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Tue Mar 31 13:00:08 2015

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QGIS Planet

Time Manager 1.6 – now with feature interpolation

Over the last couple of weeks, Karolina has been very busy improving and expanding Time Manager. This post is to announce the 1.6 release of Time Manager which brings you many fixes and exciting new features.

Screenshot 2015-03-25 17.58.38

What’s this feature interpolation you’re talking about?

Interpolation is really helpful if you have multiple observations of the same (moving) real-world object at different points in time and you want to visualize the movement between the observations. This can be used to visualize animal paths, vehicle tracks, or any other movement in space.

The following example shows a simple layer which contains 12 point features (3 for each id value).

Screenshot 2015-03-25 17.50.55

Using Time Manager interpolation, it is easy to create animations with interpolated positions between observations:

animation

How is it done?

When you open the Time Manager 1.6 Settings | Add layer dialog, you will find a new option for interpolation settings. This first version supports linear interpolation of point features but more options might be added in the future. Note how the id attribute is specified to let Time Manager know which features belong to the same real-world object.

Screenshot 2015-03-25 17.43.08

For the interpolation, Time Manager creates a new layer which contains the interpolated features. You can see this layer in the layer list.

Screenshot 2015-03-25 17.46.13

I’m really looking forward to seeing all the great animations this feature will enable. Thanks Karolina for making this possible!


Inofficial QGIS 2.8 RPMs for EPEL 7: Fedora 20, Fedora 21, Centos 7, Scientific Linux 7

qgis-icon_smallThanks to the work of Devrim Gündüz, Volker Fröhlich, Dave Johansen, Rex Dieter and other Fedora/EPEL packagers I had an easy going to prepare RPM packages of QGIS 2.8 Wien for Fedora 20 and 21, Centos 7, and Scientific Linux 7.

The base SRPM package I copied from Fedora’s koji server, modified the SPEC file in order to remove the now outdated PyQwt bindings (see bugzilla) and compiled QGIS 2.8 via the great COPR platform.

Repo: https://copr.fedoraproject.org/coprs/neteler/QGIS-2.8-Wien/

The following packages can now be installed and tested on epel-7-x86_64 (Centos 7, Scientific Linux 7, etc.), Fedora-20-x86_64, and Fedora-21-x86_64:

  • qgis 2.8.1
  • qgis-debuginfo 2.8.1
  • qgis-devel 2.8.1
  • qgis-grass 2.8.1
  • qgis-python 2.8.1
  • qgis-server 2.8.1

Installation instructions (run as “root” user or use “sudo”):

# EPEL7:
wget -O /etc/yum.repos.d/qgis-epel-7.repo https://copr.fedoraproject.org/coprs/neteler/QGIS-2.8-Wien/repo/epel-7/neteler-QGIS-2.8-Wien-epel-7.repo
yum update
yum install qgis qgis-grass qgis-python qgis-server

# Fedora 20:
wget -O /etc/yum.repos.d/qgis-epel-7.repo https://copr.fedoraproject.org/coprs/neteler/QGIS-2.8-Wien/repo/fedora-20/neteler-QGIS-2.8-Wien-fedora-20.repo
yum update
yum install qgis qgis-grass qgis-python qgis-server

# Fedora 21:
wget -O /etc/yum.repos.d/qgis-epel-7.repo https://copr.fedoraproject.org/coprs/neteler/QGIS-2.8-Wien/repo/fedora-21/neteler-QGIS-2.8-Wien-fedora-21.repo
yum update
yum install qgis qgis-grass qgis-python qgis-server

The other packages are optional (well, also qgis-grass, qgis-python, and qgis-server…).

Enjoy!

PS: Of course I hope that QGIS 2.8 officially hits EPEL7 anytime soon! My COPR repo is just a temporary bridge towards that goal.

The post Inofficial QGIS 2.8 RPMs for EPEL 7: Fedora 20, Fedora 21, Centos 7, Scientific Linux 7 appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

Oceancolor Data Downloader v1.0 for QGIS

Aqua Modis SST 2015-01-13

Sea Surface Temperature data downloaded by Oceancolor Data Downloader.

The Oceancolor Data Downloader is a new plugin for QGIS from the Mapping and Geographic Information Centre of the British Antarctic Survey that downloads Oceancolor and Sea Surface Temperature data from NASA’s Oceancolor website. The plugin currently downloads three datasets:

  • MODIS AQUA chlorophyll concentration
  • SeaWiFS chlorophyll concentration
  • MODIS AQUA night time Sea Surface Temperatures

The data accessed includes daily, 8 day, monthly and yearly composites, all of which can be saved to disk while downloading. Future plans for the plugin include additional access to other datasets such as ocean Net Primary Production, selection by bounding box, the ability to save in other formats, a progress bar etc.

I used the plugin to download global Sea Surface Temperatures for the 13th Jan 2015. I then used shapefiles from Natural Earth to create a simple basemap. I finally chose the IBCAO Polar Stereographic projection (EPSG: 3996) to create a map centred on the North Pole.

If you use the plugin to produce published research, please cite:

10.5281/zenodo.15018


Google Map Style with “Shape Burst” effect in QGIS 2.3

Here’s a nice looking map I created using QGIS 2.3, the testing version of QGIS. I downloaded free OpenStreetMap data and I styled it to look just like Google Maps, as per instructions published by Anita Graser. I also outlined county boundaries using the new “Shape Burst” effect, which creates a pleasing graduated colour pattern that faithfully follows polygon outlines (it’s also applied to the Sea, though it’s quite subtle). I used Data Defined Properties to restrict the effect to all counties except Dublin City, this also created a Mask.

Lastly, there’s also a subtle “Coastal Vignette” effect, these are fine lines that trace the coastline and were typical of old style hand drawn maps. Must have taken a tremendous amount of patience. I developed a simple method of reproducing the effect and I’ll let you know how I did it in my next blog post. Oh and by the way, the scale relates to a map printed at A3 size.

 


Adding ESRI’s Online World Imagery Dataset to QGIS

ESRI’s ArcGIS Online World Imagery is a high resolution satellite and aerial imagery base map for use in Google Earth, ArcMap and ArcGIS Explorer. The same excellent imagery is used by the Bing Maps Aerial layer. Somewhat surprisingly, World Imagery can also be accessed by QGIS, as it supports ESRI’s map servers that use Representational State Transfer (REST) and Simple Object Assess Protocol (SOAP) standards.

Simply copy and past the following code into the Python Console in QGIS and press return (Plugins – Console):

qgis.utils.iface.addRasterLayer("http://server.arcgisonline.com/ArcGIS/rest/services/World_Imagery/MapServer?f=json&pretty=true","raster")

The code adds an ESRI Online World Imagery base map to QGIS. It has a number of advantages over the popular OpenLayers Plugin that adds various Google, Bing and OpenStreetMap image layers to QGIS. Unlike images downloaded by the OpenLayers plugin the ESRI World Imagery base map is a true Raster who’s attributes are fully editable e.g. brightness, blending mode and transparency can be adjusted. World Imagery can also be printed at a very high resolution with other QGIS layers on a map and without it shifting relative to other layers; a conspicuous problem with OpenLayers that does not use “On the Fly” re-projection and only prints Google, Bing layers at a low resolution. It is an ideal aerial base map.

References:

QGIS: Adding An ArcServer Rest Service

Connecting to ArcGIS “mapserver” layers


Nautical Charts in QGIS – The Compass Rose

Before the advent of shipborne satellite navigation systems, navigation at sea required three precise measurements – Solar or Stellar Declination for Latitude, Time at Greenwich for Longitude and True North that determined the ship’s heading. True North was obtained from the ship’s Magnetic Compass, an instrument who’s name indicates at an additional complication.

A magnetic compass does not point towards True North. Magnetic North is 100s km from the Geographic North Pole and the Earth’s magnetic field is uneven, it is distorted by magnetic irregularities within the Outer Core and intrinsically magnetic Mantle and Crustal rock. Additionally, the position of Magnetic North is not fixed, it is presently drifting from Arctic Canada towards Russia at 15 km per year. Therefore True North has to be derived from Magnetic North using a correction called Magnetic Declination (or Magnetic Variation), the angular difference between Magnetic North and True North. Magnetic Declination varies from location to location and over time.

Nautical navigation charts typically contain one or more Compass Roses, also called a Windrose, these consist of two circles – an outer circle that displays the cardinal directions of North, East, South and West and a inner circle that displays the direction of Magnetic North. The Magnetic Declination and its annual rate of change is typically printed within the Compass Rose, it is therefore possible to calculate the Magnetic Declination several years after a map is printed.

In this tutorial I will show you a process that to create a Compass Rose with the correct Magnetic Declination and Annual Rate of Change for any terrestrial location for use in QGIS. First we need to obtain a suitable Compass Rose graphic. Conveniently the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) published a Compass Rose in the Public Domain i.e. it is free to use without limitation. I downloaded a version of the NOAA Compass Rose from Wikimedia (or you can right click and save the Compass Rose below). Additionally, the background of this Compass Rose is transparent, this allows a map (or indeed a web page) to show though (note the Magnetic Declination in 1985 was 4 degrees 15 minutes west of True North and it had an annual decrease of 8 minutes of a degree per year).

800px-Modern_nautical_compass_rose.svg

There are several handy on-line utilities that can calculate Magnetic Declination and the Annual Rate of Change but we shall use Charles F. F. Karney’s excellent cross-platform GeographicLib in this case. GeographicLib is a suite of command line utilities for solving solving various geodesic problems such as conversions between geographic, UTM, UPS, MGRS, geocentric and local cartesian coordinates, gravity calculations, determining geoid height, and magnetic field calculations. The latest version can be obtained as a pre-compiled binary from Sourceforge or as source code.

The other essential step is to measure the precise map location in WGS84 coordinates. This can be done using the Coordinated Capture plug-in provided as standard with QGIS. To select the WGS84 coordinate reference system (CRS) click the sphere symbol in Coordinated Capture panel to open the Coordinate Reference System Selector. After setting the CRS to WGS84 (EPSG: 4326), click the icon left of the “Copy to Clipboard” button (this toggles real time display of captured coordinates) and then click “Start Capture”. The position in Decimal Degrees will be updated in the upper window as you move the cursor across the map, the lower window will display projected coordinates (in my case Pseudo Mercator EPSG: 3857). Clicking the map will select a coordinate point and the real time display will cease updating.

Wordpress

The MagneticField utility of GeographicLib is then used to calculate the Magnetic Declination and Annual Rate of Change for the captured coordinate, in this case a location east of Howth, Ireland.

$ MagneticField -r -t 2014-08-04 --input-string "53.37772 6.00935"

-3.57 67.81 18572.9 18536.9 -1152.2 45528.7 49171.3
0.17 -0.01 17.9 21.2 52.4 19.6 24.9

The results are: Magnetic Declination in degrees (-3.57); the inclination of the Magnetic Field in degrees (67.81); the horizontal strength of the magnetic field in nanotesla (18572.9 nT); the north component of the field (18536.9 nT); the east component of the field in (-1152.2 nT); the vertical component of the field in nT (45528.7 nT) and the total field (49171.3 nT). The numbers on the second line are the annual rate of change of these values, the first number is. We only need the first numbers on each line; the Magnetic Declination (-3.57) and Annual Rate of Change of Magnetic Declination (0.17). We can convert these to Degrees Minutes Seconds if required.

After calculating the Magnetic Declination and Annual Rate of Change, edit the NOAA Compass Rose in a graphics program such as  GIMP or Photoshop. In my case I copied the inner circle to a separate layer and I rotated it 3.57 degrees anticlockwise. I then added text to the Compass Rose stating the Magnetic Declination (Var.) and the Annual Rate of Change (Annual Decrease). After editing the Compass Rose graphic I finally added it to my Nautical Chart as a Image in Map Composer of QGIS.

Further Reading:

Bowditch, N. & ‎National Imagery and Mapping Agency, 2002. CHAPTER 3. NAUTICAL CHARTS. In: The American Practical Navigator: An Epitome of Navigation. Bethesda, MD : Washington, DC, Paradise Cay Publications, 9, 23–50. ISBN: 978-0939837540 http://msi.nga.mil/MSISiteContent/StaticFiles/NAV_PUBS/APN/Chapt-03.pdf


Creating a Nautical Chart in QGIS 2.4

Continuing with a nautical theme, here is a nautical chart I creating using QGIS 2.4. It includes a Graticule in decimal degrees, a Compass Rose and a scale bar in Nautical Miles. A magnetic declination of 3º 35′ was determined using the MagneticField utility of GeographicLib, an advanced software library for solving geodesic problems. I will post a full tutorial shortly.

Nautical Chart for North Dublin Bay


The Coastal Vignette

Vignette2

Coastal Vignette seen on an old Irish ‘6-Inch map’

Occasionally on old maps you may see a pleasing decorative effect on bodies of water called a “Coastal Vignette”, these are fine lines that highlight coastlines and lake shores. The example seen above is from a ca. 100 year old “6-inch map” of Lough Nafooey in County Galway, Ireland. I presume the Coastal Vignette effect in this example was hand drawn, it required considerable skill and patience.

These is no plugin for creating Coastal Vignettes in QGIS just yet, so I developed a simple technique to recreate the effect using the raster Proximity (Raster Distance)’ algorithm accessible in the Processing Toolbox.

In order to use the Proximity Analysis tool I first converted a Shapefile polygon depicting the sea off Dublin into a 10 by 10 metre resolution Raster using the menu command ‘Raster – Conversion – Rasterize (Vector to raster)’.

Box

This generated a Raster that coded the Sea as ‘1’ (white) and ‘0’ (black) for Land.

Next, I selected ‘Proximity (raster distance)’  from the Processing Toolbox – (GDAL/OGR) – [GDAL] Analysis – Proximity (raster distance). You can quickly find the command by typing the algorithm’s name in the box above the Processing Toolbox.

Screenshot5

I entered 0 in the ‘Values’ box, this tells the Proximity algorithm to measure the distance away from land (a value of 0). The resulting Raster contains cell values that correspond to the distance away from the coast in metres, which I styled below.

The final step is to create Contours Lines from the Proximity analysis result using the menu item Raster – Contour. In my case I used an “interval between the contour lines” of 200 metres and I added an Attribute name called “DIST”.

Screenshot7

The resulting contour lines have distance attributes attached to them can be used to create a Graduated colour style if needed, though in my cause I manually edited the attributes of 10 contour lines nearest the coast and I gradually increased the transparency of the mid-grey contour lines from opaque at the coast to fully transparent out at sea. I made the remaining contour lines transparent.

And here is the finished result, with the Sea and an OpenStreetMap base map styled to look just like Google Maps.

Finished Vignette 2


Go2streetview plugin for QGIS

A very handy plugin for QGIS I use day to day is go2streetview by Enrico Ferreguti. The plugin adds an icon to the tool bar in QGIS and when selected I can click a road or street on a base map and a window will open that displays the Google Street or a Bing Maps Bird’s Eye view of the location. The camera’s direction and location is highlighted by a blue marker. I use the plugin when tracing boundaries of parks, open spaces and foot paths from aerial imagery. If the imagery is blurred or the view is obscured by trees, I click a point on a nearby street to see the location up close. The plugin works wherever Google Street view and Bing Birds Eye has coverage.

For example, in the screen-shot below notice there is a footpath leading to a bus shelter that’s not mapped by OpenStreetMap. I know where it is now, I will add it to my map.

Street View

Plugin: go2streetview


Game of Life – Raster edition

You probably remember my Game of Life posts from last year: Experiments with Conway’s Game of Life & More experiments with Game of Life where I developed a vector-based version of GoL.

Richard Wen and Claus Rinner at Ryerson University now published a raster-based version.

Here’s a screenshot of the script in action:

Screenshot 2015-03-08 20.04.07

The code is hosted on Github and I’m sure there will be many other ideas which can build on code snippets to read and write raster cell values.

For more info, please visit the GIS at Ryerson blog.


Generating an XYZ ASCII file from a QGIS raster

Someone wrote to me asking if it would be possible to generate an XYZ ASCII file from a single band raster layer in QGIS. No doubt there are more efficient ways (this approach is pretty slow but it works), but I thought it would be fun to show how you can iterate over a raster, writing out the value of each cell into a text file (along with the centroid coordinates for that cell).

 

 

 

 

To use the script, you should save it to your local machine, then open the python console and load the script in the python editor. Next select a single band raster and then run the script in the editor. If your raster is quite large, it will take some time to run. I have spent zero time trying to optimise the script – if someone has an idea for doing it faster, send me a patch and I will update the example above.

The generated output dataset will look something like this:

 

Longitude,Latitude,VI
8.31259406548,7.86128343221,10
8.31264849753,7.86128343221,16
8.31270292958,7.86128343221,18
8.31248520138,7.8613378416,15
8.31253963343,7.8613378416,17
8.31259406548,7.8613378416,24
8.31264849753,7.8613378416,46
8.31270292958,7.8613378416,47
...

The resulting script can be used with programs like gdal_grid or loaded back into QGIS as a vector layer using the Delimited Text provider:

 

QGIS 74ac7f0 - raster_to_xyz_171

Get your QGIS merchandise while it’s hot!

Since the 2.8 release is done, the QGIS team has been busy with a small side project: setting up a series of shops for fans of QGIS. Right now, the following shops are available:

North America

There is a US and a Canadian shop. Additionally, there is also the possibility to design your own products (US, Canada).


qgis-shop

Europe

There’s also a series of European shops, for example for the UK, Germany, and France. There are more, if Spreadshirt has a site for your country, there’s probably a QGIS shop too.

Australia

Thanks to Nathan for pointing out the Australian shop!

For each product sold, the QGIS project receives around $3 (minus applicable fees) which will go directly towards improving your favorite GIS.


QGIS 2.8 LTR has landed

qgisorg_banner28

It’s finally here! QGIS 2.8 LTR “Wien” is officially available for download now.

What’s an LTR

LTR stands for “Long Term Release”. This means that QGIS now has a system in place to provide a one-year stable release with backported bug fixes. The idea behind LTR is to have a stable platform for enterprises and organizations that don’t want to update their software and training materials more often than once a year. To make the LTR a success, users and developers alike should be aware that bug fixes should be applied to both the LTR branch as well as the normal development branch. If you are interested in the details, you can find more info in the corresponding QGIS Enhancement Proposal.

Users who enjoy working with the cutting-edge version will be able to follow the regular four-monthly release cycle like last year.

What’s new?

This new version comes with many great new features which you can explore in the official visual changelog. It’s really hard to pick but my personal favorites are:

On the layer styling front, there are two great additions: raster image fills and a live heatmap renderer which makes it possible to create dynamic heatmaps on the fly.

raster image fill

Raster image fill symbol layer type

Another feature I’m sure many of you will enjoy is the support for custom prefixes for joins.

Custom join prefixes

Custom join prefixes

Last but not least, I want to point your attention to the great improvements to the rule-based legend which is now structured in a nice tree.

Rule-based renderer legend tree

Rule-based renderer legend tree

Don’t forget to check out the other new features!

Thanks!

None of this would have been possible without the great QGIS community and all the many different people involved in running the project. Thanks a lot to all of you and a special shout out for the sponsors! *applause*

sponsors


How to create a QGIS PDF report with a few lines of python

Sometimes you want to automatically generate a report to reflect the latest state of your data. For example you may be capturing spatial data into a PostGIS database and want a snapshot of that every few hours expressed as a pdf report. This example shows you how you can quickly generate a pdf based on a QGIS project (.qgs file) and a QGIS template (.qpt file).

Using this approach you can generate all kinds of useful outputs without ever needing to open QGIS each time you generate the report. Simply create the needed project and template files and then run it like this:

python generate_pdf.py

Dica para ajustar posição de símbolos em QGIS | Hack to adjust map symbols location in QGIS

De quando em vez aparecem-me zonas com demasiado símbolos no mesmo local, e pensei como seria fantástico se os pudesse arrastar para um local mais conveniente sem ter de alterar as suas geometrias, tal como é possível fazer com as etiquetas. Esse pensamento deu-me a ideia base para a dica que vou demonstrar.

Now and then I get too many map symbols (points) in the same place, and I thought how nice it would be if we could drag n’ drop them around without messing with their geometries position, just like we do with labels. That thought gave me an idea for a cool hack.

Escolha a sua camada de pontos e comece por criar dois novos campos chamados symbX e symbY (Tipo: Decimal; Tamanho: 20; precisão: 5). No separador “Estilo” das propriedades da camada, defina para cada nível do seu símbolo o seguinte: Escolher “unidade do mapa” como a unidade para as opções de afastamento; Usar a seguinte expressão na opção afastamento das propriedades definidas por dados.

Choose your point layer and start by creating two new fields called symbX and symbY (Type: Decimal number; Size: 20; Precision: 5). Now go the layer properties and in the Style tab edit your symbol. For each level of your symbol select “map units” as the offset units, and set the following expression in the offset data define properties option:


CASE WHEN symbX IS NOT NULL AND symbY IS NOT NULL THEN
    tostring($x - symbX) + ',' + tostring($y - symbY)
ELSE
    '0,0'
END

Screenshot from 2015-02-22 18:18:43

Tenha atenção que, se as coordenadas do seu mapa tiver valores negativos, será necessário uma pequena alteração ao código. E. g., se tiver valores negativos em X deverá usar-se  antes a expressão “tostring(symbX -$x)”.

Beware that if your coordinates have negative values you need to adapt the code. E.g., If you have negative values in X you should use “tostring(symbX -$x)” instead.

De forma temporária coloque etiquetas na sua camada usando um texto pequeno (eu usei o ‘+’ (sinal de mais) centrado e com um buffer branco) e defina as coordenadas X e Y dos propriedades definidadas por dados usando os campos symbX e symbY,

Now, temporarly  label your layer with a small convenient text (I used a centered ‘+’ (plus sign) with a white buffer) and set its coordinates to data defined using the symbX and symbY Fields.

Screenshot from 2015-02-22 22:42:07

A partir desse momento, quando usar a ferramenta de mover etiquetas, não só alterará a posição da etiqueta, mas também a do próprio símbolo! Fantástico, não?

From this point on, when you use the move label tool, not only the label position change but also the actual symbol! Pretty cool, isn’t it?

anim

Note que as geometria dos elementos não são alteradas durante o processo. Para além disso, lembre-se que neste caso também poderá adicionar linhas de guia para ligar os símbolos à posição original do ponto.

Notice that the features geometries are not changed during the process. Also, remember that in this case you can also add leading lines to connect the symbols to the original position of the points.


QGIS course at AfQUA

Kartoza has just wrapped up a three-day Introduction to QGIS course that we gave pro bono at The African Quaternary: Environments, Ecology and Humans conference in Cape Town (AfQUA2015). Thank you to Kelly Kirsten from the local organising committee at the University of Cape Town for inviting us. Admire Nyakudya presented to about fifteen conference delegates from around the world. Attendees ran QGIS 2.6.1 on their own notebooks on the operating system of their choice. Some already use QGIS, some were experiencing QGIS for the first time and some some wanted to compare it with ArcGIS. The course content was guided largely by the QGIS training manual but as we usually do, adapted for the requirements, interests and pace of the class.

 

Kartoza QGIS class at AfQUA 2015

Admire presenting QGIS workshop at AfQUA

Publishing interactive web maps using QGIS

We all know that QGIS is great for designing maps but did you know that QGIS is also great for interactive web maps? It is! Just check out qgis2leaf and qgis2threejs.

To give these two plugins a test run and learn some responsive web design, I developed a small concept page presenting cycle routes in 3D.

Screenshot 2015-01-31 22.20.15

Qgis2leaf makes it possible to generate Leaflet maps from QGIS layers. It provides access to different background maps and it’s easy to replace them in the final HTML file in case you need something more exotic. I also added another layer with custom popups with images but that was done manually.

Daten CC-BY-3.0: Land Kärnten - data.ktn.gv.at

The web maps use data CC-BY-3.0: Land Kärnten – data.ktn.gv.at

Qgis2threejs on the other hand creates 3D visualizations based on three.js which uses WebGL. (If you follow my blog you might remember a post a while back which showcased Qgis2threejs rendering OSM buildings.)

This is a great way to explore elevation data. I also think that the labeling capabilities add an interesting touch. Controlling the 3D environment takes some getting used to, but if you can handle Google Earth in your browser, this is no different.

Image of Heiligenblut by Angie (Self-photographed) (GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)), via Wikimedia Commons

Image of Heiligenblut by Angie (Self-photographed) (GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)), via Wikimedia Commons


How to load a QGIS project in python

Today in a project we are working on we wanted to load a QGIS project. It takes  surprisingly few lines of code to make a small standalone application that loads a project and then shows it as a map in a window like this:

QGIS project in a standalone app

 

Here is the code I wrote to produce this:

The main bit of magic is the QgsLayerTreeMapCanvasBridge class which will convert your project into a layer tree so that the layers appear in the canvas. If you ever need to make a standalone python application with a nice map in it, consider using the QGIS API to do it!

A quick hack to select all multipart features in QGIS

Today we wanted to find all the multipart features in this layer:

The layer that needs multipart features identified

Here is a quick hack I did in QGIS to find them:

Just make sure that a vector layer is active in the layer list, paste the above code into the python console and all multipart features will be highlighted for you.

After running the above script, multipart features are hightlighted.

A line gradient style hack

Today’s post was motivated by a question over on gis.stackexchange, basically: How to draw a line with a gradient?

The issue we have to deal with is there is no gradient line style yet … But there are polygon gradient fills. So we can buffer the line and style the buffers. It’s a bit of an exercise in data-defined styling though:

Screenshot 2015-01-11 22.49.41

Before creating the buffer layer, we need to add the coordinates of the line start and end node to the line attributes. This is easy to do using the Field Calculator functions xat and yat, for example xat(0) for the x coordinate of the start node and yat(-1) for the y coordinate of the end node.

Screenshot 2015-01-11 22.41.37

Then we can buffer the lines and start styling the buffers. As mentioned, we’ll use the Gradient fill Symbol layer type.

Screenshot 2015-01-11 22.49.54

The interesting part happens in the Data-defined properties. The start and end colors are computed from the measurement values from_m and to_m. Next, it’s important to use the feature coordinate mode because this will ensure that the coordinate system for the color gradient is based on the feature extent (with [0,0] in the upper left corner of the feature bbox).

Once that’s set up, we can compute the gradient start and end positions based on the line start and end node locations which we added to the attribute table in the beginning. If you’re wondering why Reference point 1 y is based on to_y (y coordinate of the line end point) rather than from_y, it’s due to the difference in coordinate origins in the geometry and the color gradient coordinate space: [0,0] is the lower left corner for the geometries but the upper left corner for the color gradient.

Screenshot 2015-01-11 22.42.35

As the title suggests, this is a really hackish solution for gradient line symbols. It will only provide reasonable results for straight – or close to straight – lines. But I’m very confident that we’ll have a real gradient line style in QGIS sooner or later.


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