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Fri Jun 22 23:00:09 2018

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QGIS Planet

Using Threads in PyQGIS3

While porting a plugin to QGIS3 I decided to also move all it’s threading infrastructure to QgsTasks. Here three possible variants to implement this. the first uses the static method QgsTask.fromFunction and is simpler to use. A great quick solution.

PyQGIS for non-programmers

If you’re are following me on Twitter, you’ve certainly already read that I’m working on PyQGIS 101 a tutorial to help GIS users to get started with Python programming for QGIS.

I’ve often been asked to recommend Python tutorials for beginners and I’ve been surprised how difficult it can be to find an engaging tutorial for Python 3 that does not assume that the reader already knows all kinds of programming concepts.

It’s been a while since I started programming, but I do teach QGIS and Python programming for QGIS to university students and therefore have some ideas of which concepts are challenging. Nonetheless, it’s well possible that I overlook something that is not self explanatory. If you’re using PyQGIS 101 and find that some points could use further explanations, please leave a comment on the corresponding page.

PyQGIS 101 is a work in progress. I’d appreciate any feedback, particularly from beginners!

Create a QGIS vector data provider in Python is now possible

 

Why python data providers?

My main reasons for having Python data provider were:

  • quick prototyping
  • web services
  • why not?

 

This topic has been floating in my head for a while since I decided to give it a second look and I finally implemented it and merged for the next 3.2 release.

 

How it’s been done

To make this possible I had to:

  • create a public API for registering the providers
  • create the Python bindings (the hard part)
  • create a sample Python vector data provider (the boring part)
  • make all the tests pass

 

First, let me say that it wasn’t like a walk in the park: the Python bindings part is always like diving into woodoo and black magic recipes before I can get it to work properly.

For the Python provider sample implementation I decided to re-implement the memory (aka: scratch layers) provider because that’s one of the simplest providers and it does not depend on any external storage or backend.

 

How to and examples

For now, the main source of information is the API and the tests:

To register your own provider (PyProvider in the snippet below) these are the basic steps:

metadata = QgsProviderMetadata(PyProvider.providerKey(), PyProvider.description(), PyProvider.createProvider)
QgsProviderRegistry.instance().registerProvider(metadata)

To create your own provider you will need at least the following components:

  • the provider class itself (subclass of QgsVectorDataProvider)
  • a feature source (subclass of QgsAbstractFeatureSource)
  • a feature iterator (subclass of QgsAbstractFeatureIterator)

Be aware that the implementation of a data provider is not easy and you will need to write a lot of code, but at least you could get some inspiration from the existing example.

 

Enjoy wirting data providers in Python and please let me know if you’ve fond this implementation useful!

Locatieserver: about parcels and roadnumbers

For those interested in dutch OpenData: our national OpenData service PDOK has a Solr based geocoding service available. Since this week it is possible to search for ‘parcel’ codes to find cadastral parcels, but also to search on so called ‘hectometer-paaltjes': the little green number signs you see when you drive the dutch highways. So … Continue reading Locatieserver: about parcels and roadnumbers

AmsterdamTimeMachine

Via twitter: AmsterdamTimeMachine.nl. Jan Hartman’s and WebMappers hard work of georeferencing a set of Old Amsterdam maps: http://amsterdamtimemachine.nl. 6 XYZ-Map services with maps old as 1625 to have a look into history, off course also to be loaded in QGIS Wanna see ‘the red light district’ in 1625? Or see Dutch 17th century glory on … Continue reading AmsterdamTimeMachine

Coding a QgsLocator (Plugin)

What is a Locator (plugin) Some months ago, Nyall Dawson silently dropped a nice widget into the lower left corner of your QGIS screen: People familiar with QtCreator (the Qt-development environment) should recognize it as a QtCreator Locator look-a-like: a way to (very) quickly search in your project for words, classes, bookmarks, help topics, files … Continue reading Coding a QgsLocator (Plugin)

Movement data in GIS #13: Timestamp labels for trajectories

In Movement data in GIS #2: visualization I mentioned that it should be possible to label trajectory segments without having to break the original trajectory feature. While it’s not a straightforward process, it is indeed possible to create timestamp labels at desired intervals:

The main point here is that we cannot use regular labels because there would be only one label for the whole trajectory feature. Instead, we are using a marker line with a font marker:

By default, font markers only display one character from a given font but by using expressions we can make it display longer text, including datetime strings:

If you want to have a label at every node of the trajectory, the expression looks like this:

format_date( 
   to_datetime('1970-01-01T00:00:00Z')+to_interval(
      m(start_point(geometry_n(
         segments_to_lines( $geometry ),
         @geometry_part_num)
      ))||' seconds'
   ),
   'HH:mm:ss'
)

You probably remember those parts of the expression that extract the m value from previous posts. Note that – compared to 2016 – it is now necessary to add the segments_to_lines() function.

The m value (which stores time as seconds since Unix epoch) is then converted to datetime and finally formatted to only show time. Of course you can edit the datetime format string to also include the date.

If we only want a label every 30 seconds, we can add a case statement around that:

CASE WHEN 
m(start_point(geometry_n(
   segments_to_lines( $geometry ),
   @geometry_part_num)
)) % 30 = 0
THEN
format_date( 
   to_datetime('1970-01-01T00:00:00Z')+to_interval(
      m(start_point(geometry_n(
         segments_to_lines( $geometry ),
         @geometry_part_num)
      ))||' seconds'
   ),
   'HH:mm:ss'
)
END

This works well if the trajectory sampling interval is fairly regular. This is not always the case and that means that the above case statement wouldn’t find many nodes with a timestamp that ends in :30 or :00. In such a case, we could resort to labeling nodes based on their order in the linestring:

CASE WHEN 
 @geometry_part_num  % 30 = 0
THEN
...

Thanks a lot to @JuergenEFischer for providing a solution for converting seconds since Unix epoch to datetime without a custom function!

Note that expressions using @geometry_part_num currently suffer from the following issue: Combination of segments_to_lines($geometry) and @geometry_part_num gives wrong segment numbers


This post is part of a series. Read more about movement data in GIS.

Drill down (cascading) forms in QGIS crowdfund – final stretch!

Update: donations are now closed, with the outcome of the campaign pending!

We’re nearing the final hours of our crowd funding campaign to implement a drill-down (cascading) field support within QGIS forms, and thanks to numerous generous backers we’re very close to hitting the funding goal! This is a really exciting new feature which would help add greater flexibility and power to QGIS feature forms, but in order to implement it for QGIS 3.2 we need to hit the funding target by 11 May 2018.

As a result, we’re dropping the minimum contribution amount and throwing open the campaign for payments of any amount. These smaller payment will be treated as direct donations to the campaign, so unlike the standard campaign backing these are payable up front. In the case that the campaign IS NOT successful, the donations will not be refunded and will instead be reinvested back into the QGIS (via bug fixing and maintenance efforts). Of course, if you’d prefer to pledge using the standard crowdfunding “no payment if campaign unsuccessful” model you’re more than welcome to! (Full details are available on the campaign page).

Donations closed – outcome pending!

Full details are available on the campaign page.

PdokServicesPlugin, new version

This post is to announce the availability of a new version of the PdokServicePlugin. Unless a heavy user of Dutch Public Datasources (WMS, WFS, WCS), this is probably mostly interesting for Dutchies. But if you want to know how many kilometers somebody is living from the nearest Fire Department Station:

Marco becomes QGIS.org Co-chair

We are very proud to announce that one of our founders and directors Marco Bernasocchi was elected as QGIS.org project steering committee (PSC) co-chair. With over 10 years of involvement with QGIS (he started working with QGIS 0.6) Marco will

Drill-down (cascading) forms in QGIS crowdfund launched!

We’ve just launched a new crowd funding campaign to implement a drill-down (cascading) field support within QGIS forms. Full details are available on the campaign page.

This is a really exciting new feature which would help add greater flexibility and power to QGIS feature forms! To make it possible we need 3500€ pledged before 11 May 2018. You can help make this a reality by supporting the campaign or by sharing the page and increasing exposure to the campaign. Updates to follow!

Porting QGIS plugins to API v3 – Strategy and tools

The Release of QGIS 3.0 was a great success and with the first LTR (3.4) scheduled for release this fall, it is now the perfect time to port your plugins to the new API. QGIS 3.0 is the first major

Optional parameters in QGIS Processing scripts & models

Remember the good old times when all parameters in Processing were mandatory?

Inputs and outputs are fixed, and optional parameters or outputs are not supported. [Graser & Olaya, 2015]

Since QGIS 2.14, this is no longer the case. Scripts, as well as models, can now have optional parameters. Here is how for QGIS 3:

When defining a Processing script parameter, the parameter’s constructor takes a boolean flag indicating whether the parameter should be optional. It’s false by default:

class qgis.core.QgsProcessingParameterNumber(
   name: str, description: str = '', 
   type: QgsProcessingParameterNumber.Type = QgsProcessingParameterNumber.Integer, 
   defaultValue: Any = None, 
   optional: bool = False,
   minValue: float = -DBL_MAX+1, maxValue: float = DBL_MAX)

(Source: http://python.qgis.org/api/core/Processing/QgsProcessingParameterNumber.html)

One standard tool that uses optional parameters is Add autoincremental field:

From Python, this algorithm can be called with or without the optional parameters:

When building a model, an optional input can be assigned to the optional parameter. To create an optional input, make sure to deactivate the mandatory checkbox at the bottom of the input parameter definition:

Then this optional input can be used in an algorithm. For example, here the numerical input optional_value is passed to the Start values at parameter:

You can get access to all available inputs by clicking the … button next to the Start values at field. In this example, I have access to values of the input layer as well as  the optional value:

Once this is set up, this is how it looks when the model is run:

You can see that the optional value is indeed Not set.

References

Graser, A., & Olaya, V. (2015). Processing: A Python Framework for the Seamless Integration of Geoprocessing Tools in QGIS. ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2015, 4, 2219-2245. doi:10.3390/ijgi4042219.

Processing script template for QGIS3

Processing has been overhauled significantly for QGIS 3.0. Besides speed-ups, one of the most obvious changes is the way to write Processing scripts. Instead of the old Processing-specific syntax, Processing scripts for QGIS3 are purely pythonic implementations of QgsProcessingAlgorithm.

Here’s a template that you can use to develop your own algorithms:

from qgis.PyQt.QtCore import QCoreApplication, QVariant
from qgis.core import (QgsField, QgsFeature, QgsFeatureSink, QgsFeatureRequest, QgsProcessing, QgsProcessingAlgorithm, QgsProcessingParameterFeatureSource, QgsProcessingParameterFeatureSink)
                      
class ExAlgo(QgsProcessingAlgorithm):
    INPUT = 'INPUT'
    OUTPUT = 'OUTPUT'

    def __init__(self):
        super().__init__()

    def name(self):
        return "exalgo"
    
    def tr(self, text):
        return QCoreApplication.translate("exalgo", text)
        
    def displayName(self):
        return self.tr("Example script")

    def group(self):
        return self.tr("Examples")

    def groupId(self):
        return "examples"

    def shortHelpString(self):
        return self.tr("Example script without logic")

    def helpUrl(self):
        return "https://qgis.org"
        
    def createInstance(self):
        return type(self)()
  
    def initAlgorithm(self, config=None):
        self.addParameter(QgsProcessingParameterFeatureSource(
            self.INPUT,
            self.tr("Input layer"),
            [QgsProcessing.TypeVectorAnyGeometry]))
        self.addParameter(QgsProcessingParameterFeatureSink(
            self.OUTPUT,
            self.tr("Output layer"),
            QgsProcessing.TypeVectorAnyGeometry))

    def processAlgorithm(self, parameters, context, feedback):
        source = self.parameterAsSource(parameters, self.INPUT, context)
        (sink, dest_id) = self.parameterAsSink(parameters, self.OUTPUT, context,
                                               source.fields(), source.wkbType(), source.sourceCrs())

        features = source.getFeatures(QgsFeatureRequest())
        for feat in features:
            out_feat = QgsFeature()
            out_feat.setGeometry(feat.geometry())
            out_feat.setAttributes(feat.attributes())
            sink.addFeature(out_feat, QgsFeatureSink.FastInsert)

        return {self.OUTPUT: dest_id}

This script just copies the features of the input layer to the output layer without any modifications. Add your logic to the processAlgorithm() function to get started.

Use Create New Script from the Toolbox toolbar:

Paste the example script:

Once saved, the script will show up in the Processing toolbox:

Revisiting point & polygon joins

Joining polygon attributes to points based on their location is a very common GIS task. In QGIS 2, QGIS’ own implementation of “Join attributes by location” was much slower than SAGA’s “Add polygon attributes to points”. Thus, installations without SAGA were out of good options.

Luckily this issue (and many more) has been fixed by the rewrite of many geoprocessing algorithms for QGIS 3! Let’s revisit the comparison:

I’m using publicly available datasets from Naturalearth: The small scale populated places (243 points) and the large scale countries (255 polygons with many nodes). Turns out that QGIS 3’s built-in tool takes a little less than two seconds while the SAGA Processing tool requires a litte less than six seconds:

Like in the previous comparison, times were measured using the Python Console:

In both tools, only the countries’ SOVEREIGNT attribute is joined to the point attribute table:

import processing
t0 = datetime.datetime.now()
print("QGIS Join attributes by location ...")
processing.runAndLoadResults(
   "qgis:joinattributesbylocation", 
   {'INPUT':'E:/Geodata/NaturalEarth/vector_v4/natural_earth_vector/110m_cultural/ne_110m_populated_places.shp',
   'JOIN':'E:/Geodata/NaturalEarth/vector_v4/natural_earth_vector/10m_cultural/ne_10m_admin_0_countries.shp',
   'PREDICATE':[5],'JOIN_FIELDS':['SOVEREIGNT'],
   'METHOD':0,'DISCARD_NONMATCHING':False,'OUTPUT':'memory:'})
t1 = datetime.datetime.now()
print("Runtime: "+str(t1-t0))
print("SAGA Add polygon attributers to points ...")
processing.runAndLoadResults("saga:addpolygonattributestopoints", 
   {'INPUT':'E:/Geodata/NaturalEarth/vector_v4/natural_earth_vector/110m_cultural/ne_110m_populated_places.shp',
   'POLYGONS':'E:/Geodata/NaturalEarth/vector_v4/natural_earth_vector/10m_cultural/ne_10m_admin_0_countries.shp',
   'FIELDS':'SOVEREIGNT','OUTPUT':'C:/Users/anita/AppData/Local/Temp/processing_8b1bbde78de5490285dd530e115cca52/099660d88bf14c54a853cc230e388e55/OUTPUT.shp'})
t2 = datetime.datetime.now()
print("Runtime: "+str(t2-t1))

It is worth noting that it takes longer if more attributes are to be joined to the point layer attribute table. For example, if the JOIN_FIELDS parameter is empty:

'JOIN_FIELDS':[]

instead of

'JOIN_FIELDS':['SOVEREIGNT']

then the the Join attributes by location takes almost 16 seconds. (The country layer contains 71 attributes after all.)

(The SAGA tool currently allows only joining one attribute at a time.)

QGIS 3 Server deployment showcase with Python superpowers

Recently I was invited by the colleagues from OpenGIS.ch to lend a hand in a training session about QGIS server.

This was a good opportunity to update my presentation for QGIS3, to fix a few bugs and to explore the powerful capabilities of QGIS server and Python.

As a result, I published the full recipe of a Vagrant VM on github: https://github.com/elpaso/qgis3-server-vagrant

The presentation is online here: http://www.itopen.it/bulk/qgis3-server/

What’s worth mentioning is the sample plugins (I’ll eventually package and upload them to the official plugin site):

 

The VM uses 4 different (although similar) deployment strategies:

  • good old Apache + mod_fcgi and plain CGI
  • Nginx + Fast CGI
  • Nginx + standalone HTTP Python wrapped server
  • Nginx + standalone WSGI Python wrapped server

Have fun with QGIS server: it was completely refactored in QGIS 3 and it’s now better than ever!

 

(Nederlands) Je eerste 3-D kaart in QGIS 3.0

Sorry, this entry is only available in the Dutch language

Use your android phone’s GPS in QGIS

Do you want to share your GPS data from your phone to QGIS? Here is how:   QGIS comes with a core plugin named GPS Tools that can be enabled in the Plugin installer dialog:   There are several ways to forward data from your phone and most of them are very well described in the QGIS manual page: https://docs.qgis.org/testing/en/docs/user_manual/working_with_gps/plugins_gps.html What I’m going to describe here is mostly useful when your phone and your host machine running QGIS are on the same network (for example they are connected to the same WiFi access point) and it is based on the simple application GPS 2 NET   Once the application is installed and started on your phone, you need to know the IP address of the phone, on a linux box you can simply run a port scanner and it will find all devices connected to the port 6000 (the default port used by GPS 2 NET):  

# Assuming your subnet is 192.168.9

nmap -p 6000 192.168.1.*

Nmap scan report for android-8899989888d02271.homenet.telecomitalia.it (192.168.99.50)
Host is up (0.0093s latency).
PORT STATE SERVICE
6000/tcp open X11

  Now, in QGIS you can open the plugin dialog through Vector -> GPS -> GPS Tools and enter the IP address and port of your GPS device:   Click on Connect button on the top right corner (mouse over the gray square for GPS status information)   Start digitizing!

Where's my .qgis3 Folder?

There's been several posts to GIS StackExchange along the lines of:

Where's my .qgis3 folder?

Prior to QGIS 3, the .qgis/.qgis2 folder was found under your home directory. At version 3, the folder has moved to a more standard profile location for your operating system.

There are a couple of ways to determine where the folder is located:

  • Use the Settings->User Profiles->Open active profile folder menu item
  • Use QgsApplication.qgisSettingsDirPath from Python or the console

Here are the "standard" locations for Linux, Mac, and Windows, as found under your HOME directory:

  • Linux:
    • .local/share/QGIS/QGIS3/profiles/default
  • Mac OS X:
    • Library/Application Support/QGIS/QGIS3/profiles/default
  • Windows:
    • AppData\Roaming\QGIS\QGIS3\profiles\default

To get the location of your plugins directory, just add python/plugins to the appropriate location above. For example:

AppData\Roaming\QGIS\QGIS3\profiles\default\python\plugins

From the Settings->User Profiles menu, you'll notice a New profile item. This allows you to have multiple configurations of QGIS 3. Each new profile is created in the same "base" location as listed above. For example:

AppData\Roaming\QGIS\QGIS3\profiles\new_profile

Implementing an in-house “New Project Wizard” for QGIS

Recently, we were required to implement a custom “New Project Wizard” for use in a client’s internal QGIS installation. The goal here was that users would be required to fill out certain metadata fields whenever they created a new QGIS project.

Fortunately, the PyQGIS (and underlying Qt) libraries makes this possibly, and relatively straightforward to do. Qt has a powerful API for creating multi-page “wizard” type dialogs, via the QWizard and QWizardPage classes. Let’s have a quick look at writing a custom wizard using these classes, and finally we’ll hook it into the QGIS interface using some PyQGIS magic.

We’ll start super simple, creating a single page wizard with no settings. To do this we first create a Page1 subclass of QWizardPage, a ProjectWizard subclass of QWizard, and a simple runNewProjectWizard function which launches the wizard. (The code below is designed for QGIS 3.0, but will run with only small modifications on QGIS 2.x):

class Page1(QWizardPage):

    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        super().__init__(parent)
        self.setTitle('General Properties')
        self.setSubTitle('Enter general properties for this project.')


class ProjectWizard(QWizard):
    
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        super().__init__(parent)
        
        self.addPage(Page1(self))
        self.setWindowTitle("New Project")


def runNewProjectWizard():
    d=ProjectWizard()
    d.exec()

If this code is executed in the QGIS Python console, you’ll see something like this:

Not too fancy (or functional) yet, but still not bad for 20 lines of code! We can instantly make this a bit nicer by inserting a custom logo into the widget. This is done by calling setPixmap inside the ProjectWizard constructor.

class ProjectWizard(QWizard):
    
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        super().__init__(parent)
        
        self.addPage(Page1(self))
        self.setWindowTitle("New Project")

        logo_image = QImage('path_to_logo.png')
        self.setPixmap(QWizard.LogoPixmap, QPixmap.fromImage(logo_image))

That’s a bit nicer. QWizard has HEAPS of options for tweaking the wizards — best to read about those over at the Qt documentation. Our next step is to start adding some settings to this wizard. We’ll keep things easy for now and just insert a number of text input boxes (QLineEdits) into Page1:

class Page1(QWizardPage):

    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        super().__init__(parent)
        self.setTitle('General Properties')
        self.setSubTitle('Enter general properties for this project.')

        # create some widgets
        self.project_number_line_edit = QLineEdit()
        self.project_title_line_edit = QLineEdit()
        self.author_line_edit = QLineEdit()        
        
        # set the page layout
        layout = QGridLayout()
        layout.addWidget(QLabel('Project Number'),0,0)
        layout.addWidget(self.project_number_line_edit,0,1)
        layout.addWidget(QLabel('Title'),1,0)
        layout.addWidget(self.project_title_line_edit,1,1)
        layout.addWidget(QLabel('Author'),2,0)
        layout.addWidget(self.author_line_edit,2,1)
        self.setLayout(layout)

There’s nothing particularly new here, especially if you’ve used Qt widgets before. We make a number of QLineEdit widgets, and then create a grid layout containing these widgets and accompanying labels (QLabels). Here’s the result if we run our wizard now:

So now there’s the option to enter a project number, title and author. The next step is to force users to populate these fields before they can complete the wizard. Fortunately, QWizardPage has us covered here and we can use the registerField() function to do this. By calling registerField, we make the wizard aware of the settings we’ve added on this page, allowing us to retrieve their values when the wizard completes. We can also use registerField to automatically force their population by appending a * to the end of the field names. Just like this…

class Page1(QWizardPage):
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        super().__init__(parent)
        ...
        self.registerField('number*',self.project_number_line_edit)
        self.registerField('title*',self.project_title_line_edit)
        self.registerField('author*',self.author_line_edit)

If we ran the wizard now, we’d be forced to enter something for project number, title and author before the Finish button becomes enabled. Neat! By registering the fields, we’ve also allowed their values to be retrieved after the wizard completes. Let’s alter runNewProjectWizard to retrieve these values and do something with them:

def runNewProjectWizard():
   d=ProjectWizard()
   d.exec()

   # Set the project title
   title=d.field('title')
   QgsProject.instance().setTitle(d.field('title'))

   # Create expression variables for the author and project number
   number=d.field('number')
   QgsExpressionContextUtils.setProjectVariable(QgsProject.instance(),'project_number', number)
   author=d.field('author')
   QgsExpressionContextUtils.setProjectVariable(QgsProject.instance(),'project_author', author)
 

Here, we set the project title directly and create expression variables for the project number and author. This allows their use within QGIS expressions via the @project_number and @project_author variables. Accordingly, they can be embedded into print layout templates so that layout elements are automatically populated with the corresponding author and project number. Nifty!

Ok, let’s beef up our wizard by adding a second page, asking the user to select a sensible projection (coordinate reference system) for their project. Thanks to improvements in QGIS 3.0, it’s super-easy to embed a powerful pre-made projection selector widget into your scripts, which even includes a handy preview of the area of the world that the projection is valid for.

class Page2(QWizardPage):

    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        super().__init__(parent)
        self.setTitle('Project Coordinate System')
        self.setSubTitle('Choosing an appropriate projection is important to ensure accurate distance and area measurements.')
        
        self.proj_selector = QgsProjectionSelectionTreeWidget()
        layout = QVBoxLayout()
        layout.addWidget(self.proj_selector)
        self.setLayout(layout)
        
        self.registerField('crs',self.proj_selector)
        self.proj_selector.crsSelected.connect(self.crs_selected)
        
    def crs_selected(self):
        self.setField('crs',self.proj_selector.crs())
        self.completeChanged.emit()
        
    def isComplete(self):
        return self.proj_selector.crs().isValid()

There’s a lot happening here. First, we subclass QWizardPage to create a second page in our widget. Then, just like before, we add some widgets to this page and set the page’s layout. In this case we are using the standard QgsProjectionSelectionTreeWidget to give users a projection choice. Again, we let the wizard know about our new setting by a call to registerField. However, since QWizard has no knowledge about how to handle a QgsProjectionSelectionTreeWidget, there’s a bit more to do here. So we make a connection to the projection selector’s crsSelected signal, hooking it up to a function which sets the wizard’s “crs” field value to the widget’s selected CRS. Here, we also emit the completeChanged signal, which indicates that the wizard page should re-validate the current settings. Lastly, we override QWizardPage’s isComplete method, checking that there’s a valid CRS selection in the selector widget. If we run the wizard now we’ll be forced to choose a valid CRS from the widget before the wizard allows us to proceed:

Lastly, we need to adapt runNewProjectWizard to also handle the projection setting:

def runNewProjectWizard():
    d=ProjectWizard()
    d.exec()

    # Set the project crs
    crs=d.field('crs')
    QgsProject.instance().setCrs(crs)

    # Set the project title
    title=d.field('title')
    ...

Great! A fully functional New Project wizard. The final piece of the puzzle is triggering this wizard when a user creates a new project within QGIS. To do this, we hook into the iface.newProjectCreated signal. By connecting to this signal, our code will be called whenever the user creates a new project (after all the logic for saving and closing the current project has been performed). It’s as simple as this:

iface.newProjectCreated.connect(runNewProjectWizard)

Now, whenever a new project is made, our wizard is triggered – forcing users to populate the required fields and setting up the project accordingly!

There’s one last little bit to do – we also need to prevent users cancelling or closing the wizard before completing it. That’s done by changing a couple of settings in the ProjectWizard constructor, and by overriding the default reject method (which prevents closing the dialog by pressing escape).

class ProjectWizard(QWizard):
    
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        super().__init__(parent)
        ...
        self.setOption(QWizard.NoCancelButton, True)
        self.setWindowFlags(self.windowFlags() | QtCore.Qt.CustomizeWindowHint)
        self.setWindowFlags(self.windowFlags() & ~QtCore.Qt.WindowCloseButtonHint)

    def reject(self):
        pass

Here’s the full version of our code, ready for copying and pasting into the QGIS Python console:

icon_path = '/home/nyall/nr_logo.png'

class ProjectWizard(QWizard):
    
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        super().__init__(parent)
        
        self.addPage(Page1(self))
        self.addPage(Page2(self))
        self.setWindowTitle("New Project")
        
        logo_image=QImage('path_to_logo.png')
        self.setPixmap(QWizard.LogoPixmap, QPixmap.fromImage(logo_image))
        
        self.setOption(QWizard.NoCancelButton, True)
        self.setWindowFlags(self.windowFlags() | QtCore.Qt.CustomizeWindowHint)
        self.setWindowFlags(self.windowFlags() & ~QtCore.Qt.WindowCloseButtonHint)
    def reject(self):
        pass
class Page1(QWizardPage):
    
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        super().__init__(parent)
        self.setTitle('General Properties')
        self.setSubTitle('Enter general properties for this project.')

        # create some widgets
        self.project_number_line_edit = QLineEdit()
        self.project_title_line_edit = QLineEdit()
        self.author_line_edit = QLineEdit()        
        
        # set the page layout
        layout = QGridLayout()
        layout.addWidget(QLabel('Project Number'),0,0)
        layout.addWidget(self.project_number_line_edit,0,1)
        layout.addWidget(QLabel('Title'),1,0)
        layout.addWidget(self.project_title_line_edit,1,1)
        layout.addWidget(QLabel('Author'),2,0)
        layout.addWidget(self.author_line_edit,2,1)
        self.setLayout(layout)
        
        self.registerField('number*',self.project_number_line_edit)
        self.registerField('title*',self.project_title_line_edit)
        self.registerField('author*',self.author_line_edit)
 
 
class Page2(QWizardPage):
    
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        super().__init__(parent)
        self.setTitle('Project Coordinate System')
        self.setSubTitle('Choosing an appropriate projection is important to ensure accurate distance and area measurements.')
        
        self.proj_selector = QgsProjectionSelectionTreeWidget()
        layout = QVBoxLayout()
        layout.addWidget(self.proj_selector)
        self.setLayout(layout)
        
        self.registerField('crs',self.proj_selector)
        self.proj_selector.crsSelected.connect(self.crs_selected)
        
    def crs_selected(self):
        self.setField('crs',self.proj_selector.crs())
        self.completeChanged.emit()
        
    def isComplete(self):
        return self.proj_selector.crs().isValid()
 
        
def runNewProjectWizard():
    d=ProjectWizard()
    d.exec()
    
    # Set the project crs
    crs=d.field('crs')
    QgsProject.instance().setCrs(crs)
    
    # Set the project title
    title=d.field('title')
    QgsProject.instance().setTitle(d.field('title'))

    # Create expression variables for the author and project number
    number=d.field('number')
    QgsExpressionContextUtils.setProjectVariable(QgsProject.instance(),'project_number', number)
    author=d.field('author')
    QgsExpressionContextUtils.setProjectVariable(QgsProject.instance(),'project_author', author)
    
    
iface.newProjectCreated.connect(runNewProjectWizard)

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