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Wed Dec 7 22:05:17 2016

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QGIS Planet

Color Ramp Improvements in Upcoming QGIS 3.0

QGIS’ handling of color ramps has just gotten much better with a series of improvements we committed to the open source project’s upcoming version 3.0.

This slide goes through brief summary of changes: Color ramp handling, made fun! Color ramp handling, made fun!

On the developer front, one nice improvement is the addition of an invert() function directly attached to color ramp classes (QgsColorRamp and its children). This removed the need for symbol layers and renderers to implement individual invert-related functions; those are now served with a customized source color ramp, with edited steps and/or reversed order already taken into account.

QGIS 2.18 packaged for Fedora 23 and 24

qgis-icon_smallThanks to the work of Volker Fröhlich and other Fedora packagers I was able to create RPM packages of QGIS 2.18 Las Palmas for Fedora 23 and 24 using Fedora’s COPR platform.

Repo: https://copr.fedorainfracloud.org/coprs/neteler/QGIS-2.18-Las-Palmas

The following packages can now be installed:

  • qgis 2.18.0
  • qgis-debuginfo 2.18.0
  • qgis-devel 2.18.0
  • qgis-grass 2.18.0
  • qgis-python 2.18.0
  • qgis-server 2.18.0

Installation instructions (run as “root” user or use “sudo”):

su

# Fedora 23, Fedora 24:
dnf copr enable neteler/QGIS-2.18-Las-Palmas
dnf update
# note: the "qca-ossl" package is the OpenSSL plugin for QCA
dnf install qgis qgis-grass qgis-python qca-ossl

Enjoy!

The post QGIS 2.18 packaged for Fedora 23 and 24 appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

Movement data in GIS #4: variations over time

In the previous post, I presented an approach to generalize big trajectory datasets by extracting flows between cells of a data-driven irregular grid. This generalization provides a much better overview of the flow and directionality than a simple plot of the original raw trajectory data can. The paper introducing this method also contains more advanced visualizations that show cell statistics, such as the overall count of trajectories or the generalization quality. Another bit of information that is often of interest when exploring movement data, is the time of the movement. For example, at LBS2016 last week, M. Jahnke presented an application that allows users to explore the number of taxi pickups and dropoffs at certain locations:

By adopting this approach for the generalized flow maps, we can, for example, explore which parts of the research area are busy at which time of the day. Here I have divided the day into four quarters: night from 0 to 6 (light blue), morning from 6 to 12 (orange), afternoon from 12 to 18 (red), and evening from 18 to 24 (dark blue).

 (data credits: GeoLife project,

Aggregated trajectories with time-of-day markers at flow network nodes (data credits: GeoLife project, map tiles: Carto, map data: OSM)

The resulting visualization shows that overall, there is less movement during the night hours from midnight to 6 in the morning (light blue quarter). Sounds reasonable!

One implementation detail worth considering is which timestamp should be used for counting the number of movements. Should it be the time of the first trajectory point entering a cell, or the time when the trajectory leaves the cell, or some average value? In the current implementation, I have opted for the entry time. This means that if the tracked person spends a long time within a cell (e.g. at the work location) the trip home only adds to the evening trip count of the neighboring cell along the trajectory.

Since the time information stored in a PostGIS LinestringM feature’s m-value does not contain any time zone information, we also have to pay attention to handle any necessary offsets. For example, the GeoLife documentation states that all timestamps are provided in GMT while Beijing is in the GMT+8 time zone. This offset has to be accounted for in the analysis script, otherwise the counts per time of day will be all over the place.

Using the same approach, we could also investigate other variations, e.g. over different days of the week, seasonal variations, or the development over multiple years.


Movement data in GIS #3: visualizing massive trajectory datasets

In the fist two parts of the Movement Data in GIS series, I discussed modeling trajectories as LinestringM features in PostGIS to overcome some common issues of movement data in GIS and presented a way to efficiently render speed changes along a trajectory in QGIS without having to split the trajectory into shorter segments.

While visualizing individual trajectories is important, the real challenge is trying to visualize massive trajectory datasets in a way that enables further analysis. The out-of-the-box functionality of GIS is painfully limited. Except for some transparency and heatmap approaches, there is not much that can be done to help interpret “hairballs” of trajectories. Luckily researchers in visual analytics have already put considerable effort into finding solutions for this visualization challenge. The approach I want to talk about today is by Andrienko, N., & Andrienko, G. (2011). Spatial generalization and aggregation of massive movement data. IEEE Transactions on visualization and computer graphics, 17(2), 205-219. and consists of the following main steps:

  1. Extracting characteristic points from the trajectories
  2. Grouping the extracted points by spatial proximity
  3. Computing group centroids and corresponding Voronoi cells
  4. Deviding trajectories into segments according to the Voronoi cells
  5. Counting transitions from one cell to another

The authors do a great job at describing the concepts and algorithms, which made it relatively straightforward to implement them in QGIS Processing. So far, I’ve implemented the basic logic but the paper contains further suggestions for improvements. This was also my first pyQGIS project that makes use of the measurement value support in the new geometry engine. The time information stored in the m-values is used to detect stop points, which – together with start, end, and turning points – make up the characteristic points of a trajectory.

The following animation illustrates the current state of the implementation: First the “hairball” of trajectories is rendered. Then we extract the characteristic points and group them by proximity. The big black dots are the resulting group centroids. From there, I skipped the Voronoi cells and directly counted transitions from “nearest to centroid A” to “nearest to centroid B”.

(data credits: GeoLife project)

From thousands of individual trajectories to a generalized representation of overall movement patterns (data credits: GeoLife project, map tiles: Stamen, map data: OSM)

The resulting visualization makes it possible to analyze flow strength as well as directionality. I have deliberately excluded all connections with a count below 10 transitions to reduce visual clutter. The cell size / distance between point groups – and therefore the level-of-detail – is one of the input parameters. In my example, I used a target cell size of approximately 2km. This setting results in connections which follow the major roads outside the city center very well. In the city center, where the road grid is tighter, trajectories on different roads mix and the connections are less clear.

Since trajectories in this dataset are not limited to car trips, it is expected to find additional movement that is not restricted to the road network. This is particularly noticeable in the dense area in the west where many slow trajectories – most likely from walking trips – are located. The paper also covers how to ensure that connections are limited to neighboring cells by densifying the trajectories before computing step 4.

trajectory_generalization

Running the scripts for over 18,000 trajectories requires patience. It would be worth evaluating if the first three steps can be run with only a subsample of the data without impacting the results in a negative way.

One thing I’m not satisfied with yet is the way to specify the target cell size. While it’s possible to measure ellipsoidal distances in meters using QgsDistanceArea (irrespective of the trajectory layer’s CRS), the initial regular grid used in step 2 in order to group the extracted points has to be specified in the trajectory layer’s CRS units – quite likely degrees. Instead, it may be best to transform everything into an equidistant projection before running any calculations.

It’s good to see that PyQGIS enables us to use the information encoded in PostGIS LinestringM features to perform spatio-temporal analysis. However, working with m or z values involves a lot of v2 geometry classes which work slightly differently than their v1 counterparts. It certainly takes some getting used to. This situation might get cleaned up as part of the QGIS 3 API refactoring effort. If you can, please support work on QGIS 3. Now is the time to shape the PyQGIS API for the following years!


More icons & symbols for QGIS

The possibility to easily share plugins with other users and discover plugins written by other community members has been a powerful feature of QGIS for many years.

The QGIS Resources Sharing plugin is meant to enable the same sharing for map design resources. It allows you to share collections of resources, including but not limited to SVGs, symbols, styles, color ramps, and processing scripts.

Using the Resource Sharing plugin is like using the Plugin Manager. Once installed, you are presented with a list of available resource collections for download. You will find that there are already some really nice collections, including nautical symbols, Mapbox Maki Icons, and my Google-like OSM road style.

resourcesharing_maki

By pressing Install, the resource collection is downloaded and you can have a look at the content using the Open folder button. In case of the Mapbox Maki Icon collection, it contains a folder of SVGs:

resourcesharing_folder

Using the new icons is as simple as opening the layer styling settings and selecting the Mapbox Maki Icons collection in the SVG group list:

resourcesharing_styling

Similarly, if you download the OSM Spatialite Googlemaps collection, its road line symbols are added to your existing list of available line symbols:

resourcesharing_roads2

By pressing the Open Library button, you get to the Style Manager where you can browse through all installed symbols and delete, rename, or categorize them.

resourcesharing_roads

The Resource Sharing plugin was developed by Akbar Gumbira during this year’s Google Summer of Code. The full documentation, including instructions for how to share your own symbols with the community, is available at www.akbargumbira.com/qgis_resources_sharing.


Speeding up your PyQGIS scripts

I’ve recently spent some time optimising the performance of various QGIS plugins and algorithms, and I’ve noticed that there’s a few common performance traps which developers fall into when fetching features from a vector layer. In this post I’m going to explore these traps, what makes them slow, and how to avoid them.

As a bit of background, features are fetched from a vector layer in QGIS using a QgsFeatureRequest object. Common use is something like this:

request = QgsFeatureRequest()
for feature in vector_layer.getFeatures(request):
    # do something

This code would iterate over all the features in layer. Filtering the features is done by tweaking the QgsFeatureRequest, such as:

request = QgsFeatureRequest().setFilterFid(1001)
feature_1001 = next(vector_layer.getFeatures(request))

In this case calling getFeatures(request) just returns the single feature with an ID of 1001 (which is why we shortcut and use next(…) here instead of iterating over the results).

Now, here’s the trap: calling getFeatures is expensive. If you call it on a vector layer, QGIS will be required to setup an new connection to the data store (the layer provider), create some query to return data, and parse each result as it is returned from the provider. This can be slow, especially if you’re working with some type of remote layer, such as a PostGIS table over a VPN connection. This brings us to our first trap:

Trap #1: Minimise the calls to getFeatures()

A common task in PyQGIS code is to take a list of feature IDs and then request those features from the layer. A see a lot of older code which does this using something like:

for id in some_list_of_feature_ids:
    request = QgsFeatureRequest().setFilterFid(id)
    feature = next(vector_layer.getFeatures(request))
    # do something with the feature

Why is this a bad idea? Well, remember that every time you call getFeatures() QGIS needs to do a whole bunch of things before it can start giving you the matching features. In this case, the code is calling getFeatures() once for every feature ID in the list. So if the list had 100 features, that means QGIS is having to create a connection to the data source, set up and prepare a query to match a single feature, wait for the provider to process that, and then finally parse the single feature result. That’s a lot of wasted processing!

If the code is rewritten to take the call to getFeatures() outside of the loop, then the result is:

request = QgsFeatureRequest().setFilterFids(some_list_of_feature_ids)
for feature in vector_layer.getFeatures(request):
    # do something with the feature

Now there’s just a single call to getFeatures() here. QGIS optimises this request by using a single connection to the data source, preparing the query just once, and fetching the results in appropriately sized batches. The difference is huge, especially if you’re dealing with a large number of features.

Trap #2: Use QgsFeatureRequest filters appropriately

Here’s another common mistake I see in PyQGIS code. I often see this one when an author is trying to do something with all the selected features in a layer:

for feature in vector_layer.getFeatures():
    if not feature.id() in vector_layer.selectedFeaturesIds():
        continue

    # do something with the feature

What’s happening here is that the code is iterating over all the features in the layer, and then skipping over any which aren’t in the list of selected features. See the problem here? This code iterates over EVERY feature in the layer. If you’re layer has 10 million features, we are fetching every one of these from the data source, going through all the work of parsing it into a QGIS feature, and then promptly discarding it if it’s not in our list of selected features. It’s very inefficient, especially if fetching features is slow (such as when connecting to a remote database source).

Instead, this code should use the setFilterFids() method for QgsFeatureRequest:

request = QgsFeatureRequest().setFilterFids(vector_layer.selectedFeaturesIds())
for feature in vector_layer.getFeatures(request):
    # do something with the feature

Now, QGIS will only fetch features from the provider with matching feature IDs from the list. Instead of fetching and processing every feature in the layer, only the actual selected features will be fetched. It’s not uncommon to see operations which previously took many minutes (or hours!) drop down to a few seconds after applying this fix.

Another variant of this trap uses expressions to test the returned features:

filter_expression = QgsExpression('my_field > 20')
for feature in vector_layer.getFeatures():
    if not filter_expression.evaluate(feature):
        continue

    # do something with the feature

Again, this code is fetching every single feature from the layer and then discarding it if it doesn’t match the “my_field > 20” filter expression. By rewriting this to:

request = QgsFeatureRequest().setFilterExpression('my_field > 20')
for feature in vector_layer.getFeatures(request):
    # do something with the feature

we hand over the bulk of the filtering to the data source itself. Recent QGIS versions intelligently translate the filter into a format which can be applied directly at the provider, meaning that any relevant indexes and other optimisations can be applied by the provider itself. In this case the rewritten code means that ONLY the features matching the ‘my_field > 20’ criteria are fetched from the provider – there’s no time wasted messing around with features we don’t need.

 

Trap #3: Only request values you need

The last trap I often see is that more values are requested from the layer then are actually required. Let’s take the code:

my_sum = 0
for feature in vector_layer.getFeatures(request):
    my_sum += feature['value']

In this case there’s no way we can optimise the filters applied, since we need to process every feature in the layer. But – this code is still inefficient. By default QGIS will fetch all the details for a feature from the provider. This includes all attribute values and the feature’s geometry. That’s a lot of processing – QGIS needs to transform the values from their original format into a format usable by QGIS, and the feature’s geometry needs to be parsed from it’s original type and rebuilt as a QgsGeometry object. In our sample code above we aren’t doing anything with the geometry, and we are only using a single attribute from the layer. By calling setFlags( QgsFeatureRequest.NoGeometry ) and setSubsetOfAttributes() we can tell QGIS that we don’t need the geometry, and we only require a single attribute’s value:

my_sum = 0
request = QgsFeatureRequest().setFlags(QgsFeatureRequest.NoGeometry).setSubsetOfAttributes(['value'], vector_layer.fields() )
for feature in vector_layer.getFeatures(request):
    my_sum += feature['value']

None of the unnecessary geometry parsing will occur, and only the ‘value’ attribute will be fetched and populated in the features. This cuts down both on the processing required AND the amount of data transfer between the layer’s provider and QGIS. It’s a significant improvement if you’re dealing with larger layers.

Conclusion

Optimising your feature requests is one of the easiest ways to speed up your PyQGIS script! It’s worth spending some time looking over all your uses of getFeatures() to see whether you can cut down on what you’re requesting – the results can often be mind blowing!

QGIS Atlas Tutorial – Material Design

This is a guest post by Mickael HOARAU @Oneil974

For people who are working on QGIS Atlas feature, I worked on an Atlas version of the last tutorial I have made. The difficulty level is a little bit more consequente then last tutorial but there are features that you could appreciate. So I’m happy to share with you and I hope this would be helpful.

Click to view slideshow.

You can download tutorial here:

Material Design – QGIS Atlas Tutorial

And sources here:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B37RnaYSMWAZUUJ2NUxhZC1TNmM/view?usp=sharing

 

PS : I’m looking for job offers, feel free to contact me on twitter @Oneil974


Movement data in GIS #2: visualization

In the first part of the Movement Data in GIS series, I discussed some of the common issues of modeling movement data in GIS, followed by a recommendation to model trajectories as LinestringM features in PostGIS to simplify analyses and improve query performance.

Of course, we don’t only want to analyse movement data within the database. We also want to visualize it to gain a better understanding of the data or communicate analysis results. For example, take one trajectory:

(data credits: GeoLife project)

Visualizing movement direction is easy: just slap an arrow head on the end of the line and done. What about movement speed? Sure! Mean speed, max speed, which should it  be?

Speed along the trajectory, a value for each segment between consecutive positions.

With the usual GIS data model, we are back to square one. A line usually has one color and width. Of course we can create doted and dashed lines but that’s not getting us anywhere here. To visualize speed variations along the trajectory, we therefore split the original trajectory into its segments, 1429 in this case. Then we can calculate speed for each segment and use a graduated or data defined renderer to show the results:

trajectory_segment_features

Speed along trajectory: red = slow to blue = fast

Very unsatisfactory! We had to increase the number of features 1429 times just to show speed variations along the trajectory, even though the original single trajectory feature already contained all the necessary information and QGIS does support geometries with measurement values.

Starting from QGIS 2.14, we have an alternative way to deal with this issue. We can stick to the original single trajectory feature and render it using the new geometry generator symbol layer. (This functionality is also used under the hood of the 2.5D renderer.) Using the segments_to_lines() function, the geometry generator basically creates individual segment lines on the fly:

geomgenerator

Segments_to_lines( $geometry) returns a multi line geometry consisting of a line for every segment in the input geometry

Once this is set up, we can style the segments with a data-defined expression that determines the speed on the segment and returns the respective color along a color ramp:

segment_speed_color

Speed is calculated using the length of the segment and the time between segment start and end point. Then speed values from 0 to 50 km/h are mapped to the red-yellow-blue color ramp:

ramp_color(
  'RdYlBu',
  scale_linear(
    length( 
      transform(
	    geometry_n($geometry,@geometry_part_num),
		'EPSG:4326','EPSG:54027'
		)
    ) / (
      m(end_point(  geometry_n($geometry,@geometry_part_num))) -
      m(start_point(geometry_n($geometry,@geometry_part_num)))
    ) * 3.6,
    0,50,
    0,1
  )
)

Thanks a lot to @nyalldawson for all the help figuring out the details!

While the following map might look just like the previous one in the end, note that we now only deal with the original single line feature:

trajectory_geomgenerator

Similar approaches can be used to label segments or positions along the trajectory without having to break the original feature. Thanks to the geometry generator functionality, we can make direct use of the LinestringM data model for trajectory visualization.


6th QGIS UK user group meeting in Edinburgh

The 6th QGIS UK user group meeting in Scotland is happening on the 3rd November 2016.  It is being hosted by the EDINA University of Edinburgh at the Informatics Forum and is sponsored by thinkWhere, Ordnance Survey, Angus Council and Cawdor Forestry.  Tickets are available through Eventbrite.

The almost final programme of presentations and lightning talks is as follows:

  • Phil Taylor (CEH) – How deep is your loch?
  • Fiona Hemsley-Flint – QGIS server
  • University of Edinburgh – packaging and deploying QGIS
  • Anouk Lang – Mapping narrative: QGIS in the humanities classroom
  • Art Lembo (Salisbury University, MD) – terrain analysis with massively parallel processing techniques (embarrasingly so)
  • Neil Benny (thinkWhere) – finding the heart of Scotland / viewshed analysis
  • Tom Chadwin – qgis2web and coding a QGIS plugin
  • Pete Wells (Lutra) – WMTS previews and XYZ support
  • Stephen Bathgate – decision support system in Forestry
  • Tim Manners (Ordnance Survey) – Creating an indoor routable network with QGIS and pgRouting
  • Andrew Whitelee – QGIS in forestry/ecology
  • Ross McDonald (Angus Council) – Them thar hills: shaded, textured and blended
  • Michal Michalski (The Origins of Doha and Qatar Project) – DOHA: Doha Online Historical Atlas
  • eeGeo – Using QGIS to create 3D indoor maps

Doors open from 9:00. Registration shortly thereafter. Start and welcome at 9:45 and a planned finish at 16:30. Geobeers to follow.


How to visualize bird migration data with QGIS TimeManager

A common use case of the QGIS TimeManager plugin is visualizing tracking data such as animal migration data. This post illustrates the steps necessary to create an animation from bird migration data. I’m using a dataset published on Movebank:

Fraser KC, Shave A, Savage A, Ritchie A, Bell K, Siegrist J, Ray JD, Applegate K, Pearman M (2016) Data from: Determining fine-scale migratory connectivity and habitat selection for a migratory songbird by using new GPS technology. Movebank Data Repository. doi:10.5441/001/1.5q5gn84d.

It’s a CSV file which can be loaded into QGIS using the Add delimited text layer tool. Once loaded, we can get started:

1. Identify time and ID columns

Especially if you are new to the dataset, have a look at the attribute table and identify the attributes containing timestamps and ID of the moving object. In our sample dataset, time is stored in the aptly named timestamp attribute and uses ISO standard formatting %Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S.%f. This format is ideal for TimeManager and we can use it without any changes. The object ID attribute is titled individual-local-identifier.

movebank_data

The dataset contains 128 positions of 14 different birds. This means that there are rather long gaps between consecutive observations. In our animation, we’ll want to fill these gaps with interpolated positions to get uninterrupted movement traces.

2. Configuring TimeManager

To set up the animation, go to the TimeManager panel and click Settings | Add Layer. In the following dialog we can specify the time and ID attributes which we identified in the previous step. We also enable linear interpolation. The interpolation option will create an additional point layer in the QGIS project, which contains the interpolated positions.

timemanager_settings

When using the interpolation option, please note that it currently only works if the point layer is styled with a Single symbol renderer. If a different renderer is configured, it will fail to create the interpolation layer.

Once the layer is configured, the minimum and maximum timestamps will be displayed in the TimeManager dock right bellow the time slider. For this dataset, it makes sense to set the Time frame size, that is the time between animation frames, to one day, so we will see one frame per day:

timemanager_dock

Now you can test the animation by pressing the TimeManager’s play button. Feel free to add more data, such as background maps or other layers, to your project. Besides exploring the animated data in QGIS, you can also create a video to share your results.

3. Creating a video

To export the animation, click the Export video button. If you are using Linux, you can export videos directly from QGIS. On Windows, you first need to export the animation frames as individual pictures, which you can then convert to a video (for example using the free Windows Movie Maker application).

These are the basic steps to set up an animation for migration data. There are many potential extensions to this animation, including adding permanent traces of past movements. While this approach serves us well for visualizing bird migration routes, it is easy to imagine that other movement data would require different interpolation approaches. Vehicle data, for example, would profit from network-constrained interpolation between observed positions.

If you find the TimeManager plugin useful, please consider supporting its development or getting involved. Many features, such as interpolation, are weekend projects that are still in a proof-of-concept stage. In addition, we have the huge upcoming challenge of migrating the plugin to Python 3 and Qt5 to support QGIS3 ahead of us. Happy QGISing!


QGIS2 compatibility plugin

Lately I’ve been spending time porting a bigger plugin from QGIS 2.8 to 3 while maintaining 2.8 compatibility. You can find it at https://github.com/opengisch/qgis2compat/ and http://plugins.qgis.org/plugins/qgis2compat/ One code to rule them all. My target was to have to edit the

How to use Print Composer templates

In the previous post, Mickael shared a great map design. The download includes a print composer template, that you can use to recreate the design in a few simple steps:

1. Create a new composition based on a template

Open the Composer manager and configure it to use a specific template. Then you can select the .qpt template file and press the Add button to create a new composition based on the template.

2. Update image item paths

If the template uses images, the paths to the images most likely need to be fixed since the .qpt file stores absolute file paths instead of relative ones.

update_image_paths

With these steps, you’re now ready to use the design for your own maps. Happy QGISing!


Material design map tutorial for QGIS Composer

This is a guest post by Mickael HOARAU @Oneil974

For those wishing to get a stylized map on QGIS composer, I’ve been working on a tutorial to share with you a project I’m working on. Fan of web design and GIS user since few years, I wanted to merge Material Design Style with Map composer. Here is a tutorial to show you how to make simply a Material Design Map style on QGIS.

Click to view slideshow.

You can download tutorial here:

Tutorial Material Design Map

And sources here:

Sources Material Design Map

An Atlas Powered version is coming soon!


Using threads in QGIS python plugins

Here an example on how to work with threads in a consistent and clean manner in QGIS python plugins

Point cluster renderer crowdfunding – successful!

Great news! Thanks in part to some generous last minute pledges, our QGIS Point Cluster Renderer campaign has successfully reached its target. This means that QGIS 3.0 will now include a full feature and flexible cluster renderer.

In the meantime, we’d like to extend our warmest thanks to the following generous contributors, whose pledges have made this work possible:

  • Andreas Neumann
  • Qtibia Engineering (Tudor Barascu)
  • Karl-Magnus Jönsson
  • Geonesia (Nicolas Ponzo)

Plus numerous additional anonymous backers whose generous contributions are also highly valued. If you run into any of these funders at a QGIS user group or conference, make sure you treat them like the GIS rock-stars they are!

Keep an eye out on our social media accounts as we’ll be posting more video demonstrations of this work as it lands in the QGIS codebase.

BOTH

Reporting back from Bonn & Oslo

Over the last two weeks, I had the pleasure to attend both the international FOSS4G conference in Bonn, Germany, as well as the regional FOSS4G-NOR in Oslo, Norway. Both events were superbly organized and provided tons of possibilities to share experiences and find new inspiration.

Talks at both conferences have been recorded and can be watched online: Bonn / Oslo

I enjoyed having the opportunity to give two very different talks. In Bonn, I presented work on pedestrian routing and navigation, which was developed within the PERRON project:

It was particularly nice that we had plenty of time for Q&A after this presentation since only two talks were scheduled for this session rather than the usual three. I’d also like to thank everyone for the great feedback – both in person and on Twitter!

In Oslo, I had the honor to give the opening keynote on OpenSource in general and the QGIS project in particular:

2 – Anita Graser – QGIS – A Community-powered GIS Project from krokskogstrollet on Vimeo.

Both conferences were packed with great sessions and talks. If I had to pick favorites from last week’s presentations, I would have to opt for Iván Sánchez presenting his latest projects, including what3fucks and geohaiku:

6 – Iván Sánchez Ortega, Mazemap – Addressing NSFW Geodesic Grids from krokskogstrollet on Vimeo.

Followed closely by the impressive project presentations of the student organizers of FOSS4G-NOR:

10 – Program Committee – What are the results when students use Open Source? from krokskogstrollet on Vimeo.

All three projects: OPPTUR, GISTYLE, and the flexible traffic web viewer were great demos of what can be achieved with open source tools. Mathilde’s GISTYLE project is also available on Github.

An inspiring GISummer comes to an end, but with so many videos to watch and workshop materials to explore, I’m convinced that the autumn will be no less exciting.


Point cluster renderer crowdfunding – the final countdown!

At North Road we are currently running a crowdfunding campaign to sponsor work on a new “Point Cluster Renderer” for QGIS. This is a really exciting new feature which would help make possible some neat styling effects which just aren’t possible in QGIS at the moment. The campaign is now in its final hours and we’ve still got some way to go to reach the campaign goals. If you’re interested in seeing this feature happen, now’s the time to jump onboard and contribute to the campaign!

Before time runs out we’d like to share some more details on how the cluster renderer can be enhanced through the use of data defined symbol overrides. Data defined overrides are where a huge part of QGIS’ symbology power resides. If you’re not familiar with them, we’d suggest grabbing a copy of Anita Graser and Gretchen Peterson’s reference “QGIS Map Design” (seriously – buy this book. You won’t regret it!). Basically, data defined properties allow you to set rules in place which control exactly how each individual feature in a layer is rendered. So, for instance, you can create an override which makes just a single feature render in a different color, or with a larger label, or so that all features with a value over 100 render with a bold label.

We’ve designed the point cluster renderer to take full advantage of QGIS data defined symbology. What this means is that the cluster symbol (ie, the marker which is rendered when 2 or more points are sufficiently close together) will respect any data defined overrides you set for this symbol, and each individual cluster symbol can have a different appearance as a result.

To make this even more flexible, the clusterer will also provide two additional new variables which can be used in data defined overrides for the symbol. The first of these, @cluster_size, will be preset to equal the number of features which have been clustered together at that point. Eg, if the cluster consists of 4 individual neighbouring features, then @cluster_size will be 4 when the cluster symbol is rendered. This can be used to alter the appearance of the cluster symbol based on the number of associated points. The mockup below shows how this could be used to scale the cluster symbol size so that clusters with more points are rendered larger than clusters with less points:

symbol_sizeIn this mockup we’ve also used a font marker symbol layer to render the actual cluster size inside the symbol too. Of course, because almost every property of symbols in QGIS can be data defined there’s almost no limit how @cluster_size could be used – you could use it to change the symbol color by pairing it with QGIS’ ramp_color function, or alter the symbol opacity, or the outline width… basically anything!

The second new expression variable which would be introduced with the cluster renderer is @cluster_color. This variable allows you to access the color of the points contained within each cluster. Since the cluster renderer is built “on top” of an existing renderer, any point which is NOT contained within a cluster is rendered using the specified renderer. For example, if you use a categorized symbol renderer then all points which aren’t in clusters will be drawn using these categorized classes. In this case isolated points will be drawn using different colors to match the predefined classes.

When multiple points are clustered together, @cluster_color will be set to match the color of any contained points. The points must all have the same color, if they differ then @cluster_color will be null. It’s easiest to illustrate this concept! In the below mockup, we’ve used a categorized render to shade points by an attribute (in this case rail line segment name), and used an uninspiring dark grey circle for the cluster markers:

clusters_categorized

Using @cluster_color together with a data defined color override, we can force these cluster markers to retain the colors from the points within each cluster:

clusters_categorized2

Much nicer! You’ll note that a single dark grey point remains, which is where the cluster consists of stations from multiple different line segments. In this case @cluster_color is null, so the data defined override is not applied and the marker falls back to the dark grey color.

Of course, both @cluster_size and @cluster_color can be combined to create some very nice results:

BOTH

So there we have it – using data defined overrides with the cluster marker renderer allows for extremely flexible, powerful cartography!

Now’s the time to get involved… if you’re wanting to see this feature in QGIS, head over to the crowd funding page to find out how YOU can contribute!

 

OSGeo Code Sprint in Bonn

It’s been a great week in Bonn! I joined the other members of the QGIS project at the pre-FOSS4G code sprint at the Basecamp, the weirdest location we’ve had for a developer meeting so far. We used this opportunity to have a face-to-face meeting of the QGIS PSC  with special guests Matthias Kuhn (on QGIS 3.0 and bug tracker discussions) and Lene Fischer (on community team issues)  – notes here.

picture by Tim Sutton

QGIS PSC meeting in action (from left to right: Otto Dassau, Paolo Cavallini, Anita Graser, Andreas Neumann, Jürgen E. Fischer), picture by Tim Sutton

I also finally took the time to compile a blog post on the results of the QGIS user survey 2015.

The code sprint was also a great opportunity to present the results of Akbar Gumbira’s Google Summer of Code project: the QGIS Resource Sharing plugin. This plugin makes it possible to easily share resources (such as SVG icons, symbol definitions, QGIS styles, and Processing scripts) with other QGIS users through an interface that closely resembles the well-known QGIS Plugin Manager. Akbar has also prepared great presentation with background info and screencasts showcasing his project.

QGIS Resource Sharing presentation, picture by @foss4g

QGIS Resource Sharing presentation, picture by @foss4g

The plugin is now available in the Plugin Repository and we have created the official QGIS Resources repository on Github. If you have symbols or styles that you want to share with the community, please create a resource collection and send us a pull request to add it to the official list.

Thanks to all the organizers who worked hard to make this one of the most well-organized and enjoyable code sprints I’ve ever been to. You are awesome!


Special FOSS4G offer: 25% off QGIS Map Design

FOSS4G2016 is drawing closer quickly. To get in the mood for a week full of of geogeekery, Locate Press is offering a special FOSS4G discount for QGIS Map Design.

Use the code foss4gbonn to get 25% off your copy.

QGIS Map Design is the reference book to get if you want to bring your mapping skills up to speed. The book comes with a download for all our example map projects:

qmd114 qmd132 qmd140 qmd128 qmd174 qmd58 qmd152 qmd158 qmd64 qmd46 qmd146 qmd188 qmd164 qmd20 qmd90 qmd78 qmd84 qmd108 qmd184 qmd34 qmd180 qmd120 qmd26 qmd104 qmd168 qmd100 qmd52

Looking forward to meeting you in Bonn!


How to effectively get things changed in QGIS – a follow up

Last week I posted regarding some thoughts I’ve had recently concerning what I perceive as a general confusion about how QGIS is developed and how users can successfully get things to change in the project. The post certainly started a lot of conversation! However, based on feedback received I realise some parts of the posts were being misinterpreted and some clarification is needed. So here we go…

1. Please keep filing bug reports/feature requests

I don’t think I was very clear about this – but my original post wasn’t meant to be a discouragement from filing bug reports or feature requests. The truth is that there is a LOT of value in these reports, and if you don’t file a report then the QGIS team will never be aware of the bug or your feature idea. Here’s some reasons why you SHOULD file a report:

  • QGIS developers are a conscientious mob, and generally take responsibility for any regressions they’ve caused by changes they’ve made. In other words, there’s very much an attitude of “I-broke-it, I’ll-fix-it” in the project. So, if a new feature is buggy or has broken something else then filing bugs ASAP is the best way to make the developer aware of these issues. In my experience they’ll usually be addressed rapidly.
  • As mentioned in the original post – there’s always a pre-release bug fix sprint, so filing a bug (especially if it’s a critical one) may mean that it’s addressed during this sprint.
  • Filing feature requests can gain traction if your idea is innovative, novel, or interesting enough to grab a developer’s attention!

Speaking for myself, I regularly check new incoming tickets (at least once a day), and I know I’m not the only one. So filing a report WILL bring your issue to developer’s attention. Which leads to…

2. Frustration is understandable!

I can honestly understand why people get frustrated and resort to an aggressive “why hasn’t this been fixed yet?!” style reply. I believe that these complaints are caused because people have the misunderstanding that filing a bug report is the ONLY thing they can do to get an issue fixed. If filing a report IS the only avenue you have to get something fixed/implemented, then it’s totally understandable to be annoyed when your ticket gets no results. This is a failing on behalf of the project though – we need to be clearly communicating that filing a report is the LEAST you can do. It’s a good first step, but on its own it’s just the beginning and needs to be followed up by one of the methods I described in the initial post.

3. It applies to more than just code

When I wrote the original piece I focused on just the code aspect of the QGIS project. That’s only because I’m a developer and it’s the area I know best. But it applies equally across the whole project, including documentation, translations, infrastructure, websites, packaging QGIS releases, etc. In fact, some of these non-code areas are the best entry points into the project as they don’t require a development background, and eg the documentation and translation teams have done a great job making it easy to submit contributions. Find something missing in the QGIS documentation? Add it yourself! Missing a translation of the website which prevents QGIS adoption within your community? Why not sponsor a translator to tackle this task?!

4. It applies to more than just QGIS!

Again, I wrote the original piece focusing on QGIS because that’s the project I’m most familiar with. You could just as easily substitute GDAL, GEOS, OpenLayers, PostGIS, Geoserver, R, D3, etc… in and it would be equally valid!

Hopefully that helps clarify some of the points raised by the earlier article. Let’s keep the discussion flowing – I’d love to hear if you have any other suggestions or questions raised by this topic.

 

 

 

 

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