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Wed Feb 19 04:05:12 2020

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First working MovingPandas setup on Databricks

In December, I wrote about GeoPandas on Databricks. Back then, I also tried to get MovingPandas working but without luck. (While GeoPandas can be installed using Databricks’ dbutils.library.installPyPI("geopandas") this PyPI install just didn’t want to work for MovingPandas.)

Now that MovingPandas is available from conda-forge, I gave it another try and … *spoiler alert* … it works!

First of all, conda support on Databricks is in beta. It’s not included in the default runtimes. At the time of writing this post, “6.0 Conda Beta” is the latest runtime with conda:

Once the cluster is up and connected to the notebook, a quick conda list shows the installed packages:

Time to install MovingPandas! I went with a 100% conda-forge installation. This takes a looong time (almost half an hour)!

When the installs are finally done, it get’s serious: time to test the imports!

Success!

Now we can put the MovingPandas data structures to good use. But first we need to load some movement data:

Or course, the points in this GeoDataFrame can be plotted. However, the plot isn’t automatically displayed once plot() is called on the GeoDataFrame. Instead, Databricks provides a display() function to display Matplotlib figures:

MovingPandas also uses Matplotlib. Therefore we can use the same approach to plot the TrajectoryCollection that can be created from the GeoDataFrame:

These Matplotlib plots are nice and quick but they lack interactivity and therefore are of limited use for data exploration.

MovingPandas provides interactive plotting (including base maps) using hvplot. hvplot is based on Bokeh and, luckily, the Databricks documentation tells us that bokeh plots can be exported to html and then displayed using  displayHTML():

Of course, we could achieve all this on MyBinder as well (and much more quickly). However, Databricks gets interesting once we can add (Py)Spark and distributed processing to the mix. For example, “Getting started with PySpark & GeoPandas on Databricks” shows a spatial join function that adds polygon information to a point GeoDataFrame.

A potential use case for MovingPandas would be to speed up flow map computations. The recently added aggregator functionality (currently in master only) first computes clusters of significant trajectory points and then aggregates the trajectories into flows between these clusters. Matching trajectory points to the closest cluster could be a potential use case for distributed computing. Each trajectory (or each point) can be handled independently, only the cluster locations have to be broadcast to all workers.

Flow map (screenshot from MovingPandas tutorial 4_generalization_and_aggregation.ipynb)

 

Movement data in GIS #27: extracting trip origin clusters from MovingPandas trajectories

This post is a follow-up to the draft template for exploring movement data I wrote about in my previous post. Specifically, I want to address step 4: Exploring patterns in trajectory and event data.

The patterns I want to explore in this post are clusters of trip origins. The case study presented here is an extension of the MovingPandas ship data analysis notebook.

The analysis consists of 4 steps:

  1. Splitting continuous GPS tracks into individual trips
  2. Extracting trip origins (start locations)
  3. Clustering trip origins
  4. Exploring clusters

Since I have already removed AIS records with a speed over ground (SOG) value of zero from the dataset, we can use the split_by_observation_gap() function to split the continuous observations into individual trips. Trips that are shorter than 100 meters are automatically discarded as irrelevant clutter:

traj_collection.min_length = 100
trips = traj_collection.split_by_observation_gap(timedelta(minutes=5))

The split operation results in 302 individual trips:

Passenger vessel trajectories are blue, high-speed craft green, tankers red, and cargo vessels orange. Other vessel trajectories are gray.

To extract trip origins, we can use the get_start_locations() function. The list of column names defines which columns are carried over from the trajectory’s GeoDataFrame to the origins GeoDataFrame:

 
origins = trips.get_start_locations(['SOG', 'ShipType']) 

The following density-based clustering step is based on a blog post by Geoff Boeing and uses scikit-learn’s DBSCAN implementation:

from sklearn.cluster import DBSCAN
from geopy.distance import great_circle
from shapely.geometry import MultiPoint

origins['lat'] = origins.geometry.y
origins['lon'] = origins.geometry.x
matrix = origins.as_matrix(columns=['lat', 'lon'])

kms_per_radian = 6371.0088
epsilon = 0.1 / kms_per_radian

db = DBSCAN(eps=epsilon, min_samples=1, algorithm='ball_tree', metric='haversine').fit(np.radians(matrix))
cluster_labels = db.labels_
num_clusters = len(set(cluster_labels))
clusters = pd.Series([matrix[cluster_labels == n] for n in range(num_clusters)])
print('Number of clusters: {}'.format(num_clusters))

Resulting in 69 clusters.

Finally, we can add the cluster labels to the origins GeoDataFrame and plot the result:

origins['cluster'] = cluster_labels

To analyze the clusters, we can compute summary statistics of the trip origins assigned to each cluster. For example, we compute a representative (center-most) point, count the number of trips, and compute the mean speed (SOG) value:

 
def get_centermost_point(cluster):
    centroid = (MultiPoint(cluster).centroid.x, MultiPoint(cluster).centroid.y)
    centermost_point = min(cluster, key=lambda point: great_circle(point, centroid).m)
    return Point(tuple(centermost_point)[1], tuple(centermost_point)[0])
centermost_points = clusters.map(get_centermost_point) 

The largest cluster with a low mean speed (indicating a docking or anchoring location) is cluster 29 which contains 43 trips from passenger vessels, high-speed craft, an an undefined vessel:

To explore the overall cluster pattern, we can plot the clusters colored by speed and scaled by the number of trips:

Besides cluster 29, this visualization reveals multiple smaller origin clusters with low speeds that indicate different docking locations in the analysis area.

Cluster locations with high speeds on the other hand indicate locations where vessels enter the analysis area. In a next step, it might be interesting to compute flows between clusters to gain insights about connections and travel times.

It’s worth noting that AIS data contains additional information, such as vessel status, that could be used to extract docking or anchoring locations. However, the workflow presented here is more generally applicable to any movement data tracks that can be split into meaningful trips.

For the full interactive ship data analysis tutorial visit https://mybinder.org/v2/gh/anitagraser/movingpandas/binder-tag


This post is part of a series. Read more about movement data in GIS.

Movement data in GIS #26: towards a template for exploring movement data

Exploring new datasets can be challenging. Addressing this challenge, there is a whole field called exploratory data analysis that focuses on exploring datasets, often with visual methods.

Concerning movement data in particular, there’s a comprehensive book on the visual analysis of movement by Andrienko et al. (2013) and a host of papers, such as the recent state of the art summary by Andrienko et al. (2017).

However, while the literature does provide concepts, methods, and example applications, these have not yet translated into readily available tools for analysts to use in their daily work. To fill this gap, I’m working on a template for movement data exploration implemented in Python using MovingPandas. The proposed workflow consists of five main steps:

  1. Establishing an overview by visualizing raw input data records
  2. Putting records in context by exploring information from consecutive movement data records (such as: time between records, speed, and direction)
  3. Extracting trajectories & events by dividing the raw continuous tracks into individual trajectories and/or events
  4. Exploring patterns in trajectory and event data by looking at groups of the trajectories or events
  5. Analyzing outliers by looking at potential outliers and how they may challenge preconceived assumptions about the dataset characteristics

To ensure a reproducible workflow, I’m designing the template as a a Jupyter notebook. It combines spatial and non-spatial plots using the awesome hvPlot library:

This notebook is a work-in-progress and you can follow its development at http://exploration.movingpandas.org. Your feedback is most welcome!

 

References

  • Andrienko G, Andrienko N, Bak P, Keim D, Wrobel S (2013) Visual analytics of movement. Springer Science & Business Media.
  • Andrienko G, Andrienko N, Chen W, Maciejewski R, Zhao Y (2017) Visual Analytics of Mobility and Transportation: State of the Art and Further Research Directions. IEEE Transactions on Intelligent Transportation Systems 18(8):2232–2249, DOI 10.1109/TITS.2017.2683539

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