land. Yeah… no thanks. You might want to invest some development time there Pitney Bowes!)

QGIS training (3 days) and Birdwatching/Field data collection (2 days) in South Portugal, January 2015

Faunalia and Imagine-Science are pleased to announce a QGIS training (3 days) course during a week that will include 2 days of field activities related to birdwatching and field data collection. Where: Portugal/Algarve, specifically “Ria de Alvor -Mexilhoeira Grande” near Portimão. When: 26 to 30 January 2015.   For more informations about QGIS training program, […]

Labels as text in SVG exports

Today’s post is inspired by a recent thread on the QGIS user mailing list titled “exporting text to Illustrator?”. The issue was that with the introduction of the new labeling system, all labels were exported as paths when creating an SVG. Unnoticed by almost everyone (and huge thanks to Alex Mandel for pointing out!) an option has been added to 2.4 by Larry Shaffer which allows exporting labels as texts again.

To export labels as text, open the Automatic Placement Settings (button in the upper right corner of the label dialog) and uncheck the Draw text as outlines option.

Screenshot 2014-09-20 21.03.26

Note that we are also cautioned that

For now the developers recommend you only toggle this option right
before exporting
and that you recheck it after.

Alex even recorded a video showcasing the functionality:


Gary Sherman wins the Sol Katz award

This year Gary Sherman won the annual Sol Katz award. To quote the OSGEO page about the award:

The Sol Katz Award for Geospatial Free and Open Source Software (GFOSS) is awarded annually by OSGeo to individuals who have demonstrated leadership in the GFOSS community. Recipients of the award will have contributed significantly through their activities to advance open source ideals in the geospatial realm. The hope is that the award will both acknowledge the work of community members, and pay tribute to one of its founders, for years to come.

A couple of years ago I did an interview with Gary about the beginning of QGIS:

and part2:

I am so pleased that the Sol Katz award committee has seen fit to present this award to Gary. The fact that Gary created QGIS and open sourced its code has had a profound effect on many people’s lives – especially my own. Participating in QGIS for the last decade+ has immeasurably improved my own life and enabled me to eke out a comfortable living doing something I love. Hardly a day goes without me receiving an email in my inbox from someone in a far flung place telling me how they are using QGIS and how it is making their world a better place.

Presenting this award to Gary is a long overdue recognition and ‘thank you’ to the person who started a project that has become the rally point for an incredible, diverse and  friendly bunch of people, and a daily use tool for hundreds of thousands of users how there who may not even know who Gary is. QGIS rocks Gary, and so do you!

Here is Gary’s acceptance speech:

 

 

Slides FOSS4G 2014

Slides from our presentations at FOSS4G 2014 in Portland/Oregon:

@PirminKalberer

Share and manage your Data with QGIS Cloud and WFS-T

A lot of people are using QGIS Cloud as a service with ready to use QGIS webclient. It’s very easy to publish data and share maps in this way. But QGIS Cloud has more power under the hood. A not so obvious feature of QGIS Cloud is the option to share your data via Web Feature Service (WFS) and manage them via Web Feature Service Transactional (WFS-T). “The basic Web Feature Service allows querying and retrieval of features. A transactional Web Feature Service (WFS-T) allows creation, deletion, and updating of features” (Wikipedia). With WFS-T you have full access to your vector data for editing over the web. Since QGIS Server includes WFS-T functionality, you can manage and edit your data served by QGIS Cloud from every client supporting WFS-T. In addition, with QGIS Cloud Pro you have the option to control access to your published WFS.

How to setup a QGIS Cloud WFS-T in few steps:

  1. Setup a QGIS Project containing the data you like to pubish as WFS-T

  2. Load local vector data of your choice to your project.

  3. Define vector layers you wish to publish and set the appropriate settings for them in the following way:
    • open the Project Properties -> OWS Server tab.
    • scroll to the WFS-Capabilities section and setup the appropriate settings. Tick Published, Update, Insert and Delete for every layer you want to publish.

  • additionally you can set the published fields of every layer in the Layer Properties -> Fields tab.

  • Publish the project on QGIS Cloud.
    • save the project. (If you don’t have installed the QGIS Cloud plugin, than install it from the official QGIS Plugin Repository)
    • open the QGIS Cloud plugin and log in your QGIS Cloud account. (If you don’t have a QGIS Cloud account, sign up a new account).
    • upload the local data to your QGIS Cloud database (if you don’t have a QGIS Cloud database, create one from the QGIS Cloud plugin).
    • publish the project via QGIS Cloud plugin.
    • that’s it!

Have a look at the Services tab of the QGIS Cloud Plugin. There you will find the URL for Public WMS. Your just created WFS has the same URL. Now you can start working with WFS and WFS-T.

Working with WFS-T in QGIS Desktop

You can access your WFS-T with QGIS or any other client which supports WFS and WFS-T. As an example here we show how to access WFS with QGIS Desktop:

  1. Open the QGIS WFS Server connections dialog (Layer -> Add WFS Layer … ).
  2. Add a new connection
  3. Give the connection a name of your choice and add the above created URL
  4. Click connect and you will see the just published WFS layers
  5. Add one or more of them to your project

Thus you have set the Update, Insert and Delete options for the WFS, these layers can be edited in QGIS like any other editable layer.

All the services published under QGIS Cloud Free are public and accessible by everyone. If you need resctricted access , you can order the QGIS Cloud Pro plan.

Follow @QGISCloud on Twitter for QGISCloud related news and infos.

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